Apple Crunch Day

SEND US YOUR SELFIE

 

Healthy Lombard invites you to join millions of people around the country on October 13 and crunch into an apple to raise awareness about eating better and supporting local farmers.

Then take a selfie (eating an apple) and send it to us at jay@healthylombard.com.

All submissions will be posted on our Facebook Page and this webpage (no names included) and entered into a drawing to win 1 of 4 gift cards.

Healthy Lombard has celebrated Apple Crunch Day since 2015.

We became involved because we were looking for an activity for the fall that would support our mission of addressing the epidemic of Pediatric Obesity through Awareness, Activities, and Achievement.

Since one of the ways we support our mission is by providing “free-of-charge” activities for youth, Apple Crunch Day was a perfect match.  By the way, the other ways we support our mission are by promoting a healthier lifestyle for everyone through the items on our website, and by providing a platform for community networking and collaboration through our daily calendar, monthly newsletters, social media, and quarterly partners’ meetings. Read more

Healthy Driven Families

At Edward-Elmhurst Health, they take your family’s health as seriously as you do. Through community programs and educational resources, their Healthy Driven Families initiative aims to improve families’ overall health by helping you make intentional choices that lead to a healthier lifestyle. In this post, you will find tools to help you and your family incorporate healthier habits and practices — in the areas of nutrition, exercise, sleep, and mental health — into your daily lives to optimize wellness.

Maintaining a healthy weight

The percentage of children and adolescents affected by obesity in the United States has more than tripled since the 1970s. Childhood obesity can harm a child’s health now and lead to lifelong health problems. Edward-Elmhurst Health offers a variety of services to help combat childhood obesity.

If your child is 15 or younger, Maria Ariza, M.D., a family medicine physician who specializes in childhood obesity medicine, can help your child achieve a healthy weight. Dr. Ariza provides compassionate, personalized care with consideration for your family’s lifestyle.

If your child is 16 and older, the medical weight loss specialists at Endeavor Health® Weight Management provide medical management and lifestyle recommendations. The medically-supervised program is tailored to your child’s metabolism and unique weight issues to help him/her eliminate weight-related health problems.

 

Read more

Help your child overcome childhood obesity

EEHealth shared that in the past 30 years, childhood obesity in the United States has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents. Today, it affects more than one in five children and adolescents, making it the most common chronic disease of childhood.

It’s no wonder the battle over childhood obesity has gained national attention, with September declared as National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month.

Childhood obesity is caused by various genetic, behavioral, and environmental factors. Exposure to unhealthy foods and eating patterns, increased portion size, physical inactivity, socioeconomic status, medications and other factors contribute to this growing national epidemic.

The consequences of obesity during childhood affect a child’s health and well-being now and later in life. Obese youth have a greater risk of heart disease caused by high blood pressure and high cholesterol, and other serious health issues, including:

  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Sleep apnea
  • Asthma
  • Joint problems
  • Fatty liver disease, gallstones, and heartburn
  • Psychological distress (e.g., depression, low self-esteem)

Read more

Help your child overcome childhood obesity

EEHealth shared in its Healthy Driven Blog that in the past 30 years, childhood obesity in the United States has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents. Today, it affects more than one in five children and adolescents, making it the most common chronic disease of childhood.

It’s no wonder the battle over childhood obesity has gained national attention, with September declared as National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month.

Childhood obesity is caused by various genetic, behavioral, and environmental factors. Exposure to unhealthy foods and eating patterns, increased portion size, physical inactivity, socioeconomic status, medications, and other factors contribute to this growing national epidemic.

The consequences of obesity during childhood affect a child’s health and well-being now and later in life. Obese youth have a greater risk of heart disease caused by high blood pressure and high cholesterol, and other serious health issues, including:

  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Sleep apnea
  • Asthma
  • Joint problems
  • Fatty liver disease, gallstones, and heartburn
  • Psychological distress (e.g., depression, low self-esteem)

In addition, children who are obese are 70 percent more likely to become obese adults, increasing the risk for health problems such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, cancer, and osteoarthritis.

Read more

THE IMPORTANCE OF PRESCHOOL PLAY

“Rise and Shine” shared that during the pandemic, many children became accustomed to staying home and only interacting with their immediate family. Sharing and playing with others was a completely foreign concept to a lot of kids. As a result, many parents, teachers, and clinicians have noticed social-emotional delays or gaps in young kids learning basic social skills. But don’t worry, your children are adaptable and are learning, even if they are a little behind. Here are some benefits of preschool play and why you should make sure your children are playing with others.

Lower risk of mental health issues

Now that social and societal activities are returning to a new normal and children can go back to school, it is important that your children are playing and socializing with other peers outside the family. Children learn skills interacting with peers that they may not develop when playing with siblings (e.g., turn-taking, moderating emotional responses or frustration, learning to work with others). Research shows that children who play better with their peers are less likely to have behavioral difficulties in the future. Research also shows that children are less likely to fight with their classmates later in life. Preschool play can also lower the likelihood of mental health problems as children get older because they learn the skills to regulate their emotions and cope with new feelings.

Read more

Free Dental Exams

The DuPage County Health Department Dental Program will come to do Dental Exams for children enrolled in Metropolitan Family Services Early Childhood programming on Monday, September 12th, and Friday, September 16th from 9 AM – 3 PM.

This Dental Exam will meet all the requirements for Early Head Start, Head Start, and Kindergarten required Dental Exams. Children may receive dental cleaning, fluoride treatments, and sealants. 

Metropolitan Family Services is located at 222 E. Willow Ave. Wheaton, IL 60187

For questions contact Angelina Pearson, Phone: 630-784-4878,

Email: pearsona@metrofamily.org 

Read more

MONKEYPOX RISKS FOR CHILDREN

Xiaoyan SongXiaoyan Song, the Chief Infection Control Officer at Children’s National Hospital and a Professor of Pediatrics at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences shared in “Rise and Shine” that monkeypox all over the news lately, you may be wondering about your family’s risk for contracting the virus. So far, the disease, which spreads through close contact, has been found mostly among adults. However, children can still contract the virus so it’s good to be aware of the risk levels of certain activities.

What should I know about monkeypox as my child goes back to school?

Your child still has a low risk of contracting monkeypox, and unlike COVID-19 and flu, monkeypox is unlikely to be spread through brief accidental contacts or interactions. Parents should keep themselves educated about this virus and the rate of transmission. While there is potential for this virus to spread in places like daycares and schools, the risk of your child contracting it from those places is not high.

How can kids spread monkeypox?

There is some spread that happens when in contact with clothing or other objects that have been in direct contact with monkeypox lesions. Making sure that kids are only using items that belong to them is a good way to control the spread (for example, not sharing clothing, blankets, etc.).

Read more

25 Calming Activities For Kids With Anxiety

photo by Caleb WoodsParenting Pod shared an article by Ana (Jovanovic) Sokolovic, a licensed psychotherapist who works with adults, children, and adolescents.  In it, she states that it is perfectly normal for children to experience anxiety as they grow, learn, and change environments. One of the greatest gifts you can give your child is to teach them useful strategies for understanding and tending to this emotion.

This article will give you activities and tools to help your child cope with anxiety. Test them and see which ones help your child.

Do not be surprised if some of them feel good for you too!

Situations, where anxiety is a normal response, include:

  • The unknown
  • A lack of predictability and control
  • Perceived lack of psychical or emotional safety.
  • Separation
  • Loss
  • Illness

Read more

Going To College With Celiac Disease

Rise and Shine Shared that preparing for college is an exciting time, but for many incoming students, this is the first time they are spending a significant amount of time away from home. Students with celiac disease can find this new adventure intimidating since they are having to navigate their disease, food choices, options, and preparation on their own, for the first time, without the support of parents, friends, and family.

Although this may seem overwhelming, you want to make sure your child is prepared and able to follow a gluten-free diet while still enjoying campus living.

Tips for ensuring your child can stick to a gluten-free diet

To ensure your child can stick to a gluten-free diet while living away from your home, make sure:

  1. They have a good understanding of the gluten-free diet and foods that are allowed and not allowed on the diet.
  2. They can read and identify gluten-containing ingredients on a food label.
  3. They understand the risk of cross-contamination and possible places where this can occur.
  4. They are familiar with medications that are gluten-free and safe to take.
  5. They can prepare a few gluten-free meals or snacks.
  6. They can safely order a gluten-free meal when eating at a dining hall, restaurant, or café.

Read more

September Wellness Tips for Dads

Happy black people doing sport practice in city park. African american family with father teaching son how to play football.As a parent, you always want the best for your child—that’s a given. Making sure they’re healthy, happy, and safe are your priorities. But what about your well-being?

Your child deserves a parent that’s doing everything in their power to be the best version of themselves. Why? Because your health and happiness affect your child.

So while you’re reading this article, keep in mind that these tips are for more than just your benefit. It’s for your kids too.

Embrace Your Emotions

Despite the ongoing conversations around mental health stigmas, there’s still a trend of men refusing to talk about their emotions. It could be embarrassment or lack of knowledge on how to begin getting in touch with this side of themselves. According to a Mental Health America infographic, about 6 million men are affected by depression yearly. Moreover, men are four times as likely to die by suicide than women.

Start learning healthy ways to process your emotions—that might mean crying when you feel like you need to or writing down your thoughts. Find what method works best for you, and set a good example for your kid by teaching them healthy outlets for their emotions.

Read more