Healthy Valentine’s Day

Vegan Sugar Cookies

Carolyn Casner EatingWell Recipe Developer & Tester shared that it’s hard to imagine a classic buttery sugar cookie without the butter, but trust us, it’s possible. Here, we use coconut oil instead of butter for dairy-free eggless cut-out cookies that taste delicious and are fun to make and eat. Decorate with a citrus glaze colored with a little food dye, sprinkles and/or sanding sugar as you wish.

What you need;
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ tablespoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ⅛ teaspoon salt
  • Great Value Salt, 26 oz
  • ½ cup room temperature coconut oil (not liquid)
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • ⅓ cup water
  • 4 teaspoons grated lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

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Can you overdress a child in the winter?

Lurie Children’s Hospital shared with the Daily Herald Newspaper that winter is in full swing in Chicago, and with chilling temperatures, many parents are cautious to protect their children from the cold. But is it possible to overdress a child in the winter?

Dr. Kenneth Polin, a primary care pediatrician at Lurie Children’s Primary Care — Town & Country Pediatrics, explains potential side effects of overdressing children and sets the record straight on how probable kids are to feeling the heat in the winter.

According to Polin, it is possible to overdress a child, but very unlikely.

Older children are most susceptible to overheating and wearing numerous layers since they have a larger surface area than infants. It can be difficult to distinguish whether or not infants are overheated because they are unable to talk.

What are symptoms that a child is overheated?

“It’s very hard to overdress a child, and there are minimal side effects of heat exhaustion in the winter, but if children are sweating or act irritable and uncomfortable, you need to reassess them to consider if they are overdressed,” he says.

Polin advises the best way to determine if children are warmer than usual is to feel their chest, not hands and feet.

“The hands and feet may not be indicative of central body temperature, and if children are not wearing gloves in a cold environment, they may feel cold, even if they are hot,” he explains.

During cold temperatures, it is often common for parents to bundle their infant in multiple layers, especially in the car. Read more

Help kids be more physically active with these simple tips

Dr. Matthew Smiley from Advocate Children’s Hospital shared in the Daily Herald Newspaper that we often think of not having enough time to exercise as an adult problem, but new research shows that children are affected by this issue as well.

A recent report from the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance stated that physical inactivity levels in children around the globe have reached crisis levels and showed that children worldwide are not active enough to maintain healthy growth and development.

The findings in this report might surprise some, but these trends are not new. It is well documented that a sedentary lifestyle and decreased rates of physical activity are increasingly common in the United States, and not surprisingly, around the globe.

A sedentary lifestyle can be dangerous, as it is associated with higher rates of obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and shortened life span. It’s necessary to teach children the importance of leading a healthy and active lifestyle at an early age.

Many factors contribute to an increase in sedentary lifestyles, including a lack of resources and access to opportunities to participate in physical activities and the number of time children spends with screens.

Ideally, children should engage in no more than two hours per day of recreational screen time. To help children adhere to this rule, parents need to proactively think about how they’re going to regulate screen time. Small behavior modifications like keeping screens out of the bedroom, away from the dinner table, setting time limits on tablet and video game usage, and unplugging for a day as a family can go a long way in helping kids find activities to do sans technology — exercise being one of them. Read more

Illinois becomes first ‘SUNucated’ state in 2019

Illinois has become the 18th state to allow children to possess and apply sunscreen at school, an important step in preventing skin cancer.

The legislation known as SUNucate was introduced by Rep. John Connor and carried through the Senate by Sen. Tom Cullerton. It is designed to eliminate barriers that prohibit students from possessing and using over-the-counter sunscreen in school.

Sunscreen often falls under broad reaching “medication bans” that require a physician’s note or prescription to utilize in school. Illinois is only the second state to allow students to wear sun-safe clothing, including hats, and the first to encourage sun-safe behavior in school curricula.

“I am proud of my home state of Illinois for taking this great step in bringing awareness to skin cancer and ensuring that, from a young age, students know to apply sunscreen while outdoors is key to combating this epidemic,” said American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Association President Dr. Murad Alam.

“Allowing children to use sun-protective clothing provides an additional layer of prevention, and teaching kids about how best to protect themselves from the sun will have a lifelong, positive influence.

“If we are serious about lowering the incidence of skin cancer, then SUNucate is a common-sense, budget-neutral way for states and schools to become involved.”

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Take a Stand for Food Allergy Research

This New Year, make your resolution count by becoming an advocate for research.

FARE’s mission is to improve the quality of life and the health of individuals with food allergies and to provide them hope through the promise of new treatments.  FARE formed in 2012 when two reputable organizations merged: the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN) and the Food Allergy Initiative (FAI).

From joining the FARE Patient Registry and completing our surveys to participating in clinical trials near you, your impact can improve the lives of everyone with food allergies.

Log in to your profile on foodallergypatientregistry.org to access the surveys, record recent reactions and more.

Not yet enrolled? Visit foodallergypatientregistry.org to join the world’s largest food allergy registry and share your story.

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Top 10 Ways To Get Kids Involved In Healthy Cooking & Shopping

https://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org   offers these great suggestions:

10.Mean Green Cleaning Machine. Let them wash fruits and vegetables when preparing
for cooking or eating.

9.Pick A Peck!  When shopping, let them select a new fruit or vegetable to try … or several!

8.Make It Snappy! Let them snap the green beans, snap peas, or break the flowerets from the broccoli or cauliflower.

7.I Spy. Play “I Spy” in the produce section when grocery shopping.

6.Tear It Up! Let them tear the lettuce for salads and sandwiches.

5.Measure Up! Let them measure the frozen vegetables before cooking them.
See How Much You Need

4.Peel & Slice. Older children can peel and slice carrotscucumberspotatoes… the list goes on!

3.Stir & Spice. Make applesauce from fresh apples. Let them help stir and add the cinnamon.

2.A Sprinkle A Day… Let them sprinkle herbs or other seasonings onto vegetables.

1.Monster Mash! Pull out the potato masher!

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Folic Acid Helps Prevent Some Birth Defects

Learn how to get healthy before and during pregnancy to increase your chances of having a healthy baby. Plan ahead by getting 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid each day.

Folic acid is an important part of planning for a healthy pregnancy. CDC urges all women of reproductive age to get 400 mcg of folic acid each day, in addition to consuming food with folate from a varied diet, to help prevent some major birth defects of the baby’s brain (known as anencephaly) and spine (known as spina bifida). Anencephaly is a serious birth defect in which parts of a baby’s brain and skull do not form correctly. Babies born with anencephaly cannot survive. Spina bifida is a serious birth defect in which a baby’s spine does not develop correctly and can result in some severe physical disabilities. All women, but especially those who might become pregnant, need 400 mcg of folic acid every day.

All women need 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid every day.

Do I need folic acid?

Yes! Every woman needs to get 400 mcg of folic acid each day, in addition to consuming food with folate from a varied diet, even if she does not plan on becoming pregnant. Our bodies use folic acid to make new cells like the skin, hair, and nails. Start a healthy habit today by getting 400 mcg of folic acid every day. Read more

Can you overdress a child in the winter?

Lurie Children’s Hospital shared that winter is in full swing in Chicago, and with chilling temperatures, many parents are cautious to protect their children from the cold. But is it possible to overdress a child in the winter?

Dr. Kenneth Polin, a primary care pediatrician at Lurie Children’s Primary Care — Town & Country Pediatrics, explains potential side effects of overdressing children and sets the record straight on how probable kids are to feeling the heat in the winter.

According to Polin, it is possible to overdress a child, but very unlikely.

Older children are most susceptible to overheating and wearing numerous layers since they have a larger surface area than infants. It can be difficult to distinguish whether or not infants are overheated because they are unable to talk.

What are symptoms that a child is overheated?

“It’s very hard to overdress a child, and there are minimal side effects of heat exhaustion in the winter, but if children are sweating or act irritable and uncomfortable, you need to reassess them to consider if they are overdressed,” he says.

Polin advises the best way to determine if children are warmer than usual is to feel their chest, not hands and feet.

“The hands and feet may not be indicative of central body temperature, and if children are not wearing gloves in a cold environment, they may feel cold, even if they are hot,” he explains.

During cold temperatures, it is often common for parents to bundle their infant in multiple layers, especially in the car. Read more

How Your Child’s Sleeping Habits can Prevent Childhood Obesity

Sara Westgreen is a researcher for the sleep science hub Tuck.com. She sleeps on a king size bed in Texas, where she defends her territory against cats all night. A mother of three, she enjoys beer, board games, and getting as much sleep as she can get her hands on.  Sara generously shared the following article with Healthy Lombard
The number of obese children has increased markedly since 1999, and this is a major health concern for many people. Approximately 17% of children in the US are considered obese. Nearly 1/3 of toddlers sleep less than the CDC’s recommended

While many people know that nutrition and physical activity are linked to obesity, there’s another aspect of our lives that has been linked to it: sleep. The National Health Society’s research found links between chronic sleep deprivation and diseases like obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. Studies have found that focusing on sleep hygiene and health has had the most success with preventing childhood obesity.

Here are some ways your child’s sleep might be affecting their weight.

Sleep Length

Sleeping for shorter periods of time has been linked with weight gain for more than a decade. This is because the hormones leptin and ghrelin are secreted in different quantities during naps than they are during a full night’s sleep. These hormones regulate your appetite, and when they aren’t in the right proportions, can cause you to be hungry even when your body doesn’t need any nutrients.

Children in the lowest two-quarters of sleep duration in one study were found to be more likely to be obese at age 7 than children in the highest two-quarters of the study. According to another study, shorter sleep durations are one of the primary connections between sleep and early-onset obesity.

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5 ways to ensure healthy diet plan of your new born baby

Prince Kapoor, a seasoned Marketing Analyst, and Blogger,  has been helping fellow marketers and brands worldwide. He recently submitted the following article for Healthy Lombard to share with its readers.

Motherhood is the most precious time in the lives of most women. The very idea of bringing a new life is nothing but thrilling! But of course, it is twisted with a lot of responsibilities. All new mothers falter at first. They do not know how to handle their precious darling in the first few days. It is overwhelming initially, and extremely challenging since the newborn must be fed right to become strong.

In the previous days, the grandmothers were the best source of knowledge for the new mother. Be it a food-related question, or general curiosity, the grandmothers were right on their toes to help out the new mother. But times are changing, and so is the need for nutrition of most children. Under that light, it is important to come up with a new and developed feeding plan which is based on the requirement of the toddlers and newborns of the current times.

Breastfeeding and Formula

The first few months of an infant’s life is precious. At that time, they must be fed just the right kind of food so that they can grow a strong immune system as an adult. At this stage, all the nutrient requirement of a newborn is met through the breast milk, nature’s gift to the child. Though most children are comfortable with breast milk for the first couple of months, some of them might face complications. In that case, it is advisable to switch to any infant formula after consulting a doctor, It is important to note that newborn babies do not require water, juice or any other fluids. Read more