10 Ways to Start Losing Weight

Christa Sgobba wrote for Silver Sneaker by Tivity Health that you know you want to lose weight, and you have a pretty good idea of what you should do to make it happen. You just need to get started. And unfortunately, that’s often the hardest part.

When motivation is lacking, remember this: Shedding pounds does not require a complete diet-and-exercise overhaul. In fact, starting small is often the best way to meet—and maintain—your weight loss goals, says Tony Gentilcore, C.S.C.S., founder of CORE in Boston. The good habits you adopt can snowball, leading to bigger changes down the line too, he says.

Here are ten ways to start losing weight with minimal effort.

1. Eat Foods That Hydrate You

It may sound counterintuitive, but eating more food can be a key to weight loss—as long as we’re talking about foods with a high water content, says Christine Rosenbloom, Ph.D., R.D., author of Food and Fitness After 50.

Eating water-rich foods like fruits, vegetables, or broth-based soups can fill you up, leaving you less likely to overeat on more calorie-dense foods, she says.

In fact, a study published in the journal Appetite found that when people ate a broth-based vegetable soup 15 minutes before a pasta lunch, they consumed 20 percent fewer calories overall, compared to when they just ate their main meal. The researchers believe the soup slows the rate at which food moves through your digestive tract, which can increase feelings of satiety.

There’s a mental benefit too: Seeing more food in front of you can make you feel less deprived, Rosenbloom says. And that can cut your urge to end your meal with a calorie-rich dessert.

Try starting your meal with a broth-based soup, even if you’re eating at home. Not a soup fan? Look for other ways to include more water-rich foods to your plate. “Add two or three leaves of lettuce or more tomato on your sandwich,” Rosenbloom says. Read more

Believe It Or Not, Coffee Helps You Live Longer!

 www.coffemakerguide.com shared with Healthy Lombard that finally, this is the news that all coffee lovers have been waiting for. After all the negative Nellies clamoring about the ill-effects of coffee, a hearty news comes our way: Coffee can help you live longer! No, this is not a claim by coffee addicts in fact these are conclusions by two separate studies! Thus, the magic of Science has proven that a greater consumption of coffee could result in the drinker living a longer life.

One of the two is a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine. The study explores the relation between coffee consumption and mortality. The study was conducted in 521,330 people scattered around 10 European countries. The scientists observed the liver function and metabolic health in relation to coffee consumption. After a period of time, it was noticed that subjects that had been consuming coffee had a lower mortality rate. Finally, the study mentions that drinking coffee is directly related to reduced risk of dying from various causes and the relationship of coffee and mortality did not vary by the country.

The second study, again published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, tried a more inclusive approach and studied non-white sections of the population. This study included 185,855 people with diverse background and ethnicities like Native Hawaiians, African Americans, Latinos, and Japanese Americans. This study declared that the result is the same as the first study irrespective of the race of the person participating in the study. Thus, coffee increases longevity in general despite varied race, lifestyle, and dietary preferences. Interestingly, the study claimed that those who drank 2-4 cups of coffee in a day had 18% lower risk of dying than those who did not consume the beverage.

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Cancer Fighting Foods

 

Evelyn Sherman, a member of  the content team at Steroidsmag, is an ardent health lover, and writer who shares information about health supplements, does product reviews ,and also shares awesome tips on living a healthy life.

In today’s article, Evelyn talks about how Cancer and food habits have a close link and that this has been proved over and over again. Hence it is important to choose the foods we eat carefully. We are pleased to share below top 12 cancer fighting foods and we are sure it will go a long way in helping you and your family members to stay healthy. These foods are rich in antioxidants, vitamins and minerals and when they are consumed regularly they could help a lot in preventing various forms of cancers. The foods mentioned below have been chosen after quite a bit of research and therefore they will be useful in more ways than one.

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Coping With Multiple Sclerosis—For Patients and Caregivers

Rebecca Evans@GeriatricNursing.org, a registered nurse,and a health writer, honors March as  Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month by compositing the follow blog to share with the readers of our blog:

For individuals diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, the diagnosis can be both scary (after all, what does multiple sclerosis really mean?) and a relief (the thing that has been haunting your life finally has a name).

After that diagnosis, however, there can be a transition period, where you struggle to figure out what your treatment and management plan should look like—and where the people in your life struggle to figure out how to act around you, and how to best help you.

That transition period can be incredibly difficult, frustrating, and stressful. Hopefully this article can help you both as you make the transition.

After all, MS patients need help and support—support friends and family often want to give, but may not know how. Consider this a beginning as you start the dialogue with your friends and family.

 

Communication and Education

When a diagnosis is first made, you, your friends, and your family may all have a lot of reading to do. What is MS? What are the symptoms? What are the treatments? What’s the long-term prognosis?

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Best Way to Treat a Tonsil Stone Infection

Lyle MacLeod macleodlyle@gmail.com   who started a resource to help people remove, prevent and treat a tonsil stone infection, shared with Healthy Lombard that  tonsil stones, if you don’t know, are little balls of calcified old food particles, debris and dead cells that sit within the crypts of your tonsils. They are usually the result of poor oral hygiene and often cause symptoms such as bad breath, swelling of the throat and trouble swallowing.

This may not sound like much but tonsil stones can actually put a big damper on someone’s everyday. They can even force people away from social situations because of the fear that those around them will comment on their resultant bad breath.

It can be an extremely demoralising infection and is definitely one you want to learn how to treat properly. Which is exactly what I’m going to show you in this article.

Removal
Just like kidney stones, tonsil stones can be removed. This is usually the first protocol for those effected and shouldn’t be too difficult depending on how severe your situation is (if they’re big enough, a doctor may need to remove them for you).

There are many different ways to take them out but I’ve outlined a few that I think are the most effective.

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4 Sneaky Signs of Burnout

 

Tired asian man with eye pain holding glasses in hand

Elizabeth Millard shared with  self@newsletter.self.com  with daunting work tasks, never-finished housework, and raging political firestorms, it’s easy to feel depleted. But when does that frazzle turn from temporary stress into chronic stress and burnout?

“We’re not machines, we all have a limit,” says Jephtha Tausig-Edwards, M.D., a New York–based clinical psychologist. “If you hit that, then you come to the point where you can’t function effectively,” she tells SELF.

Clinically, burnout is defined as having three distinct components: a feeling of low personal accomplishment, detachment from others, and emotional exhaustion. This might come from overwork, but almost any aspect of life can deliver chronic stress if there’s a sense of being overwhelmed.

For example, you could get burned out from volunteer work, exercise, family responsibilities, or any combination of the above. So you’re chairing five committees, dog sitting for a neighbor, and just took on a major basement cleanout? That cracking sound you hear is your self-care abilities splintering.

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Overcoming Roadblocks to Healthy Eating

The National Institute of Aging shared that some common problems, like those listed below, can make it harder for older people to follow through on smart food choices.

Here are some problem-solving suggestions.

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What You Should Know About Artificial Sweeteners

ELIZABETH LASETER  shared with Cooking Light that artificial sweeteners are abundant in sugar-free beverages such as diet soda, fruit juices, and energy drinks, but they’re also used in processed foods such as candy, yogurt, bread, and even microwave popcorn. But how safe are they, and if you’re cutting out sugar, are they a good replacement? We called on several experts to weigh in.

Also called high-intensity sweeteners, artificial sweeteners are used to sweeten many food and beverage products without increasing grams of sugar. The majority are “non-nutritive,” meaning they flavor food without adding additional calories. They’re also much sweeter (sometimes hundreds of times sweeter) than table sugars such as granulated or brown sugar, and just a small amount can deliver an intense punch of sweetness to foods.   Read more

What Your Hair Says About Your Health

Kim Hayes wrote for AARP that while many of us only focus on the aesthetic pleasure of having flowing shiny locks, the fact is that dull, limp strands, or hair loss, can sometimes indicate a health issue. Here are a few conditions to watch out for: Hair loss and graying
While thinning and graying hair can be a standard part of aging for both women and men, a recent study of 2,000 men in India showed that participants who had coronary artery disease were more likely to be prematurely bald or gray. The study, conducted by the European Society of Cardiology on men under 40, discovered that the 50 percent of participants with coronary artery disease were more likely to have gone prematurely gray, versus 30 percent of a healthy control group, the BBC reports. The participants in the heart condition group were also more likely (49 percent) to have male pattern baldness, compared with those in the healthy group (27 percent).

Metabolic or hormonal stress and certain medications can cause hair loss, especially if it is sudden. This condition is called Telogen effluvium, according to Medscape. In a majority of cases, new hair starts growing within six months, but longer durations of the condition also exist.

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NIH Initiative To Help End The Opioid Crisis

Opioid addiction, misuse and overdose is an ongoing and rapidly evolving public health crisis.  To address the crisis, NIH is launching a comprehensive, trans-NIH Initiative on opioid addiction and pain. This Initiative will build on extensive, well-established NIH research, including basic science of the complex neurological pathways involved in pain and addiction, implementation science to develop and test treatment models, and research to integrate behavioral interventions with Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD). Successes from this research include the development of the nasal form of naloxone, the most commonly used nasal spray for reversing opioid overdose, the development of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid use disorder, and new molecular targets for pain management. Read more