Have You Downloaded Your Activity Tracker for 2019?

The mission of the Healthy Lombard Foundation is to address the epidemic of childhood obesity and promote a healthier lifestyle for all community members through awareness, activities, and achievement. Based on this mission, Healthy Lombard developed the Flat Apple program to incentivize kids to stay active during summer. This Program is only occurring between now and August 9th with many great prizes that will be awarded in September.

To learn more about Flat Apple and register your child or recommend it to children you may know, visit www.healthylombard.com and click on the ‘Flat Apple’ link on the right side, under Quick Clicks.

This program is free of charge but participation requires an adult register each child. The Program is easy and fun, and all kids have to do is earn tickets by participating in 300 minutes of activity (per ticket) to win a prize! Prizes are raffled at the end of the summer.

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How to know when chest pain signals a heart attack

Dr. Michael Brottman, a specialist in cardiovascular disease on the medical staff at Elmhurst Hospital and with Advocate Medical Group, shared in the Edwards-Elmhurst Healthy Driven Blog that heart disease remains the top cause of death for men and women in the United States.

For many, chest pain is the first symptom of concern. Known medically as angina, chest pain occurs when the heart muscle is temporarily blocked and deprived of receiving the blood and oxygen it needs.

Each year, millions of Americans are seen in emergency departments for chest pain.

Though unexplained chest pain does not always indicate a heart attack, it should not be ignored. Every 40 seconds, someone in the U.S. suffers a heart attack. Understanding the warning signs of heart attack, and when to react to them, can save your life.

Angina may feel like pressure or squeezing on your chest. The pain can also occur in your jawbone, shoulders, back, neck or arms. While angina is relatively common, it can be difficult to distinguish from other types of chest pain, such as the discomfort that comes with indigestion.

There are two main types of angina: stable and unstable. The latter sometimes signals a heart attack. Read more

Building Financial Health at a Young Age

Inland Bank has a new program to help kids learn the benefits of making goals and learning how to save to achieve them.

The program, called Indy Junior Savers program, teaches children the importance of building their savings by enrolling them in our Indy Junior Savers Program. It’s a fun and exciting way for them to save!

Benefits include:

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Cyberbullying – A Widespread Problem

Broadbandsearch.net has recently published a post on cyberbullying statistics that has been updated with all the latest info and data for 2019.  This is useful since widespread internet access is an exceptionally positive development for education and access to information, but it can also open the door for a lot of negative and otherwise unsavory behavior. An online presence comes with some risks one opens oneself to, and an extra level of care that needs to be applied to any information one supplies about themselves. You never know who is going to use your personal information to target and harass you.

Bullying is an issue that has always existed, not only among children, but also adults, and technology has made it possible for bullies to reach their victims in new ways. People you know or complete strangers can reach you with hurtful words, threats, and other forms of abuse via cyberbullying. This is a real problem that is only growing, with statistics showing that 34% of people report that they’ve been a victim of cyberbullying in their lifetime.

Thankfully, there are ways to curb, avoid, and minimize instances of cyberbullying and its effects. The most important step is to seek help when it happens, and not allow the bully to silence you. There are authorities that deal with this issue and you should never face this alone. Read more

Anxiety and depression in children

The CDC shared that many children have fears and worries, and may feel sad and hopeless from time to time. Strong fears may appear at different times during development. For example, toddlers are often very distressed about being away from their parents, even if they are safe and cared for. Although some fears and worries are typical in children, persistent or extreme forms of fear and sadness could be due to anxiety or depression. Learn about anxiety and depression in children.

Facts

  • Anxiety and depression affect many children1
    • 7.1% of children aged 3-17 years (approximately 4.4 million) have diagnosed anxiety.
    • 3.2% of children aged 3-17 years (approximately 1.9 million) have diagnosed depression.
  • Anxiety and depression have increased over time2
    • “Ever having been diagnosed with either anxiety or depression” among children aged 6-17 years increased from 5.4% in 2003 to 8% in 2007 and to 8.4% in 2011–2012.
    • “Ever having been diagnosed with anxiety” among children aged 6-17 years increased from 5.5% in 2007 to 6.4% in 2011–2012.
    • “Ever having been diagnosed with depression” among children aged 6-17 years did not change between 2007 (4.7%) and 2011–2012 (4.9%).

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Food Safety at Fairs and Festivals

The Center for Disease Control shared that a fun family activity is attending fairs, festivals, carnivals, and rodeos. Follow these tips to have safe cooking, eating, and drinking experience at those events.

Fairs and festivals are exciting events and there are always fun things to see and experience, including artwork, music, games, and rides. One of the biggest draws for these events is the many different types of foods and drinks available.

Sometimes the usual safety controls in a kitchen, like handwashing facilities, refrigeration, thermometers to check food temperatures, and workers trained in food safety, may not be available when cooking and dining at fairs and festivals. This makes it even more important for you to follow food safety tips.

Remember that food safety practices are the same at fairs as they are at restaurants and at home: Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill. Learn more about these steps, and reduce your chances of getting food poisoning. Read more

1Climb, adidas Build Walls for Boys & Girls Clubs

Nate Mitka shared with Children and Nature network that with his ascent of the Dawn Wall in 2015, Kevin Jorgeson made climbing history. And it seems the Californian climber continues to push the climbing envelope beyond Yosemite Valley.  1Climb, a nonprofit Jorgeson co-founded to introduce kids to climbing, recently announced an initiative to build 10 climbing walls in Boys & Girls Clubs across the U.S.

The partnership hopes to introduce 100,000 kids in urban areas to their first climb. According to the plan, 1Climb intends to build climbing walls in L.A., Chicago, and New York City to help thousands of urban youths access climbing by the end of 2019. And, it intends to open the six more in 2020.

“Our belief is that through sport, we have the power to change lives and this partnership is a perfect example that brings those words to life,” said Stephen Dowling, VP of marketing at Adidas Outdoor. “We are incredibly excited to partner with 1Climb in order to bring the benefits of the outdoors to the city, building climbing walls to break down social barriers, and create an equal starting line for tens and thousands of girls and boys across America.” Read more

Does it need stitches?

Kimberly McKinnon, D.O.Specialty: Family medicine, shared in the Edwards Elmhurst Healthy Driven Blog that cuts and scrapes are part of life. If you have kids, they’re part of everyday life.

Most of the time we don’t hurt ourselves that badly. A scrape or a minor cut usually requires a little home treatment and heals on its own.

Sometimes, however, we end up with a doozy. Not all injuries need stitches to heal, but some do. And it’s not always easy to decide whether you need a doctor.

First, when you get a cut or puncture wound:

  • Gently wash it with soap and water
  • Put pressure on the injury and elevate it if possible to stop the bleeding
  • Once the bleeding stops, examine the wound. If the edges stay together during your normal body movement, and it’s not very deep, you probably don’t need further medical treatment
  • Apply an antibiotic ointment (e.g., Neosporin®) and cover the cut with gauze or a bandage

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Why Parents Should Vaccinate Their Chlldren

Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institutes of Health shared that vaccines are essential for protecting children against infectious diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, and whooping cough.  Many of these diseases are largely forgotten in our country.  Before vaccines became available, however, these diseases exacted a huge toll.  For example, before the measles vaccine was licensed in 1963, the virus infected at least 2 million Americans a year, causing 500 deaths and 48,000 hospitalizations.

It may be upsetting for parents to see their babies or young children receive several vaccinations during a medical visit. However, these shots are necessary for protection from multiple dangerous—and sometimes deadly—diseases. Vaccinations typically cause only mild side effects, such as redness or swelling at the injection site; serious side effects are very rare. The public health benefits of vaccination far outweigh the possible side effects.

When children are vaccinated, their immune systems develop infection-fighting antibodies to protect them from contracting the targeted disease if they are exposed to it later in life. The full course of recommended childhood vaccinations, largely completed for most children by age 6, not only protects the vaccinated child but also contributes to a larger umbrella of protection known as “herd immunity.” By doing so, it helps prevent the spread of disease to those who cannot be vaccinated, including newborns who are too young to be vaccinated, and people with compromised immune systems, who cannot effectively develop antibodies to fend off disease.

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Ginger for Migraines