Yoga does more than reduce stress during treatment

Alexander Hantel, M.D., an experienced medical oncologist, shared in Edwards-Elmhurst Healthy Driven Blog that your body was built to move. It’s how you were made. That’s why it’s so important for your health to keep moving — even during cancer treatment.

Newer research has shown that exercise has many benefits during and after treatment. This doesn’t mean you need to hop on a treadmill and train for a 5K. There are less intensive whole body exercises that you can implement into your lifestyle to help improve your mind, body and spirit.

Yoga is a great example. Yoga combines physical postures, breathing exercises and meditation. Poses are designed to encourage relaxation and reduce stress.

Research shows that practicing yoga during cancer treatment has several benefits.Yoga can help boost your mood, improve balance and blood flow. It can also help control physical functions like blood pressure, heart rate, breathing, metabolism and body temperature. Read more

Come and Meet Andre Dawson

Donate and Dine!

Visit Culver’s of Lombard,  at 1155 S. Main St. on MONDAY, MAY 21, from 4 – 8 pm and a percentage of group sales will be donated to
TRINITY CHRISTIAN NURSERY SCHOOL in Villa Park to help in the purchase of new indoor play equipment for preschoolers.

As an added bonus, Culvers have partnered with The Westin Lombard Yorktown Center and its brand-new BABY OTTER ANDRE DAWSON AQUATIC CENTER, that provides a one-of-a-kind water safety & swimming program for children as young as eight months old.

COME MEET & TAKE PICTURES WITH

BABY OTTER AMBASSADOR & BASEBALL HALL OF FAMER ANDRE DAWSON

FROM 5 – 7 pm
(no autographs will be signed)

Please use this link to download the attached filer and bring

it with you in order for the school to receive credit.

 

Even Modest Lifestyle Changes in Middle Age May Significantly Extend Your Life

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Moms Can Help Girls Get Moving

Unfortunately, data suggests that we aren’t. Adolescents need 60 minutes of physical activity every day. However, the 2015 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that only about 27% of high school students participated in at least 60 minutes of physical activity on each of the seven days prior to the survey. Boys (36%) were more likely than girls (17.7%) to get the recommended amount of exercise.

This means that our kids, especially our girls, are missing out on some incredible lifelong health benefits, including lowering their risk for chronic diseases and improving their chances of becoming healthy adults.

Physical activity and sports also make for a healthier, more enjoyable childhood. According to a Women’s Sports Foundation study(link is external), organized sports are associated with children’s general health and body esteem, healthy weight, and educational achievement. Also, children’s involvement in sports is often associated with more harmony, cohesion, and communication with their parent(s). What’s more — girls who are not involved in team sports are less content with their lives than girls who do participate, because sports enhance their quality of life. To me, the message is clear: We need to get more girls moving and signed up to play sports.

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Promote the Paddle

College of DuPage Nursing Student Schyle McKee shared that kayaking and canoeing is a great way to have fun on a sunny summer day. Being on the calm water in a manually propelled vessel can be quite relaxing and it promotes awesome exercise.

There are many ways to enjoy a day on a boat. Float on to the middle of that pond to soak up the sun, racing your buddies who are in the boats that are next to you, casting a line overboard to catch a fish or two. The possibilities go as far as your imagination, which is pretty much endless.

Did you know? It’s easy to burn calories by paddling! The average person burns about 300 calories an hour. Get out there and paddle those calories away! Paddling really gets the heart pumping and the blood flowing too. Getting the heart rate up strengthens the heart muscle making it more efficient. This very good for the rest or your body as well.

Also, when sun rays hit the skin, Vitamin D is made. Vitamin D is needed to help calcium absorption to make bones strong. This form of getting vitamin D is great for all ages. Vitamin D is in very few foods but it could also come from supplements. Why buy supplements, however, when its easy to go outside, jump in your boat, and catch some rays? On the plus side, it’s free AND healthy!

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Go Fly A Kite Was A Success

Thank you to everyone who stop by the Lombard Park District’s Time for Tots and joined us for “Go Fly A KIte!”  We were so fortunate to partner with the Kiwanis Club of Lombard on this activity since both organizations are all about helping kids.

If you could not attend you can still participate and “Go Fly A Kite.”  Seriously, GO FLY A KITE!   April was chosen as National Kite Month because it was the month that perfectly symbolizes hope, potential, and joy.  As the first month in spring, April is the month when we see the last of the snow giving way to green lawns, a month that we are eager to get outside and be active. April is when most kite fliers start to bring their kites out of the closet and prepare for a summer in the park or on the beach.   So why not join in this year?

And, if you like, take a photo of your child with their kite an send it to jay@healthylombard.com for posting on the Healthy Lombard Selfie Page (www.facebook.com/healthylombardselfies) AND on the Kiwanis Club of Lombard website (www.kiwaniscluboflombard.org).

All entries will be entered into a drawing at the end of April. Two winners will be selected at random. The winners will each receive a $25 gift card to Yorktown Mall.

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4 Rules for Exercising with Osteoporosis

Linda Melone shared in the Silver Sneakers online news for Rivity Health that if you have osteoporosis, you may worry that being active means you’re more likely to fall and break a bone. But the opposite is true. Regular exercise with a properly designed program can help prevent falls and fractures. That’s because exercise strengthens bones and muscles, and improves balance, coordination, and flexibility—all key for people with osteoporosis.

The problem is that guidelines for exercising with osteoporosis are not crystal clear. In general, “you want to do exercises that improve or maintain bone density in the way of strength or resistance training and also include impact-style aerobic exercise,” says Karen Kemmis, D.P.T., an expert for the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

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What Your Hair Says About Your Health

Kim Hayes wrote for AARP that while many of us only focus on the aesthetic pleasure of having flowing shiny locks, the fact is that dull, limp strands, or hair loss, can sometimes indicate a health issue. Here are a few conditions to watch out for: Hair loss and graying
While thinning and graying hair can be a standard part of aging for both women and men, a recent study of 2,000 men in India showed that participants who had coronary artery disease were more likely to be prematurely bald or gray. The study, conducted by the European Society of Cardiology on men under 40, discovered that the 50 percent of participants with coronary artery disease were more likely to have gone prematurely gray, versus 30 percent of a healthy control group, the BBC reports. The participants in the heart condition group were also more likely (49 percent) to have male pattern baldness, compared with those in the healthy group (27 percent).

Metabolic or hormonal stress and certain medications can cause hair loss, especially if it is sudden. This condition is called Telogen effluvium, according to Medscape. In a majority of cases, new hair starts growing within six months, but longer durations of the condition also exist.

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4 Ways Strength Training Can Make You An Awesome Runner

Sebastian Gonzales, DC, CSCS, owner and operater of  Performance Place Sports Care & Chiropractic, a sports-injury rehab clinic in Huntington Beach, California, shared with Good Health Update that

The use of power measurements to guide training and improve performance has been around for decades among competitive cyclists—in large part because power meters have been around for years that enable them to measure the force they apply to the crank shaft.

Now that power meters are available for runners, too, people are seeking new ways to build more powerful strides.

If you’re confused about how becoming more powerful can make you a faster runner, let’s start with the difference between power and strength:

  • Strength is the ability to move a load (e.g., your own body) from point A to point B. It could take 10 seconds or 1 second, but strength is not a question of time. It’s strictly about the amount of weight you’re able to move.
  • Power, on the other hand, combines both strength and time. The more powerful your body becomes, the quicker you can move that same weight from point A to point B. It’s as simple as that, and that’s why one of the foundations of power running is strength training.

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Loosen up that tight, achy neck with this stretch from a top physical therapist

K. Aleisha Fetters, in a post by Silver Sneakers for Tivity Health share that Michael Silverman, P.T., director of rehabilitation and wellness at Northern Westchester Hospital in New York. had found that a lot of older adults, whom he calls “seasoned athletes,” experience tension in their necks because of faulty biomechanics.

Most adults have overactive upper traps, which run from the base of the skull to the shoulders, he explains. By keeping your shoulders constantly hunched forward or simply using these muscles when you should be using others, the traps get pulled tighter and tighter. The result: a literal pain in the neck.

What’s more, due to wear, tear, and gravity, the space in between the vertebrae actually decreases through the decades, Silverman says. This can increase aches and pains by lessening shock absorption in the neck.

Fortunately, the solution may be as simple as stretching. Research published in Clinical Rehabilitation shows that a regular stretching routine can reduce pain and improve mobility in adults with chronic neck pain.

Silverman suggests starting with the quick stretch below. By focusing on the sides of your neck, it helps elongate and ease tension in the traps without promoting the head-forward, hunched-over posture we all know too well.

Your 60-Second Solution to a Tight, Achy Neck

Sit tall in a chair, reach your right hand over your head, and place it right above your left ear. From here, gently and slowly pull your right ear toward your right shoulder, feeling a stretch in the left side of your neck. Focus on relaxing and dropping your left shoulder as you do so. Breathe slowly and deeply, holding the stretch for 30 seconds. Repeat on the opposite side. Read more