The reason for supplementation

The Shaklee March Newsletter shared that with busy lives and food choices that are less than ideal, it is hard to get the essential nutrients we need for good health. Based on Daily Values (DV) for just 16 nutrients, 11 of the 16 were deemed to be “gap nutrients”.i And DVs reflect expert consensus about generally adequate amounts to meet basic requirements in most healthy people – not what may be required to achieve optimal health.

Why Supplement? – Ensuring we are getting the nourishment needed to support our bodies’ optimal functions can be a challenge, but nutritional supplementation can help fill in those gaps. Countless research studies and health experts agree that supplementing with key nutrients, including a multivitamin and multimineral complex, phytonutrients, probiotics, and omega-3 fatty acids, provides a good nutritional foundation.

The Landmark Study – To understand the relationship between supplementation and long-term health, the first-of-its-kind Landmark Study was conducted in collaboration with researchers from the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. Researchers gathered a group of long-term (20+ years) multiple-supplementiii users and compared their health to non-supplement users.

The Findings – Researchers discovered that the overall health of long-term multiple-supplement users was dramatically different from that of non-supplement users. The multiple-supplement users had improved levels of important heart-healthy biomarkers.

As expected, the multiple-supplement users also had substantially higher levels of nutrients in the blood.

Lower Risk of Disease – As a group, the multiple-supplement users had a lower risk of high blood pressure (39%) and diabetes (73%), and multiple measures of cardiovascular risk trended in favor of supplementation.

Managing Diabetes with Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine

Acupuncturists Jenn McGrath shared that i is estimated that 25.8 million people in the United States have diabetes, a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 1 in 4 people remain unaware that they live with diabetes.

It is important to get a diagnosis as soon as you suspect that diabetes may be a problem for you, as untreated diabetes affects the whole body and can lead to other medical problems, including heart disease, kidney failure, blindness, peripheral neuropathy, digestive disorders and periodontal disease. In order to manage diabetes, it is essential to make healthy lifestyle choices in diet, exercise and other areas. Another important factor when treating diabetes is creating a support team of health care professionals, including a licensed acupuncturist.

Diabetes According to Oriental Medicine

Acupuncture and Oriental medicine have been used to treat diabetes for over 2000 years. According to Oriental medicine, diabetes is caused by an imbalance of the cyclical flow of Qi within the meridians and organ systems. This particular imbalance produces heat that depletes the body’s fluids and Qi, causing symptoms such as extreme fatigue, lethargy, unexplained weight loss, excessive thirst, excessive urination, excessive eating, slow healing of cuts and wounds, infections, irritability, tingling or numbness in the extremities and blurry vision.

Offering a holistic approach, acupuncture and Oriental medicine provide a treatment plan specifically tailored to each individual to relieve symptoms associated with diabetes. Acupuncture and Oriental medicine can assist the body return to a healthy functioning state. In addition to acupuncture, a variety of techniques may be used during treatment, including bodywork, lifestyle changes, dietary recommendations, exercises or herbal medicine.

No Drugs for Back Pain, New Guidelines Say

SUMATHI REDDY shared in the Wall Street Journal that the American College of Physicians says to use natural and alternative therapies first.

Lower back pain—one of the most common reasons for a doctor’s visit—is best treated with alternative, natural and psychological therapies, say new guidelines from the American College of Physicians.

Opioids—one of the most commonly prescribed medications for pain relief and a source of increasing addiction and death—should only be considered for chronic back pain when other alternatives—natural and prescription—don’t work, say the guidelines published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Even acetaminophen, which includes the brand name Tylenol, is no longer recommended for acute lower back pain relief due to a 2014 study in the journal The Lancet that showed it was no more effective than placebo. “For consumers who need to treat their minor aches and pains due to backache, Tylenol is a short-term treatment option when used as directed,” said a spokesperson for Johnson & Johnson Consumer, which manufacturers Tylenol.

The new guidelines could influence how doctors treat patients with complaints of back pain. They are an update from 2007’s and include a review of more than 150 studies. Recommendations were broken down into acute and subacute lower back pain, which is pain lasting less than 12 weeks, and chronic pain, which is pain lasting more than 12 weeks. They don’t apply to radicular low back pain, sometimes referred to as sciatica, which is caused by compression of the nerves in the spine and can result in leg pain. Read more

Five ways to manage arthritis

Arthritis is a painful problem that can interfere with your ability to do the things you enjoy.But you can take steps to manage arthritis by protecting your joints, reducing discomfort, and improving mobility.

Harvard Medical School offers these five suggestions to help with arthritis:

• Keep moving. Avoid holding one position for too long. When working at a desk, for example, get up and stretch every 15 minutes. Do the same while sitting at home reading or watching television.

• Discover your strength. Put your strongest joints and muscles to work. To protect finger and wrist joints, push open heavy doors with the side of your arm or shoulder. To reduce hip or knee stress on stairs, let the strong leg lead going up and the weaker leg lead going down.

• Plan ahead. Simplify and organize your routines so you minimize movements that are difficult or painful. Keep items you need for cooking, cleaning, or hobbies near where they are needed (even if that means multiple sets of cleaning supplies, one for your kitchen and each bathroom, for example).

Read more

Gummy Vitamins or Gummy Bears?

College of Dupage Nursing student Taylor Godbey  discovered that “Each American spends about $100 dollars a year for pills that are often of questionable value” according to Jane E. Brody of The New York Times.

When you are sick and go to the doctor, you don’t question whether what they’re giving you is actually going to help you, right? I don’t at least because I trust them. I trust them because they aren’t only answering to me. They are answering to The Medical Board of Illinois, who sets rules for what medical professionals can and cannot do. One thing they can’t do is give you fake medicine.

What if I told you that’s what vitamin and supplement companies do every day? Brody questioned a Dr. Cohen who stated, “Products continue to be used at the same rate despite major studies demonstrating no benefit over placebo.” Many people take vitamins and supplements everyday not really knowing what is actually in them.

You give them to your children because you’ve been told that it will support their nutrition but in reality they might just be eating glorified gummy bears.

Does this mean that you should just throw all your vitamins or supplements away? Definitely not, but it couldn’t hurt to do some research.

When you eat and how frequently may benefit heart health

What times someone eats during the day and how frequently may play a role in having a healthy weight and heart.According to an American Heart Association scientific statement published Wednesday, eating breakfast, avoiding late-night eating and mindful meal-planning are associated with a lower risk of heart disease, blood vessel diseases and stroke.

However, current research doesn’t dictate the best approach.

“There’s conflicting evidence about meal frequency,” said Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Ph.D., writing group chair and associate professor of nutritional medicine at Columbia University in New York City. She said studies have shown the benefit of intermittent fasting and eating smaller, frequent meals throughout the day.

Fasting every other day helped people lose weight in the short-term, but its long-term effects haven’t been studied, according to the statement. And there’s no guarantee that such fasting can be sustained.

“I can see scenarios where intermittent fasting can backfire,” said Penny Kris-Etherton, Ph.D., R.D., a statement co-author and nutrition professor at Penn State University. For example, people who fast one day could eat more than twice as much the next day, she said. She also questioned what would happen if someone who fasted regularly for lengthy periods of time – weeks or even months – then started eating regularly every day.

Because there’s not a lot of information about how people could practice intermittent fasting, Kris-Etherton cautioned against using it as a weight loss or weight management strategy until further information is available.

Eating frequent meals has also been found to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease risk factors, says St-Onge. One study of men showed that those who ate more than four times a day had a lower risk of obesity than those eating three or fewer times a day. But other studies have found the opposite, with a greater risk of weight gain over time in those reporting eating more frequently. Read more

Is Miso Healthy?

Come and try a kickass goal building workshop with a twist

Join Melissa of Personal Gains, on Friday, February 24, from 7 – 9 PM  at Peak Training, 716 S. Main Street for the “Personal Goals Workshop”, a kickass goal building workshop with a twist! Cocktails & healthy appetizers included. All guests will receive a customizable “Personal Goals Binder” & killer swag bag filled with goodies from local businesses.

Free chair massages, raffle prizes, Infinite Possibilities Candles, DIY essential oil crafts & much more!

Bring a guest, get a special gift.  So, grab your girlfriends, mothers, sisters, co-workers, Starbucks barista, whatever!


The cost is only $5 per person* You can register at:

http://www.getpersonalgains.com/personal-goals-event

 The workshop is free for all Personal Gains’ clients, but you must reserve your spot!

  Client Reservation


 To download an informational flyer, click here.

 

A Veggie Valentine

You may not “carrot”
all for me
The way I care for you.



You may “turnip” your nose
When I plead with you

 


But if your “heart” should”

beet” with mine



Forever “lettuce” hope


There is no reason in the world why we two “Cantaloupe.”


and … if that one made you smile, here’s another:

My love is like a cabbage
Divided into two,
The leaves I give to others,
The heart I give to you.

originally posted in Brownielocks and The 3 Bears
present at https://www.brownielocks.com/valentinepoems.html

Exercise – More Is Not Better
but Something Is Better Than Nothing

Elizabeth Moxley, PhD, RN, BS​​​, and Assistant Professor at the College of Dupage School of Nursing, shared the following great insight about exercise.

The Pandemic of Inactivity – Physical inactivity is a pandemic. It is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality and an estimated 40-80% of all people are currently sedentary. The benefits of physical activity have been known since the early 1950s, but the promotion of activity lags with respect to the evidence. Inactivity has become a chronic disease resulting in chronic complications.

The Benefits of Exercise – Exercise has been dubbed ‘the closest thing there is to a magic bullet’. The Nurse’s Health Study revealed the benefits from exercise are lasting; exercise performed during midlife yielded benefits at age 70. Few medications work that well!

The most important question not to ask-therefore, in this day and age is; what do I need to do to for good health, rather; why doesn’t our society exercise enough? Several obvious reasons exist, such as; a lack of time, sedentary lifestyles, diminished resources for which to engage in exercise, not realizing the extent of health benefits, and simply, not knowing where to begin. A ‘too much exercise hypothesis’ has even emerged regarding safe doses of vigorous-intensity and/or high quantities of exercise. The determination of the perfect dose of exercise is not only not clear – it has nearly become a perfect muddle! However, the evidence clearly demonstrates, any exercise is more beneficial than none at all, and some believe more is better.

Read more