Early Childhood Event – November 13

You are invited to come and hear Dr. Dana Suskind on November 14, 2018, speak on “Thirty Million Words: Building a Child’s Brain”   at the Glen Ellyn Public Library, 400 Duane Street  Glen Ellyn

You will learn why the single most important thing you can do for your child’s future success in life is to talk to them. Dr. Dana Suskind, a pediatric physician, author, and founder of the Thirty Million Words Initiative will discuss what nurtures the brains of our youngest so they can reach optimum intelligence. 

Don’t miss this special opportunity to learn about the critical importance of early language exposure and the techniques that put the science into practice. We’ll uncover strategies to enhance the home and educational environment in ways that optimize a child’s brain development and their ability to learn. 

Participants will understand the power of language and discover how parents can tune in, talk more, and take turns building a child’s brain to help them reach their full potential. Continuing education credits are always available at these free programs.   Read more

The healthiest diet?

The Nutrition Action Newsletter that if you want to protect your heart, eat more fruits and veggies, and cut unhealthy carbs, one of the healthiest diets—it’s endorsed by the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology, and other health authorities—is DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension).

That’s because a DASH-style diet is low in saturated fat, sugar, and salt, and rich in fruits and vegetables. It’s also rich in nutrients like potassium, magnesium, calcium, and fiber.

In 1997, a landmark study found that a DASH diet could lower blood pressure as well as some prescription drugs. That news was a bombshell because high blood pressure (hypertension) is a major risk factor for heart attacks and strokes.

The OmniHeart study diets

Then, in 2005, came another news flash. The OmniHeart study reported that two variations of the DASH diet were even better for your heart than the original:

The higher-protein variation replaced some of DASH’s carbs with protein—half from plant sources (like beans, peas, and nuts) and a half from animal foods (like fish, lean poultry, and low-fat dairy). Read more

Experimental Nasal Influenza Vaccine Tested in Kids, Teens

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shared  that an early-stage clinical trial testing the safety and immune-stimulating ability of an experimental nasal influenza vaccine in healthy 9- to 17-year-old children and teens has begun enrolling participants at a Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU) site at Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. The VTEU is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Annual vaccination against influenza is recommended for everyone over six months of age. However, because the flu virus changes from year to year, vaccines must be reformulated annually to take account of those changes. When mismatches occur, vaccine effectiveness may suffer. “We are hopeful that newer kinds of influenza vaccines, such as the candidate being tested in this trial, will provide protection even if their components do not precisely match the currently circulating influenza virus strains,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D.

Principal investigator Daniel Hoft, M.D., Ph.D., leads the clinical trial, which will enroll 50 participants. Half will receive the candidate nasal vaccine and the other half will receive a dose of inactive saline solution delivered as a nasal spray. Neither the study staff nor volunteers will know whether a participant has received the experimental

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Key To Good Weight Management

Aileen Waldschmidt, LDN, RD, a licensed, registered dietitian and Bariatric Program Coordinator with Edward-Elmhurst Health shared in their blog that most of us know that what we eat matters if we want to keep our hearts healthy. As a result, we try to make healthy choices, like passing up the salt shaker or ordering a fruit salad instead of those greasy fries.For many, the most difficult part of keeping a heart-healthy relationship with food is getting to a healthy weight and staying there. People may try one of the latest fad diets or one of the impossible-sounding crash diets that celebrities often promote.

The challenge is separating facts from the hype about what’s effective and safe for weight management and heart health. That’s when consulting a weight management professional can help.

The key to any good weight management program is tailoring the approach to the individual. Some people who consult a dietitian may just need to tweak their food choices and exercise habits, while others may need a lifestyle overhaul which includes smoking cessation and stress management.

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Does coffee help brew a healthy heart?

Mary Gardner, RD, LDN, an outpatient dietitian at Edward Hospital, shared in the Edwards-Elmhurst Health Blog that coffee was long considered something of a guilty pleasure. After all, it’s how we start our days: “The best part of waking up is Folgers in your cup!” Yet, one too many cups of coffee could give you the jitters and, if it’s late in the day, interfere with a good night’s sleep.The pros and cons of drinking coffee have been up for debate, with some experts saying to avoid the beverage because it could be harmful to your health. In recent years though, researchers have been looking at the flip side: What positive impact might those cups of joe have on a person’s health?

More studies will be needed to establish a clear cause and effect relationship between coffee and heart health, but there’s an extensive body of research linking coffee consumption to a reduced risk for heart-related problems, including heart failure, stroke and coronary artery disease, which can eventually block an artery and cause a heart attack.

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Any kind of regular physical activity can lengthen your life

 

 huge international study has confirmed that physical activity may really be the best medicine.

Moving, lifting, walking, sweeping, scrubbing, or doing almost anything physical for the equivalent of at least 30 minutes five times a week can cut your risk of dying by at least 20 percent, compared with being less active.

The Study

More than 130,000 healthy men and women aged 35 to 70 from urban and rural areas of 17 countries, including Canada, Brazil, Turkey, Zimbabwe, China, and Poland, volunteered to fill out questionnaires about their regular physical activity. None had cardiovascular disease.

Over the next seven years, those who reported being physically active for 2 ½ to 12 ½ hours a week were 20 percent less likely to die. Those who were active more than 12 ½ hours a week were 35 percent less likely to die.

The physical activity included housework, walking to work, job-related exertion, as well as jogging or going to the gym. It all counted toward better health.

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Why extra weight—not just obesity—matters

 

“American adults just keep getting fatter.”  New data shows that nearly 40 percent of them were obese in 2015 and 2016, a sharp increase from a decade earlier, federal health officials reported Friday.” True, but that’s not the whole story.

It is troubling that almost 40 percent of adults have obesity. But most media reports neglected to mention that the rest of us aren’t exactly trim.  If you add the roughly 30 percent of adults who are overweight, now you’re talking 70 percent of Americans who are carrying around extra pounds.

Granted, it’s obesity—not overweight—that has soared since around 1980. And yes, having obesity puts you at greater risk of disease than being overweight. But being overweight is far from harmless.

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Why Therapy is Essential for Treating Addiction

September is National Recovery Month. Tricia Moceo is passionate about sharing her story, as a mom in recovery, through writing and spreading awareness on addiction. Following is an article she composed for Healthy Lombard.

Most people assume the remedy for recovery involves detox and abstinence from the drugs/alcohol. The truth is, this is only the beginning. Recovery is a lifelong process, one that requires discipline and most importantly intensive treatment and therapy. Addiction is usually a symptom of an underlying issue such as trauma, abuse, grief, and many other mental health disorders. Addiction has been named “disease of the brain”. This complicated idea suggests that the issue stems from the brain. Complex and often confusing, this disease attacks the thinking and behaviors of an individual. Therapy is one of the most useful tools utilized to promote long-term sobriety.

There are many different types of therapy integrated into the recovery process. Almost all addiction programs recognize this and have found that there is not a one size fits all method to this approach. Behavioral therapy is perhaps the most effective in treating the root of addiction and preventing cravings and relapse. However, there are many different forms of therapy. The goal is to identify and address the fundamental issues the addict may be facing. For centuries, therapy has been used for treating addiction of all sorts. Read more

There’s no place like home

College of DuPage Nursing Student Erin O’Loughlin researched that the DuPage County Department of Economic Development and Planning reported in 2011 that 11.4% of DuPage County’s population are senior citizens. A senior citizen is anyone at or over the age of 65. Seniors can experience overall wellness through diet, exercise, healthy lifestyle, and other health promoting activities. However, some seniors begin to need more help with everyday life and health in order to remain living in their home safely. DuPage County is fortunate enough to a vast amount of resources and professionals to help seniors remain safe at home.

DuPage County Community Services has a Senior Services department to assist seniors to remain at home by using supportive resources. These support resources can include transportation vouchers, home care workers, adult day care, life alert buttons, food pantries, support groups, senior centers, senior activity groups, Meals on Wheels, and more. Low income residents can be assessed and educated about different state and county services. The county can also provide information about private services. According to Nursing Economics, these kinds of resources have been shown to help seniors improve thinking and reasoning, improve senior depression, reduce episodes of incontinence, decrease pain, and increase activities of daily living. Seniors may even qualify for routine home visits. Read more

What Is a Heart Attack?

The National Institute on Aging shared that a heart attack happens when the flow of oxygen-rich blood in one or more of the coronary arteries, which supply the heart muscle, suddenly becomes blocked, and a section of heart muscle can’t get enough oxygen. The blockage is usually caused when a plaque ruptures. If blood flow isn’t restored quickly, either by a medicine that dissolves the blockage or a catheter placed within the artery that physically opens the blockage, the section of heart muscle begins to die.

Heart attacks are a leading killer of both men and women. Each year, more than 1 million people in the United States have a heart attack, and about half of them die. Half of those who die do so within 1 hour of the start of symptoms and before reaching the hospital.

A heart attack is an emergency. Learn the warning signs of a heart attack. The signs can include:

  • Crushing chest pain or pressure and/or discomfort or pain elsewhere in the upper body, neck, or arms
  • Nausea
  • A cold sweat
  • Fainting or lightheadedness
  • Shortness of breath

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