What Your Hair Says About Your Health

Kim Hayes wrote for AARP that while many of us only focus on the aesthetic pleasure of having flowing shiny locks, the fact is that dull, limp strands, or hair loss, can sometimes indicate a health issue. Here are a few conditions to watch out for: Hair loss and graying
While thinning and graying hair can be a standard part of aging for both women and men, a recent study of 2,000 men in India showed that participants who had coronary artery disease were more likely to be prematurely bald or gray. The study, conducted by the European Society of Cardiology on men under 40, discovered that the 50 percent of participants with coronary artery disease were more likely to have gone prematurely gray, versus 30 percent of a healthy control group, the BBC reports. The participants in the heart condition group were also more likely (49 percent) to have male pattern baldness, compared with those in the healthy group (27 percent).

Metabolic or hormonal stress and certain medications can cause hair loss, especially if it is sudden. This condition is called Telogen effluvium, according to Medscape. In a majority of cases, new hair starts growing within six months, but longer durations of the condition also exist.

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NIH Initiative To Help End The Opioid Crisis

Opioid addiction, misuse and overdose is an ongoing and rapidly evolving public health crisis.  To address the crisis, NIH is launching a comprehensive, trans-NIH Initiative on opioid addiction and pain. This Initiative will build on extensive, well-established NIH research, including basic science of the complex neurological pathways involved in pain and addiction, implementation science to develop and test treatment models, and research to integrate behavioral interventions with Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD). Successes from this research include the development of the nasal form of naloxone, the most commonly used nasal spray for reversing opioid overdose, the development of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid use disorder, and new molecular targets for pain management. Read more

10 Common Food Safety Mistakes

Gloria Kent, the Content Manager for  Recommendedthings.com,  shared that when we eat we often make mistakes which could create problems over a period of time. We avoid some basic safety factors to be kept in mind when it comes to foods. For example, not keeping the food properly stored and closed, not checking on the contents before buying them, not being sure about the expiry dates and other such things could create problems.

It is all about being informed and knowledgeable and we are sharing some of the important food safety mistakes which many of us often make. We are sure it will help a lot in understanding the same and then putting it into practice.

Click on MORE to see a a comprehensive piece on some of the common lapses regarding safety of food items.

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5 Ways Your Financial Health Will Lead to Your Physical Health

Carly Fauth <carlyfauth@moneycrashers.com> shared that “Healthy, wealthy, and wise” is a tall order, but did you know how closely-linked health and wealth actually are? We often see how healthy financially-successful people are. But what if one could not truly exist and be maintained without the other?

Keeping your finances in order and organized can help you stay healthy in a variety of ways. People can (and have) written entire books about this topic since health and personal finance are each complex topics with lots of nuances. As an introduction, though, here are some of the top-level facts that will help get you motivated to find financial and physical prosperity.

Financial Health Will Lead You to Physical Health

  1. Better Access to Health Care

You don’t have to be a bleeding heart liberal to realize that better finances lead to better health care. If you can afford a better insurance plan, you’re more likely to get prompt treatment for injuries and illness, and to be treated by a better-qualified doctor. More importantly, for long-term health, you can afford more preventive medicine. That’s when you go to the doctor for the tests and examinations that spot a pending health problem before it becomes a serious issue

At the most extreme, this can mean the difference between surviving or not because your doctor spotted cancer in time. Less dramatically, it can mean better joint care through early diagnosis, shorter recovery periods, and cheaper treatments for illnesses caught in the introductory stage.

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Google algorithms see heart attack risk by looking at our eyes

The algorithms didn’t outperform existing medical approaches such as blood tests, according to a study of the finding published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering. The work needs to be validated and repeated on more people before it gains broader acceptance, several outside physicians said.

But the new approach could build on doctors’ current abilities by providing a tool that people could one day use to quickly and easily screen themselves for health risks that can contribute to heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide.

“This may be a rapid way for people to screen for risk,” Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist at Yale University who was not involved in the study, wrote in an email. “Diagnosis is about to get turbocharged by technology. And one avenue is to empower people with rapid ways to get useful information about their health.”

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Prescribed an opioid? Ask your doctor (or dentist) these questions

Dr. Sam Ho, Chief Medical Officer, UnitedHealthcare, shared with the Daily Herald that if your doctor or dentist prescribes a pain reliever, take charge of your health and find out exactly what you are getting. UnitedHealth Group medical experts recommend you ask your doctor these questions about any opioid prescription. Common opioid brand names include Vicodin and Percocet.

1. Why do I need this medicine?

Ask your doctor for reasons why it is right for you.

2. Are there other options that will address my pain?

Opioids are not the only option for treating pain. Other options are available. An over-the-counter pain reliever (such as Tylenol®, Aleve® or Advil®) may be enough, or, physical therapy or chiropractic care could give the same results.

3. How long do I take this?

Extended opioid use can increase the risk of dependence and addiction. Talk with your doctor about how long you should take the medicine and whether it should be refilled. Read more

8 Sneaky Offenders that Cause Weight Fluctuations

Julia Malacoff, Julia@jmalacoff is a former fashion editor turned health and fitness buff who writes about all things lifestyle—especially workouts and food. Recently she shared with MyFitness Pal that when you’re working toward a weight-loss goal, it’s normal to be watching the number on the scale like a hawk waiting for any changes that might occur. But if you’ve been tracking your weight for even a few weeks, you’ve probably noticed fluctuations are common. Still, they can be frustrating to see when you’re working hard to get into your best shape ever.

Even for those who aren’t actively trying to lose weight, it can be unwelcome to see the scale jump up. Rest assured, weight changes from one day to the next are generally temporary and, according to experts, they don’t mean you’re not making progress.

Here, find eight explanations for why your weight can spike — straight from nutritionists who help people meet their weight-loss goals every day — that have nothing to do with gaining fat.


It’s true that staying well-hydrated is a good move if you’re trying to lose weight, but the first few days of upping your water intake could actually cause the number on the scale to creep up, too. Why? “Let’s break down what weight really is,” says Megan Ware, RDN. “It is not just the measurement of fat in the body. It is the weight of your bones, organs, muscles, fluid and waste. When you’re dehydrated, you actually weigh less, but that doesn’t mean you are healthier. Let’s say you don’t drink much fluid one day, and the next morning you wake up and your weight is down. Then you drink a ton of water and the next day it looks like you gained 2 pounds. That does not mean you gained 2 pounds of fat; it just means that your body was depleted of water the day before.”

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McDonald’s moves cheeseburgers off Happy Meal menu

Associated Press Retail Reporter Joseph Pisani and video journalist Carrie Antlfinger shared with the Daily Herald newspaper that McDonald’s is taking cheeseburgers and chocolate milk off its Happy Meal menu in an effort to cut down on the calories, sodium, saturated fat and sugar that kids consume at its restaurants.

Diners can still ask specifically for cheeseburgers or chocolate milk with the kid’s meal, but the fast-food company said that not listing them will reduce how often they’re ordered. Since it removed soda from the Happy Meal menu four years ago, orders for it with Happy Meals have fallen 14 percent, the company said. Hamburgers and Chicken McNuggets will remain the main entrees on the Happy Meal menu. Read more

Cider Vinegar For Arthritis

There is no doubt that arthritis is a highly painful and even debilitating joint problem and it usually occurs to people as they age. Hence it would be interesting to learn how to treat this problem naturally.

Evelyn Sherman, the Content Manager for Steroidsmag.com  shared with Healthy Lombard a few proven and time tested ways and means by which it is possible to fight off and perhaps manage effectively arthritis with the use of cider vinegar we think you will find interesting.

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Research explores how fats affect our bodies

Patrick B. Massey, MD, PH.D., medical director for complementary and alternative medicine at Alexian Brothers Hospital Network and president of ALT-MED Medical and Physical Therapy, 1544 Nerge Road, Elk Grove Village wrote for the Daily Herald Newspaper that over the past two decades there has been a lot of research on the role that specific fats have on the risk of developing various chronic diseases especially heart disease, diabetes and recently Alzheimer’s disease.

The results are far from definitive and it seems that the more research is produced, the cloudier the answers become.

A recent medical study took a different approach. They tried to determine whether specific types of fats increase the absorption of one specific highly inflammatory and toxic compound lipopolysaccharide (LPS), found in the walls of some bowel bacteria.

There are three basic classifications of fats: saturated fats which are solid at room temperature like butter, lard and coconut oil; unsaturated fats which are liquid at room temperature like olive oil; trans fats that are not found in great quantity in nature and never belong in your diet.

Unsaturated fats are divided again into two classes, omega-3 and omega-6. These fats are further divided into monounsaturated (olive oil) and polyunsaturated (corn oil) fats.

In general, saturated fats increase inflammation and unsaturated fats reduce inflammation. However, not all unsaturated fats may reduce inflammation.

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