Top 5 Exercises to Increase Height For Kids

Gregory Brown, a chief editor at ConstructMuscles.com, shared that if you have a child, you need to prioritize for him to grow healthy and strong. What we want for the child is to start making fitness a habit. We need to teach them that sleep is important, eating is the way to go and grow, and exercising is just as fun as playing with your friends. We can always teach kids how to live in the fitness world by having fun and breaking a sweat.

It is a saying that when you put yourself in physical stress all the time while you are young, your growth spurt will lessen. It is time to put that nonsense to rest. We are going to show you Exercises that will allow your kids to get taller, and make them grow up healthier each day. We are going to take it easy, and see how the children will have fun while getting their fitness fix.

Exercises For Kids

What we are going to see on this article are exercises that you can do anywhere and anytime. They are functional movements that can be done under time-controlled pace. Think about as a High Intensity Interval Training without the “High Intensity.” What we will focus on is for the children to have fun, and not make them feel groggy or tired. The youth are always full of energy, and they can do this every single day before or after they go to school.

  1. Jumping Jacks

In any fitness center you go to, you barely see people do the Jumping Jacks. It is one great warm-up movement to get your blood running about. For Kids, it is all about stretching their arms, legs, and spine.

  • To perform this, jump and spread your limbs wide open, but not sudden to avoid any injuries.
  • You can clap at the top of your head, or just fully stretch out your arms above your head.
  • While the limbs are spread out, the legs should be beyond hip-width apart.
  • Then, back to standing tall.

It is such an easy warm-up, yet it is fun to do for kids. You don’t need any equipment, but a decent amount of space for you and your kid to move around.

 

  1. Hanging on The Playground Bars

It is also a great chance for you and your young one to have a bonding session. Just guide your child through the Jungle Gym bars. The reason for them to do it, is to have the same purpose of stretching their limbs and spine. You don’t need to do it on a daily basis. Just be cautious of your child’s surroundings to avoid hurting the others. It is one of those exercises that you can do on a DIY Pull-Up Bar if you have one at home.

 

  1. Squat Jumps

Another functional movement that is applicable to any demographic available. Tell your child or your younger sibling that even strong athletes do it to motivate them to exercise with you. Studies show that, jumping can boost your child’s growth and bones. It is the reason that some kids want to play basketball, so that they can grow as tall as the professionals that we see on TV.

  • Just tell them squat down, like how they would sit on a chair,
  • Then, jump as high as you can and repeat the process.

Tip: add a game to it such as, “

 

4. Stretching Movements

When you get to wake your kid up in the morning, try to ask them nicely to try and reach their toes. It will lengthen their hamstring muscles, and get a good stretch to their healthy spine. It is a good practice to get their mobility done. Then, after they try to reach for their toes, make them reach for the ceiling and tell them to reach for the sky.

Since there isn’t much movements involved besides stretching, accompany them while you are at it. On the first days, they might not be ecstatic to do it, until they get curious and do it with you.

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How to Prevent Strength Training Injuries

Lou Schuler wrote for Tivity Health’s Silver Sneakers  shares the following insightful story:

The kid flying around the gym was in fantastic shape, no doubt about it. After lifting, jumping onto a stack of boxes, and running sprints while pushing a weighted sled, he barely looked like he was breathing hard. I’d guess he was 20, one-third my age, and as I watched him, all I could think of was how many parts of my body would explode if I attempted his workout.

It’s a lesson I learned the hard way—several times. All it took was a knee injury from jumping, pulled muscles from sprints, an injured elbow from lifting fast, and worst of all, a back injury from the time I continued lifting heavy weights even though I knew something was off that day.

You can learn from my mistakes, and from the advice of my friend Chad Waterbury, D.P.T., a physical therapist and veteran personal trainer based in Santa Monica, California.

“Any injury is avoidable,” Waterbury says. The trick, as I know all too well, is to understand what not to do before you do it.

Start by checking with your doctor before beginning a new fitness program. Then, follow these tips to ensure that avoidable injuries are actually avoided. Read more

Learning to balance school and sports

Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago shared with the Daily Herald Newspaper that as another school year gets under way, kids’ sports teams are also kicking back into full gear.When activities and school work start competing for your child’s attention and time, it can be overwhelming to balance it all.

While the benefits of playing sports far outweigh the negative aspects, according to Dr. Rebecca Carl, an attending physician in the Institute for Sports Medicine, there are certain precautions that all parents should take into account as they sign their kids up for another year of practices and games.

Keep the main purpose of sports in mind

Organized sports are meant to be a way for kids to stay fit and socialize with their peers. For the most part, they’re not meant to be training for careers in professional sports.

Some teams focus on building skills, not necessarily winning games or going to tournaments, which often can become the main objectives for many travel teams.

Consider what type of team is best for you

Getting involved in more than one sport is good

Keeping a check on the competitiveness of your child’s sport can make it easier to help them split their time between a few different activities.

“Sports specialization,” which occurs when kids play just one sport year-round, can lead to injuries for young athletes.

When a child specializes in one particular sport early on, they use the same muscles and joints repeatedly. Kids are at risk for certain types of overuse injuries because their developing skeletons are vulnerable to growth plate injuries.

As the demands on kids to play one specific sport more frequently increase, so does the rate of injury.

To head off overuse injuries, Dr. Carl recommends that kids participate on no more than one team each season, though it’s OK if seasons overlap a little.

They should also have one to two days a week to rest without any practices or games.

“Children who are involved in competitive sports every day of the week aren’t just at risk for overuse injuries. They’re also at of risk burning out,” says Dr. Carl.

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How You Walk Could Flag Mental Decline

   Sumathi Reddy shared the following story recently in Wall Street Journal:

David Victor is strolling up and down a walkway at a steady pace, reciting alternate letters of the alphabet aloud.

The 20-foot walkway the 73-year-old is on is embedded with pressure sensors that track every step he takes: his velocity, his cadence, how long his foot remains in the air. The measures pop up on a computer screen here in a laboratory at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Later, Mr. Victor will repeat the exercises with a device on his head that measures his brain function in real time.

Gait, or how people walk, is increasingly viewed as an important indicator of health for elderly people. Changes in gait have been associated with an increased risk for falling and other health outcomes. And researchers have discovered that slowing down or walking more erratically can predict later cognitive impairments, even dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, more than a decade before symptoms appear.

Roee Holtzer, a professor of neurology at Albert Einstein and Yeshiva University and Joe Verghese, director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for the Aging Brain, are collaborating on several research projects to shed light on the relationship between gait and cognition and how to improve them.

“We are treating walking abilities as an extension of brain function,” Dr. Verghese says.

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Ten Things to Carry When Hiking with Kids

Trails.com share that hiking with kids presents an exciting way to hike. It can also create a new challenge. With a little preparation and the following ten essential items, you and your children are sure to have a great hike.

Toilet paper

This will come in handy for the obvious use, but it can also be used for runny noses.

First Aid Kit

Stock your first aid kit will all the usual suspects, including Bandaids, ointment and anti-itch cream.

Hand Wipes

Your child will inevitably play in the dirt, pick up rocks and get dirty on the trail. Having wipes ready will ensure your child is not ingesting dirt (which can be harmful) by cleaning his or her hands before eating.

Drinks

Be sure kids stay well-hydrated during a hike. Consider bringing drinks they enjoy, like fruit drinks or hot chocolate (for colder hikes). To encourage children to drink water, try equipping them with a hydration pack. Kids may find this more “fun” to drink from and result in them drinking more water with less parental encouragement.

Plastic Bags

Bring at least two. One bag will be used for trash. The other bag can be used to carry any “collectibles” your child finds along the trail and wants to keep.

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Is It Better to Shower at Night in the Summer?

Eradicate the Odor

Most people shower to remove or prevent body odor. That odor is produced in part by sebum, an oil the skin manufactures to keep it moisturized. When you shower, you remove the sebum from the skin—along with all the dirt it can collect. Hot showers further strip the skin of sebum, dirt and potentially offensive odor.

“That’s why people are inclined to shower more frequently in summer,” when sunblock and sweat may add to that tacky, dirty feeling, Dr. Ogunleye says. However, she adds, “lotion may marginally attract more dirt, but not enough to make a huge difference as far as odor.”

While the cultural norm in the U.S. is to shower at least once a day, typically in the morning, showering habits are actually more tied to culture than many would suspect. “There is some evidence to suggest that different ethnicities produce different levels of sebum,” the dermatologist says. “Some people shower every night because that was what their family did,” she says.

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What Your Gait Says About How You’re Aging

Lou Schuler  shared this storyi n Silver Sneakers:

I grew up, like so many of my fellow boomers, in fear of turning into my parents. And like so many of us, I used that fear as motivation to eat better, exercise more, use sunscreen, and age as gracefully as possible. But long after my parents’ generation passed the torch to us, I still feel that dread. Not of getting old—I vastly prefer it to the alternative—but of looking old.

That thought came back to me on a recent Saturday morning in the grocery store. It seemed like all the older people pushing carts had a similar side-to-side movement in their hips and shoulders when they walked. As they stepped forward with the right leg, they would lean to the left. On the next step, they’d lean to the right as they moved the left leg.

The walking pattern is so common it has a name: Trendelenburg gait. It’s often seen in older adults who need or have recently undergone a hip replacement, which makes sense since the signature feature is an inability to hold the hips level when walking.

“With women, the pelvis will literally go side to side, like a bell,” says Michael Stare, D.P.T., a physical therapist and owner of Spectrum Fitness Consulting in Beverly, Massachusetts. With men, you’re more likely to notice that their upper torso leans over the supporting leg when the other leg comes off the ground.

You can picture it like this, Stare says: Imagine an elderly couple walking down an extremely narrow hallway that’s just been painted. The woman with Trendelenburg will end up with paint on her hips, while the man with Trendelenburg will have paint on his shoulders. But it’s still the same thing, and it has real consequences.

Fortunately, by doing a few simple exercises regularly, you can help avoid the age-related changes in gait and the problems associated with them. More on that later.

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99 Amazing Pre-Workout Snacks to Crush Your Next Workout

Danica @ Health Listed asked Healthy Lombard if we would like to share the following info. with our readers and we replied “YES!!”   However, we don’t really have room to post her entire article so here’s a  link to the list as well as some fantastic background data she shared .

99 Amazing Pre-Workout Snack Ideas

 

Danica also shared  that as a workout enthusiast, your main goal is to get your body in the absolute best shape possible.While hitting the gym and going for a run will obviously test your body’s strength and fitness level, the kind of food that you eat is equally important to the entire process.  In fact, we argue that it’s the most important.

Eating a healthy, well-balanced snack or meal before you start getting sweaty is one of the best ways to prep yourself for an intense workout.In this epic guide, Danica will show you 99 different recipes for pre-workout snacks that you can easily make no matter your skills in the kitchen. And … you can even filter the entire list by diet preference and workout type!​

Why Pre-Workout Nutrition is Important – Fitness freaks and body-builders everywhere always seem to put a great deal of focus on post-workout meals, but what you put into your body before you start working out deserves just as much attention. Filling your body with proper nutrition prior to working out will allow you to see considerable gains throughout your entire body, and this is something that’s absolutely necessary if your main goal is to build up your precious muscles. Additionally, eating a nutritious snack before even touching a dumbbell will give your body the energy it needs to keep moving in order to set a new PR.

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Want to Lose Weight? Do These 6 Things at Every Meal

Jenny Sugar from POPSUGAR shared that before you lift that spoon, fork, or cup up to your lips, make sure you’re doing these things every time you sit down to eat.

  1. Drink this: Grab a big glass of water and drink half of it before even starting your meal. It’ll help you feel fuller faster, so you’ll eat less.
  2. Your mama was right: Make sure to eat veggies at every. Single. Meal. Yes, even breakfast! Throw broccoli and beans in your smoothie, some mushrooms and tomatoes into your omelet, or zucchini into your oatmeal. And for either lunch or dinner, make your meal one enormous salad — it’s an easy way to fill up without eating tons of calories. Aim for half your plate to be filled with veggies, and use grains and protein to accent that meal.
  3. This is the magic combo: Woman can’t live on carbs alone, and if you tend to feel groggy after your morning bowl of cereal or your midday pasta, this is why. Fiber and protein are both a must. Fiber makes you feel full for longer and protein will sustain your energy and also help keep hunger at bay. Figure out a combo that adds up to at least 25 grams of fiber and between 50 and 100 grams of protein per day (depending on your activity level).
  4. Calories count: Keep each meal between 300 and 550 calories. This will allow for two 150-calorie snacks and ensure you’re not dipping below 1,200 calories, which can make losing weight impossible.

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FREE ATTENDANCE TICKETS for Students on 7/26/17 at the DuPage County Fair

Join FORWARD

for Get in the Action Day

at the DuPage County Fair   

July 26, 2017 10am-4pm


To obtain a free ticket, please click here.

To download the schedule shown below, click here.


SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES:

Healthy Bingo  (THIS IS A  DOUBLE TICKET HEALTHY  LOMBARD FLAT APPLE ACTIVITY!)
Where: Outside Building 1
When: 9:30am-2pm

Activity: Come play a game of active “healthy bingo” for all ages to move together and have fun. Winners will be rewarded with an edible treat while prizes last!


Soccer/Football/La Crosse/Nerf Battles/Obstacle Course
Where: North End of Fairgrounds
When: 9:30am-3pm

Activity: Fun for kids of all ages! Join the Wheaton Park District for exciting teaching skills and drills throughout the day.

  • 9:30am Nerf Battles
  • 11:00am LaCrosse Clinic
  • 12:00pm Nerf Battles
  •  1:00pm Soccer Clinic
  • 2:00pm Flag Football Clinic

Cooking Demonstration
Where: Building 2
When: 10am-12pm

Activity: Join us for a culinary experience. Chef/Instructor Chris Thielman will teach everyone how to prepare delicious and healthy recipes.

  • 10:00am Low Fat Chicken Quesadillas
  • 10:30am Kale Salad
  • 11:00am Low Fat Chicken Quesadillas
  • 11:30am Kale Salad

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