Be Your Best

 

Get the Upper Hand On Age Spots

Cheryl Bond-Nelms, AARP, shared that we all know what age spots look like — tiny brown dark spots that can develop on your hands and face. We think they come from growing older, but they are actually a sign of sun damage or fluctuations in hormones.

The medical treatments that can effectively fade or permanently remove dark spots include lasers, chemical peels and microdermabrasion, but you can also remove those spots naturally with items in your kitchen.

Here are seven products that may already be in your pantry or refrigerator that can naturally and effectively fade dark spots or age spots on your hands and face.

1. Lemon juice

Using lemon juice to combat age spots is really a no-brainer. The citric acid and vitamin C in lemon make it the perfect natural bleaching agent. Test your skin first to see if you are sensitive to lemon juice at full strength. If the pure lemon juice is too harsh for your skin, you can dilute it with water.

Take one lemon, water and a cotton ball. Squeeze the lemon into a bowl and add equal parts of water. Use the cotton ball to apply the mixture directly to the areas with dark spots on your face and hands. Leave on for about 20 minutes and then rinse with water, but don’t use soap. Do this at least a couple of nights a week to allow the lemon juice time to fade the spots and even out your skin tone.

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Brain Health Is Connected to Heart Health

The Center for Disease control shared asks, “Did you know that the health of your brain and your heart are connected?” By keeping your heart healthy, you also lower your risk for brain problems such as stroke and dementia. Learn more about the connection between the heart and brain and steps to take to keep both healthy.

Your heart pumps blood through vessels to every part of your body, including your brain. Damage to blood vessels can lead to serious health conditions such as heart disease, stroke, and dementia. Keeping your blood vessels healthy can help you have a strong heart and brain.

Unhealthy Heart, Unhealthy Brain

Some health conditions and unhealthy habits can damage blood vessels, putting your heart and your brain at risk for serious problems.

    • heart attack happens when plaque buildup or a blood clot blocks blood flow to the heart.
    • stroke, sometimes called a “brain attack,” happens when a clot or a plaque blocks a blood vessel in the brain or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts. When this happens, brain tissue dies, which can lead to memory loss and disability.
    • A type of dementia called vascular dementia can happen as a result of a series of small, “silent” strokes, sometimes called “mini-strokes.”1Dementia can cause memory loss, slowed thinking, and personality changes.

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5 Warning Signs of Pancreatic Cancer

Kim Hayes, AARP shared that loss of appetite and unintended weight loss can be warning signs of pancreatic cancer.

Although pancreatic cancer can be treated if caught early, the signs are often subtle, and the disease is usually missed until it is in later, more serious stages. But there are some warning signs that you can watch out for.

The pancreas has two main jobs in the body: to make juices that help digest food and to make hormones, such as insulin and glucagon, that help control blood sugar levels. The digestive juices are made by exocrine pancreas cells, which is where about 95 percent of pancreatic cancers begin. The disease accounts for approximately 3 percent of all cancers and about 7 percent of all cancer deaths, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), and the risk goes up with age. About two-thirds of patients are at least 65 years old, and the average age at the time of diagnosis is 71, according to the ACS.

Only 8.2 percent of pancreatic cancer patients survive for five years, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The pancreas is deep inside the body, and early tumors can’t be detected by standard physical exams. People usually have no symptoms until the cancer has already spread to other organs. Even so, the NCI advises people to consult their doctor if they have any of the following symptoms:

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Can what you eat prevent Alzheimer’s?

Nina Lundberg, MD wrote for the Edwards-Elmhurst blog that as we age, our brains get a little slower on the draw.

You might forget where you put your keys, or what time your appointment is. You may even forget what day it is or the name of a famous actor you like, but you recover and remember fairly quickly.When your memory loss disrupts your daily life – you can’t retrace your steps and find your missing keys, or you can’t tell what season it is – it could be a sign of Alzheimer’s disease.

Your next question may be: how do I prevent this from happening to me?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a clear-cut prevention method. Alzheimer’s disease and dementia evolve because of a combination of factors such as your age, genetics, medical conditions and environment.

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Can Apple Cider Vinegar Fix All Your Problems?

KATE CHYNOWETH shared in the MYFITENESSPAL Blog that Spring cleaning isn’t just for closets. After months of cold weather and cravings for rich meals, our bodies deserve a reset. Thanks in part to an ever-expanding selection of health drinks, this question burns as intensely for some as a teaspoon of ACV on a sore throat. Rumors are its health benefits include everything from increased energy and weight loss to improved digestion. Yet many of the claims associated with it remain unproven, so let’s to take a closer look at the trend.

 

IT IS GOOD FOR GUT FLORA

Unpasteurized apple cider vinegar is rich in enzymes and probiotics, much like other raw fermented liquids such as kombucha. Probiotics aid digestion, keep us “regular” and prevent bloating (as yogurt commercials have informed us for years). Yet those benefits only are gained if you ingest the raw stuff sold by all-natural producers such as Bragg, because pasteurization kills probiotic strains. You’ll know you’ve hit the jackpot when you see cobwebby strands of the “mother” floating in your bottle of amber liquid. If you’re looking for a way to wake up and energize your digestion, a morning shot of apple cider vinegar might make sense.

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The Number 1 Sleep Mistake

When your schedule is all over the place, your circadian rhythm, or body clock, doesn’t have a chance to normalize. Your internal body clock is one of the most important factors driving sleepiness and wakefulness, Joseph Ojile, M.D., medical director of the Clayton Sleep Institute, tells SELF. “When [your life and circadian rhythm] line up correctly, you have a much better chance of getting to sleep and getting up when you want,” Ojile says. If you don’t have a consistent schedule, your body struggles to give you the right cues when you need them. Read more

Prevent Mosquito Bites

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention shared that the most effective way to avoid getting sick from viruses spread by mosquitoes when at home and during travel is to prevent mosquito bites.

Mosquito bites can be more than just annoying and itchy. They can spread viruses that make you sick or, in rare cases, cause death. Although most kinds of mosquitoes are just nuisance mosquitoes, some kinds of mosquitoes in the United States and around the world spread viruses that can cause disease.

Mosquitoes bite during the day and night, live indoors and outdoors, and search for warm places as temperatures begin to drop. Some will hibernate in enclosed spaces, like garages, sheds, and under (or inside) homes to survive cold temperatures. Except for the southernmost states in North America, mosquito season starts in the summer and continues into fall.

Prevention

  • Use insect repellent: When used as directed, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breastfeeding women. Use an EPA-registered insect repellent with one of the following active ingredients:
    • DEET
    • Picaridin
    • IR3535
    • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE)
    • Para-menthane-diol (PMD)
    • 2-undecanone
  • Cover up: Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Keep mosquitoes outside: Use air conditioning, or window and door screens. If you are not able to protect yourself from mosquitoes inside your home or hotel, sleep under a mosquito bed net.

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Cancer Fighting Foods

 

Evelyn Sherman, a member of  the content team at Steroidsmag, is an ardent health lover, and writer who shares information about health supplements, does product reviews ,and also shares awesome tips on living a healthy life.

In today’s article, Evelyn talks about how Cancer and food habits have a close link and that this has been proved over and over again. Hence it is important to choose the foods we eat carefully. We are pleased to share below top 12 cancer fighting foods and we are sure it will go a long way in helping you and your family members to stay healthy. These foods are rich in antioxidants, vitamins and minerals and when they are consumed regularly they could help a lot in preventing various forms of cancers. The foods mentioned below have been chosen after quite a bit of research and therefore they will be useful in more ways than one.

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Coping With Multiple Sclerosis—For Patients and Caregivers

Rebecca Evans@GeriatricNursing.org, a registered nurse,and a health writer, honors March as  Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month by compositing the follow blog to share with the readers of our blog:

For individuals diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, the diagnosis can be both scary (after all, what does multiple sclerosis really mean?) and a relief (the thing that has been haunting your life finally has a name).

After that diagnosis, however, there can be a transition period, where you struggle to figure out what your treatment and management plan should look like—and where the people in your life struggle to figure out how to act around you, and how to best help you.

That transition period can be incredibly difficult, frustrating, and stressful. Hopefully this article can help you both as you make the transition.

After all, MS patients need help and support—support friends and family often want to give, but may not know how. Consider this a beginning as you start the dialogue with your friends and family.

 

Communication and Education

When a diagnosis is first made, you, your friends, and your family may all have a lot of reading to do. What is MS? What are the symptoms? What are the treatments? What’s the long-term prognosis?

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