Winter Blues

Happy child in snow, white winter

College of DuPage Nursing Student AndreaOjeda shared with Healthy Lombard that there are many things to enjoy during the fall and winter seasons. For example; you can enjoy watching the trees change color, have a fun hayride with the family, watch the first snowfall, and enjoy the holidays by spending time with family and friends.

But if this is true, why do I feel so out of it?…why don’t I feel more motivated to enjoy this time of the year?

Unfortunately, for many individuals, during the fall and winter seasons, a phenomenon is known as Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD often occurs. You may be thinking; ‘funny right’? But as the leaves change color and the snow falls, so does our mood and ability to stay motivated oftentimes, making even simple activities, difficult. This may be enough to seriously impact our daily lives.

According to the Mayo Clinic, SAD is when depression occurs during seasonal changes and has a beginning and an end-time period. For the most part, it is seen during the fall and winter months but some people may experience it in summer. Unlike depression, which is one year long, SAD only occurs during these specific time frames and is then is finished. This is what distinguishes it from actual depression but it is important to recognize that someone who has this because if not taken care of, it can lead to depression. Read more

Ways To Be an Awesome Parent: Good Parenting Skills and Tips

Find My Kids Blog shared with Healthy Lombard that as your child develops from a baby and toddler to a schooler and teenager, many things change but basic principles remain the same. As an awesome parent, you will balance his or her maturity level and needs with rules, responsibilities, and allowances.

While the younger child is more self-centered and less understanding of other’s expectations, the teenager is more attuned to compromise, negotiation, and developing their independence and identity.

Knowing how to be a good parent is intuitive. Trust and follow your instinct. Gage and act according to your child’s display of maturity.

Create structure.

Communicate often and openly. Listen attentively. Encourage your kids to talk about their experiences and emotions.

Demonstrate empathy and trust.

Most of all, enjoy your children at whatever age they are. It is a time of learning and sharing, reaching new heights together. Be there while they grow.

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What To Do If You Think Your Child Has A Learning Disability

Rise and Shine shared that there are many potential reasons for problems at school, but one of the primary reasons is learning disabilities, both those already diagnosed as well as undiagnosed ones. Here’s what to do if you think your child has a learning disability.

What is a learning disability?

Almost 1 in 10 children have a learning disability, making it a very common occurrence. A learning disability is defined as lower academic performance than would be expected based on intellectual ability and opportunities to learn. There is a wide variation in how people process, retain and use the information and for some, these differences can cause difficulty in school.

While individual differences are to be celebrated and some of the most successful individuals in our history have had learning disabilities (including Michael Phelps, Thomas Edison, President John F. Kennedy, and entrepreneur and billionaire Richard Branson), learning disabilities, particularly those undiagnosed and untreated, can lead to serious school problems, low self-esteem and high drop-out rates.

Kids with undiagnosed learning disabilities often start thinking of themselves as “stupid” or “lazy” and stop trying at school in order to avoid continued failure. Finding out there is a label for what they are experiencing and getting the help they need can be life-changing for these youngsters. Early identification and intervention are very important for school success and mental health.

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October is Bullying Prevention Month

The statistics for bullying are still shockingly high, despite a decrease in recent years. According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), a study indicated that in 2017, 20% of students aged 12-18 reported being bullied. The same study also found that 15% of students in high school reported being bullied electronically. This form of bullying, sometimes called cyberbullying, is a relatively new form of bullying that often happens outside of school hours or online where teachers don’t have access to view it, thus making it harder to witness or detect.

Teresa Draeger, Content Marketing Director at EducationDegree.com and her team created a brand new guidebook, How to Prevent Bullying in the Classroom. Bullying is a major issue in today’s society, and they are committed to taking measures and providing helpful information so that, one day, our students can feel safe going to school and empowered to stand up to bullies.

How to Prevent Bullying in the Classroom includes the most comprehensive and up-to-date information out there. You can find this guide here: https://educationdegree.com/articles/how-to-stop-bullying-in-the-classroom/
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The Latest Parental Controls From Apple, Google and Amazon

Julie Jargon, the Family & Tech columnist at The Wall Street Journal, wrote that many parents ask how they can keep tabs on their children online without shelling out a lot of money—and without major headaches, especially when juggling multiple devices for multiple children. The first step isn’t to buy expensive software, but to look at the devices themselves.

The settings sections of common household Apple and Amazon devices, along with those that run Google’s Android and Chromebook software, allow parents to do everything from block explicit content to set a fixed gadget bedtime—all without paying extra or ceding privacy to an outside service.

This week, with the expected rollout of Apple’s iOS 13, parents will more easily be able to set time limits on individual iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch apps. Later this fall, Apple will launch its most compelling upgrade: the ability to manage children’s contacts and control who they can communicate with.

Many parents ask how they can keep tabs on their children online without shelling out a lot of money—and without major headaches, especially when juggling multiple devices for multiple children. The first step isn’t to buy expensive software, but to look at the devices themselves.

The settings sections of common household Apple and Amazon devices, along with those that run Google’s Android and Chromebook software, allow parents to do everything from block explicit content to set a fixed gadget bedtime—all without paying extra or ceding privacy to an outside service.

This week, with the expected rollout of Apple’s iOS 13, parents will more easily be able to set time limits on individual iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch apps. Later this fall, Apple will launch its most compelling upgrade: the ability to manage children’s contacts and control who they can communicate with.

Read more

How can high-performing students set healthy goals?

ROGERS Behavioral  Health shared that we live in a competitive world. The drive for success is affecting children at an increasingly early age with young people feeling the pressure to achieve better grades, excel on standardized college admission tests, and outperform their peers, whether it be in academics or athletics. All that can add up to stress and anxiety, even for high-performing students.

“It’s all about balance,” says Amanda Heins, Ps yD, a supervising psychologist in Rogers’ OCD and Anxiety Center for adolescent residential care. “We want high achievers in the world. They cure diseases, come up with amazing new technology, and perform complex procedures and surgeries. It’s also important when pushing yourself to succeed that you ask some questions like what do I want to accomplish? What are my personal values? Why do I want this particular goal? What’s driving me? When it comes to setting goals, oftentimes there’s a missing ingredient that unintentionally sets us up for failure.”

What are SMART goals?

Dr. Heins says goals should be SMART:

S – specific (Clearly define what it is you want to achieve.)

M – measurable (Establish a way to determine if you’ve met your goal with a tangible metric.)

A – appealing (Pursue a goal that interests you.)

R – realistic (Make sure your goal is achievable.)

T – time-bound (Ensure you have enough time to achieve your goal.) Read more

Take action to prevent suicide

Kelly Bryant, RN-BC, NEA-BC, CNESpecialty: Nursing Administration & Education with Edwards-Elmhurst Health wrote in their Healthy Driven boog that 

Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lists suicide as the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, it continues to be something many people are hesitant to discuss. For young adults 15 to 34 years of age, suicide is the third leading cause of death in Illinois. It is a serious but preventable public health concern that has lasting effects on individuals, families, and communities.

Consider Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade. People were shocked when it was announced these well-known celebrities died by suicide. To many of us, it seemed like they had it all and were thriving in life. But inside they were struggling. Both are examples of how suicide is a multifaceted problem. When it comes to suicide, no one is immune.

The stigma surrounding suicide may impact prevention and intervention efforts. Learning how to strengthen an individual’s protective factors that promote resiliency and use of coping skills, while simultaneously recognizing risk factors and imminent warning signs, is key. These factors all play a role: Read more

8 Ways To Reduce Stress In The Workplace

Cheryl from Crams, a website about stress, shared with Healthy Lombard that stress causes a lot of problems if left unchecked and can have a severely detrimental impact on employee wellbeing, motivation, and overall productivity. For that reason, reducing stress in the workplace is essential when it comes to remaining happy and efficient at work.

Knowing exactly how to mitigate work-related pressure, though, is easier said than done. That’s why in this article we’ll be running through eight methods you can use to reduce your stress levels as an employee, enabling you to continue to love your job without harming your mental health.

THE IMPACT OF STRESS IN THE WORKPLACE

Without a doubt, stress can be one of the most daunting and destructive obstacles to employee engagement in the modern-day workplace. According to a 2017/18 Labour Force Survey (LFS), a total of 15.4 million working days have been lost due to work-related stress, depression or anxiety.

Considering that employees usually get paid for sick days, the financial loss as a result of stress-related issues is enormous. Moreover, it appears that such issues are on the rise, too, with approximately 1,700 people per 100,000 workers reported to be suffering from stress, depression or anxiety in 2017/18, compared to an estimated 1,400 in 2005/06. Read more

Helping Kids Overcome School Anxiety

Laura Koehler, Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist at Edward-Elmhurst Health shared that according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 7 percent of kids ages 3-17 are diagnosed with anxiety. When left untreated, these kids are at risk to perform poorly at school and, in some cases, it will lead to school refusal behavior.

School refusal is emotionally based and tends to occur with underlying mental health issues. It’s often to avoid some type of anxiety – general, social, performance or separation. The most common ages for school refusal are ages 5-7 and 11-14. This is attributed to the transition from kindergarten to 1st grade, and going to and leaving middle school.

Here are some of the most common signs of school refusal:

  • Chronic headaches or stomachaches
  • Frequently asking to stay home from school
  • Repeatedly leaving class or going to the nurse’s office
  • Refusing to participate in extracurricular sports or activities
  • Lack of concentration or focus
  • Sleep difficulties
  • Lack of appetite or overeating

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