When Children Lose Control

Even well-meaning parents can inadvertently get in the way of a child learning these skills. When a parent avoids situations that are emotionally challenging, routinely gives in to tantrums or rushes in to fix things, the child loses the opportunity to practice and bolster their own coping abilities. “Kids need scaffolding and a support system in their parents, but they also need opportunities to learn how to tolerate and manage discomfort, which will help them in the long run,” said Susan Calkins, a professor of human development and family studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, who has been studying emotional regulation in children for nearly 30 years.

For children, lessons in regulating emotion can be found in big challenges, like going away to camp, or in smaller ones, like sitting through a dinner out without the crutch of an electronic device. Fortunately, there are proven strategies that can help children to manage emotions, even in the heat of the moment.

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Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather!

The Center for Disease Contro; shared the following information about heat-related illness and how to stay cool and safe in hot weather.

Now is the time to prepare for the high temperatures that kill hundreds of people every year. Extreme heat causes more than 600 deaths each year. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet many people still die from extreme heat every year.

Take measures to stay cool, remain hydrated, and keep informed. Getting too hot can make you sick. You can become ill from the heat if your body can’t compensate for it and properly cool you off. The main things affecting your body’s ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather are:

High humidity. When the humidity is high, sweat won’t evaporate as quickly, which keeps your body from releasing heat as fast as it may need to.
Personal factors. Age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn, and prescription drug and alcohol use can play a role in whether a person can cool off enough in very hot weather. Read more

Is my newborn normal?

Therese Gracey, M.D.Specialty: Pediatrics with Edwards-Elmhurst Health shared in their Healthy Driven blog that 

Moms know what a big change it is to have a newborn at home. You’ve waited for months for your baby to get here. Now she’s here and you aren’t quite sure what to make of this tiny creature.

During the first couple of weeks after you give birth, you may wonder: is this how a newborn is supposed to look and behave?

Here are some common newborn traits you should know, and some not-so-normal things to look out for:

  • Crying. All newborn babies cry, all the time. You’ll get familiar with your baby’s normal pattern of crying. Until then, make sure your newborn is fed, burped, has a clean diaper, and isn’t too cold or hot. You can also try holding, rocking, swaddling or singing to her.Contact your pediatrician: If your baby won’t stop crying after trying the above.
  • Breathing. Newborns tend to breathe through their noses, and their nasal passages are narrow. Your baby may breathe noisily, sneeze, or sound congested even when she doesn’t have a cold. A bulb syringe can help with clearing out her nasal passages.Contact your pediatrician right away: If your baby has trouble breathing. When in doubt, go to the ER or call 911.

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Dental Expo at Metropolitan Family Services

You’re invited to the Dental Expo at Metropolitan Family Services (222 E. Willow Ave in Wheaton) on July 18th from 9 to 2 pm.

Please note that this event is intended for children ages 0-3 as it is focused on preventative dental care and easing the fear and expectations for children and parents that often comes with the first dental visit.

The Oral Healthcare Professionals, specifically Dr. Eric Jackson, will be providing dental screenings and individualized dental education for families. Thank you, Dr. Jackson! We will also have special giveaway items for every family in attendance which include an event tote bag, dental board book, cup, age-appropriate toothbrush and more!!

If you have any questions, please  contact:

Elise Schram, MPH, CHES. Project Director, Wheaton/Warrenville Early Childhood Collaborative, Metropolitan Family Services DuPage, 222 East Willow Avenue | Wheaton, Illinois 60187 Read more

Registration for Flat Apple 2018 Begins June 1

The free Flat Apple Summer Activity encourages children to be physically active and rewards them with a prize drawing.

The Healthy Lombard Foundation wants kids to stay fit this summer, and kids who keep track of their activities just may win a prize or find a bit of local fame.

The foundation is launching the Flat Apple Summer Activity, which aims to keep kids moving through the warm weather. From Friday, June 1, through Aug. 25, kids are encouraged to take part in Healthy Lombard-sponsored activities at community events such as a Lombard Cruise Night and keep a log of the time they spend doing things that will keep their bodies healthy.

Play sports? The game goes on the log. Spend the afternoon swimming? Log it. Ride your bike with friends and take a family walk? Log and log again.

“Flat Apple is for both (the) athletic and nonathletic child,” foundation board President Jay Wojcik said. “Our goal is for kids to have a great experience and be motivated to stay active during the summer.”

To take part in Flat Apple, children between the ages of 4 and 16 must have their parents register them for the free program on the Healthy Lombard website, healthylombard.com. The program is open to children who live outside of Lombard as well as to residents.

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This common virus can turn deadly for babies

Dr. Gabriel Aljdeff from Advocate Children’s Hospital shared in the Daily Herald Newspaper that this year’s deadly flu season has been widely reported, but there’s another lesser-known illness that doctors are seeing a high number of cases of in young children and babies this winter.

It’s called respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

RSV is quite common, with almost all babies contracting it at least once before their second birthday. It produces mild, cold-like symptoms, including coughing, sneezing and a low-grade fever.

While RSV typically clears up on its own within a week or so, the virus can be more dangerous, even life-threatening, for others, particularly premature infants, a child born with a congenital heart defect or babies under six months old.

“The virus causes inflammation, which can block a baby’s small airway and makes it difficult for them to breathe,” explains Dr. Gabriel Aljadeff, a pediatric pulmonologist at Advocate Children’s Hospital in Park Ridge. “These higher-risk babies are very prone to RSV, becoming severe and progressing into their lower airways, leading to pneumonia and bronchiolitis.”

Every year, more than 57,000 children younger than 5 years old are hospitalized due to RSV infection, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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The Top 8 Worst Candies to Place in Your Child’s Easter Basket

College of DuPage Nursing Student McKenna Musich, shared that it’s almost that time of year again! Hopping bunnies, pastel eggs, fake grass, and sweet candies. Easter is just around the corner and most parents are planning just what to stash in those colorful baskets. According to Statistic Brain Research Group, in 2016 the United States spent 2.1 billion dollars on Easter candy. But which candy is the worst candy to place in the basket? Let’s take a look at the top 8 worst candies for Easter.

  1. Reese’s Peanut Butter Eggs – One serving is one piece. Each piece is 170 calories. There is 90 calories from fat and 16 grams of sugar.
  1. Cadbury Crème Eggs – Serving size is one egg. Calories per serving is 170, with 54 of those calories from fat. These eggs contain 25 grams of sugar.
  1. Almond Joy Egg – Serving size 1 egg. 277 calories, 12 g of fat. 1 gram of sugar. While 1 gram of sugar may not seem like much, note that there is 735 mg of sodium in one egg (about 30% of the daily value).
  1. M&Ms (Easter eggs) – Serving size is ¼ of a cup. Calories total to 203 (about 10% of the daily value), with 4 g of fat. Sugar rests at 1 gram.
  1. Peeps  – One serving (5 Peeps) contains 140 calories. None of these calories come from fat, but Peeps contain 34 grams of sugar.
  1. Jelly Beans – Serving size is 31 pieces. Calories per serving is 140, 0 from fat. There is 29 grams of sugar per serving.

  7.  Swedish Fish – These little fish come in limited edition “egg” form for Easter. The serving size is 9 pieces. There is 140 calories , 0 of those from fat. These have 29 grams of sugar per serving.

  1. Hersey’s Easter Eggs – Serving size is 8 pieces. 550 calories (nearly 30% of the daily value). 0 grams of fat or sugar.

So this Easter, take a second look at those nutrition facts and make the right call. A healthy Easter is a happy Easter!

References

All nutritional facts were found using MyFitnessPal.

“Easter Statistics-Statistic Brain.”2017 Statistic Brain Research Institute, publishing as Statistic Brain. 23rd March, 2017. Http://www.statisticbrain.com/Easter-statistics

ProActive Kids Foundation Announces Exclusive Nutrition Education Provider

In celebration of National Nutrition Month, the ProActive Kids Foundation announced on March 7, that it has formed an exclusive partnership with NCES Health and Nutrition Education (NCES) from Olathe, KS, a nutrition resource company that specializes in creating and distributing nutrition education materials to dietitians and healthcare professionals, schools, and government agencies both nationally and internationally.
ProActive Kids Foundation selected NCES Nutrition as their exclusive curriculum partner in nutrition education for their comprehensive nutrition education resources, industry expertise and shared mission of fighting the childhood obesity crisis via education. They join Meier Clinics’ mental health coaching and Right Fit Sport Fitness Wellness’ physical activity curriculum to complete this evidence-based, proven intervention curriculum. Collectively, ProActive Kids and its partners continue to deliver, review and refine its curriculum to ensure its meeting the research, trends and desired industry outcomes.

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McDonald’s moves cheeseburgers off Happy Meal menu

Associated Press Retail Reporter Joseph Pisani and video journalist Carrie Antlfinger shared with the Daily Herald newspaper that McDonald’s is taking cheeseburgers and chocolate milk off its Happy Meal menu in an effort to cut down on the calories, sodium, saturated fat and sugar that kids consume at its restaurants.

Diners can still ask specifically for cheeseburgers or chocolate milk with the kid’s meal, but the fast-food company said that not listing them will reduce how often they’re ordered. Since it removed soda from the Happy Meal menu four years ago, orders for it with Happy Meals have fallen 14 percent, the company said. Hamburgers and Chicken McNuggets will remain the main entrees on the Happy Meal menu. Read more