Wash Your Hands

The Center for Disease Control shared that handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself, your family, and others from getting sick.

Washing your hands with soap and water is simple and easy. More importantly, it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of germs. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community—from your home and workplace to childcare facilities and hospitals.

When should you wash your hands?
You can help yourself and others stay healthy by washing your hands often, especially during these key times when germs are likely to get on your hands and can easily spread to you or others:

Washing hands
Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds.

Hand sanitizer
If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Before, during, and after preparing food
Before eating food
Before and after caring for someone who is sick
Before and after treating a cut or wound
After using the toilet
After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
After touching garbage
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Go Fly A Kite Was A Success

Thank you to everyone who stop by the Lombard Park District’s Time for Tots and joined us for “Go Fly A KIte!”  We were so fortunate to partner with the Kiwanis Club of Lombard on this activity since both organizations are all about helping kids.

If you could not attend you can still participate and “Go Fly A Kite.”  Seriously, GO FLY A KITE!   April was chosen as National Kite Month because it was the month that perfectly symbolizes hope, potential, and joy.  As the first month in spring, April is the month when we see the last of the snow giving way to green lawns, a month that we are eager to get outside and be active. April is when most kite fliers start to bring their kites out of the closet and prepare for a summer in the park or on the beach.   So why not join in this year?

And, if you like, take a photo of your child with their kite an send it to jay@healthylombard.com for posting on the Healthy Lombard Selfie Page (www.facebook.com/healthylombardselfies) AND on the Kiwanis Club of Lombard website (www.kiwaniscluboflombard.org).

All entries will be entered into a drawing at the end of April. Two winners will be selected at random. The winners will each receive a $25 gift card to Yorktown Mall.

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This common virus can turn deadly for babies

Dr. Gabriel Aljdeff from Advocate Children’s Hospital shared in the Daily Herald Newspaper that this year’s deadly flu season has been widely reported, but there’s another lesser-known illness that doctors are seeing a high number of cases of in young children and babies this winter.

It’s called respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

RSV is quite common, with almost all babies contracting it at least once before their second birthday. It produces mild, cold-like symptoms, including coughing, sneezing and a low-grade fever.

While RSV typically clears up on its own within a week or so, the virus can be more dangerous, even life-threatening, for others, particularly premature infants, a child born with a congenital heart defect or babies under six months old.

“The virus causes inflammation, which can block a baby’s small airway and makes it difficult for them to breathe,” explains Dr. Gabriel Aljadeff, a pediatric pulmonologist at Advocate Children’s Hospital in Park Ridge. “These higher-risk babies are very prone to RSV, becoming severe and progressing into their lower airways, leading to pneumonia and bronchiolitis.”

Every year, more than 57,000 children younger than 5 years old are hospitalized due to RSV infection, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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See Something, Say Something

Sometimes so much emphasis is given to eating right and working out that we forget that Mental Health is equally important to wellness as physical health and perhaps even more so when considering the health of a community.

I share this thought as a reaction to what appears to be an increase in acts of bullying. We live in a land where everyone is allowed to express their opinion on every topic imaginable from politics, to religion, to race, to weight. But many are forgetting that this should not be done in harsh and hurtful ways using aggressive behavior and intimidation.

These types of negative actions affect the targeted individual’s mental health and this is especially so in children. Research by stopbullying.gov indicates that persistent bullying can lead to or worsen feelings of isolation, rejection, exclusion, and despair, as well as depression and anxiety, which can contribute to suicidal behavior.

So as we approach spring, a time for rebirth and renewal, now is a good time to make a personal commitment to take a stand and stop bullying. Have the courage to use the simple “See something, Say Something” approach. When adults respond quickly and consistently to bullying behavior they send the message that it is not acceptable. Research shows this can stop bullying behavior over time.

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