45% of teens are online ‘almost constantly.’ But is it good for them?

Abby OhlheiserThe Washington Post shared that forty-five percent of teens say they are online “almost constantly,” according to a new Pew Research Center study on teens and social media use. That percentage has nearly doubled in just a few years: In a 2014-2015 Pew survey, just 24 percent of teens said the same.

Pew’s survey, released on Thursday, asked American teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17 about their social media use.

“One of the questions we wanted to examine was how teens evaluate the impact of social media on their lives,” said Monica Anderson, a Pew research associate and the lead author of the study. After conducting the survey, Anderson said, Pew found that “there’s not really a strong consensus” on what that impact is.

In all, 89 percent of teens surveyed in 2018 said they were either online “almost constantly” or “several times a day,” with just 11 percent telling Pew they were online once a day or less.

That rise in the “almost constantly” category is likely linked to “a pretty big jump” in teens who have access to smartphones, Anderson said. Ninety-five percent of teens have access to a smartphone in 2018. Three years ago, Pew reported that 73 percent of teens said the same. Read more

There’s no place like home

College of DuPage Nursing Student Erin O’Loughlin researched that the DuPage County Department of Economic Development and Planning reported in 2011 that 11.4% of DuPage County’s population are senior citizens. A senior citizen is anyone at or over the age of 65. Seniors can experience overall wellness through diet, exercise, healthy lifestyle, and other health promoting activities. However, some seniors begin to need more help with everyday life and health in order to remain living in their home safely. DuPage County is fortunate enough to a vast amount of resources and professionals to help seniors remain safe at home.

DuPage County Community Services has a Senior Services department to assist seniors to remain at home by using supportive resources. These support resources can include transportation vouchers, home care workers, adult day care, life alert buttons, food pantries, support groups, senior centers, senior activity groups, Meals on Wheels, and more. Low income residents can be assessed and educated about different state and county services. The county can also provide information about private services. According to Nursing Economics, these kinds of resources have been shown to help seniors improve thinking and reasoning, improve senior depression, reduce episodes of incontinence, decrease pain, and increase activities of daily living. Seniors may even qualify for routine home visits. Read more

How Music Helps with Mental Health – Mind Boosting Benefits of Music Therapy

Music has been with us for thousands of years as a form of entertainment, communication, celebration, and mourning. There are so many different emotions that music can help us to express, and it is a language that we share universally, as well as one that everyone can understand.

The style of music that we listen to most and enjoy may change every decade, but that sense of communication and feeling always remains. If you, or someone close to you, suffer from mental health conditions, you may find that they listen to music quite a lot, or even play it.

Music has a way of helping us express emotions that we don’t even understand ourselves, and can put these feelings into meaningful lyrics, or just a tune that resonates with every fiber of our being.

For many, music is a lifeline that keeps them tethered to the world, and without it, so many of us would be lost entirely. It is because of this link that music therapy was developed, and it is a great way to learn how to channel your feelings and combat mental illness. As someone who suffers from crippling anxiety and waves of depression, I have always been interested in trying this form of therapy out.

Whether you like to play the music or listen to it, you might be surprised to discover how beneficial this form of treatment can be, and in this extensive article, we look at the different ways in which music therapy can boost mental health. Read more

Support for Women With a Disability

The Office on Women’s Health and the President’s Council on Sports, Fitness and Nutrition (PCSFN) have partnered to ensure that women and girls with a disability have opportunities to be physically active and practice healthy eating behaviors through the I Can Do It! (ICDI) model. The ICDI model is used to assist schools and communities aiming to establish inclusive health promotion programs.

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Is texting good for your mental health?

Hannah Natanson shared in The Washington Post that texting gets a bad rap. It’s blamed for everything from fostering social isolation to increasing teens’ risk of ADHD to driving down adolescent self-esteem to damaging the spine — a phenomenon known as “text neck.”

But some technological and medical experts say the negativity is unfair and overblown. Texting can and should be a positive force in people’s lives, both in terms of emotional and physical health, they say — so long as it’s used correctly.

“I have a reputation as sort of being the Darth Vader of anything that has to do with texting,” said MIT psychologist Sherry Turkle, author of “Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age.” “Which, of course, is not really what I have said or am saying — the problem really isn’t that people have this new, interesting, intimate way of touching base … the trouble is what happens to a face-to-face conversation if your phone is always there.”

If done well, Turkle and other experts said, texting can improve interpersonal relationships, help people deal with traumatic events and bridge intergenerational gaps.

Research backs this up: A 2012 study conducted by psychologists at the University of California at Berkeley found that sending and receiving text messages boosted texters’ moods when they were feeling upset or lonely. Read more

Screen Time Use Linked to ADH

The study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, tracked 2,500 teens over two years and monitored their usage and symptoms.

It doesn’t prove a causal link. The study also didn’t rule out other possible causes such as lack of sleep, family stress at home or a family history of the disorder. But it was the first longitudinal study to follow so many teens over a two-year period, according to experts, going straight to an issue that pits parents and teachers against the tech industry in a battle for children’s attention.

“I don’t think it’s reason for panic. But I’m a clinician who sees kids with ADHD all the time, and I don’t want to see an increase,” says Jenny Radesky, a University of Michigan assistant professor of pediatrics, who specializes in developmental and behavioral health.

“Executive function and flexible problem solving—all that matters for long-term success,” she said. “Even if it’s a small increase in ADHD, I think that’s important.” Such skills are often affected by ADHD. Dr. Radesky, who wrote a JAMA editorial about the new study, wasn’t involved in the work.

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Self-Care: The Journey to Maintain a Healthy Lifestyle

Paired with our expertise, the team at Jumo Health shared that encouraging a healthy lifestyle is essential for the growth and development of our youth. When we teach our kids self-care practices, they are likely to maintain these practices in order to evolve and thrive from adolescents into healthy adults. Self-care does not just pertain to physical health but it includes mental health as well. While childhood obesity and mental illness are not always mutually exclusive, they are commonly diagnosed as a result of the other.

Nearly 1 in 5 school age children and young people (aged 6 to 19 years) in the United States has obesity. Children who suffer from obesity are teased more than their peers of healthy weight, and therefore are more likely to suffer from social isolation, depression and lower self-esteem. However, there are ways in which we can encourage our children to take care of their body and their mind. Here are three self-care practices to start incorporating into our everyday lives:

 

Power a Healthy Mindset with Knowledge

According to Sarah Katula, an Advanced Psychiatric Nurse, conversations about the mental health of another person should begin with a casual chat. This facilitates the opportunity for a loved one or friend to point out a noticed behavior without accusation. In the particular scenario of childhood obesity, this is a conversation that will likely be started by a parent who notices a change in their child. Coping with any diagnosis can be challenging, and growing up diagnosed with obesity has its own particular set of challenges. Read more

The Habits of Highly Successful People

     Milan Krstovic, Jr. Media Relations Associate, at  Porch and her team shared that perhaps we should forget “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.” These days, gurus across the internet claim dozens of routines will put you on the path to fulfillment. In one camp, there are the evangelists of wholesome habits: Get up early, make your bed, and exercise, and you’ll inevitably encounter success. Then you have the mindfulness contingent, who says daily meditation will deliver clarity to even the most frazzled capitalists. Other habit-based programs take consistency to the extreme, suggesting eating and wearing the same things each day. If you’re skeptical of these well-intentioned suggestions, don’t kick yourself for your cynicism. It’s hard to know if any of these habits truly work for you––or anyone.

That’s why Data for Stories  experimented on its own, surveying over 1,000 people on how successful they feel in several major life areas. They then asked them about their habits to gain a statistical view of the practices that correlate most closely with fulfillment. If you’ve wondered which habits allow other people to achieve their purpose and prosperity, you won’t want to miss the results. Read on to see how successful people consistently spend the one resource they can’t replenish: their time. Read more

Summer Reading Programs 2018

Below you’ll find a list of summer reading programs that will get your kids free stuff like free books, money, gift cards, movies, and more.

Having a tough time getting your child interested in reading this summer? Try downloading a free kids book on your Kindle to get them on board.

Between these summer reading programs, free summer moviesfree summer bowlingfree summer skating, and all the other summer freebiesyour kids will be very busy this summer! Read more

The Best Diet for Depression

Depression presents a baffling evolutionary puzzle. Despite its negative effects, it remains common and heritable, meaning a large part of the risk is passed through our genes. Presumably, there must be some kind of adaptive benefit or it would have been naturally selected against. Could depression be an evolutionary strategy to provide a defense against infection? Infection has been the leading cause of mortality throughout human history, making it a critical force in natural selection. Indeed, because of infections, our average life expectancy before the industrial period was only 25 years, and it was not uncommon for half of our children to die without reaching adulthood.

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