Registration for Flat Apple 2018 Begins June 1

The free Flat Apple Summer Activity encourages children to be physically active and rewards them with a prize drawing.

The Healthy Lombard Foundation wants kids to stay fit this summer, and kids who keep track of their activities just may win a prize or find a bit of local fame.

The foundation is launching the Flat Apple Summer Activity, which aims to keep kids moving through the warm weather. From Friday, June 1, through Aug. 25, kids are encouraged to take part in Healthy Lombard-sponsored activities at community events such as a Lombard Cruise Night and keep a log of the time they spend doing things that will keep their bodies healthy.

Play sports? The game goes on the log. Spend the afternoon swimming? Log it. Ride your bike with friends and take a family walk? Log and log again.

“Flat Apple is for both (the) athletic and nonathletic child,” foundation board President Jay Wojcik said. “Our goal is for kids to have a great experience and be motivated to stay active during the summer.”

To take part in Flat Apple, children between the ages of 4 and 16 must have their parents register them for the free program on the Healthy Lombard website, healthylombard.com. The program is open to children who live outside of Lombard as well as to residents.

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This common virus can turn deadly for babies

Dr. Gabriel Aljdeff from Advocate Children’s Hospital shared in the Daily Herald Newspaper that this year’s deadly flu season has been widely reported, but there’s another lesser-known illness that doctors are seeing a high number of cases of in young children and babies this winter.

It’s called respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

RSV is quite common, with almost all babies contracting it at least once before their second birthday. It produces mild, cold-like symptoms, including coughing, sneezing and a low-grade fever.

While RSV typically clears up on its own within a week or so, the virus can be more dangerous, even life-threatening, for others, particularly premature infants, a child born with a congenital heart defect or babies under six months old.

“The virus causes inflammation, which can block a baby’s small airway and makes it difficult for them to breathe,” explains Dr. Gabriel Aljadeff, a pediatric pulmonologist at Advocate Children’s Hospital in Park Ridge. “These higher-risk babies are very prone to RSV, becoming severe and progressing into their lower airways, leading to pneumonia and bronchiolitis.”

Every year, more than 57,000 children younger than 5 years old are hospitalized due to RSV infection, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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The Top 8 Worst Candies to Place in Your Child’s Easter Basket

College of DuPage Nursing Student McKenna Musich, shared that it’s almost that time of year again! Hopping bunnies, pastel eggs, fake grass, and sweet candies. Easter is just around the corner and most parents are planning just what to stash in those colorful baskets. According to Statistic Brain Research Group, in 2016 the United States spent 2.1 billion dollars on Easter candy. But which candy is the worst candy to place in the basket? Let’s take a look at the top 8 worst candies for Easter.

  1. Reese’s Peanut Butter Eggs – One serving is one piece. Each piece is 170 calories. There is 90 calories from fat and 16 grams of sugar.
  1. Cadbury Crème Eggs – Serving size is one egg. Calories per serving is 170, with 54 of those calories from fat. These eggs contain 25 grams of sugar.
  1. Almond Joy Egg – Serving size 1 egg. 277 calories, 12 g of fat. 1 gram of sugar. While 1 gram of sugar may not seem like much, note that there is 735 mg of sodium in one egg (about 30% of the daily value).
  1. M&Ms (Easter eggs) – Serving size is ¼ of a cup. Calories total to 203 (about 10% of the daily value), with 4 g of fat. Sugar rests at 1 gram.
  1. Peeps  – One serving (5 Peeps) contains 140 calories. None of these calories come from fat, but Peeps contain 34 grams of sugar.
  1. Jelly Beans – Serving size is 31 pieces. Calories per serving is 140, 0 from fat. There is 29 grams of sugar per serving.

  7.  Swedish Fish – These little fish come in limited edition “egg” form for Easter. The serving size is 9 pieces. There is 140 calories , 0 of those from fat. These have 29 grams of sugar per serving.

  1. Hersey’s Easter Eggs – Serving size is 8 pieces. 550 calories (nearly 30% of the daily value). 0 grams of fat or sugar.

So this Easter, take a second look at those nutrition facts and make the right call. A healthy Easter is a happy Easter!

References

All nutritional facts were found using MyFitnessPal.

“Easter Statistics-Statistic Brain.”2017 Statistic Brain Research Institute, publishing as Statistic Brain. 23rd March, 2017. Http://www.statisticbrain.com/Easter-statistics

ProActive Kids Foundation Announces Exclusive Nutrition Education Provider

In celebration of National Nutrition Month, the ProActive Kids Foundation announced on March 7, that it has formed an exclusive partnership with NCES Health and Nutrition Education (NCES) from Olathe, KS, a nutrition resource company that specializes in creating and distributing nutrition education materials to dietitians and healthcare professionals, schools, and government agencies both nationally and internationally.
ProActive Kids Foundation selected NCES Nutrition as their exclusive curriculum partner in nutrition education for their comprehensive nutrition education resources, industry expertise and shared mission of fighting the childhood obesity crisis via education. They join Meier Clinics’ mental health coaching and Right Fit Sport Fitness Wellness’ physical activity curriculum to complete this evidence-based, proven intervention curriculum. Collectively, ProActive Kids and its partners continue to deliver, review and refine its curriculum to ensure its meeting the research, trends and desired industry outcomes.

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McDonald’s moves cheeseburgers off Happy Meal menu

Associated Press Retail Reporter Joseph Pisani and video journalist Carrie Antlfinger shared with the Daily Herald newspaper that McDonald’s is taking cheeseburgers and chocolate milk off its Happy Meal menu in an effort to cut down on the calories, sodium, saturated fat and sugar that kids consume at its restaurants.

Diners can still ask specifically for cheeseburgers or chocolate milk with the kid’s meal, but the fast-food company said that not listing them will reduce how often they’re ordered. Since it removed soda from the Happy Meal menu four years ago, orders for it with Happy Meals have fallen 14 percent, the company said. Hamburgers and Chicken McNuggets will remain the main entrees on the Happy Meal menu. Read more

10 ways to keep your family heart healthy

Helping your young kids adopt a healthy lifestyle may not seem as urgent as telling them to wear bike helmets or to stay near the lifeguard at the beach, but it can be life-saving. By laying this groundwork you’re arming them for a lifetime of reduced risk of heart disease, the leading cause of death in adults.

As a personal trainer, Mary Bielawski is well versed in what’s needed for a healthy lifestyle — especially the right exercise and good nutrition. She shares this information with her clients at Edward-Elmhurst Health & Fitness and uses it to create a way of life for her children, 6-year-old Ethan and 3-year-old Evelyn.

Bielawski suggests these strategies for helping your family stay heart healthy:

No couch potatoes: 5 tips for keeping your family on the move

  1. Children 6 and older need at least an hour a day of physical activity, according to Health & Human Services guidelines. School kids often need some down time, too. Let them recharge for their active time by playing with toys, reading a book or just relaxing. Limit time spent online, watching TV or playing video games.
  2. If your young child regularly pushes back about playing outside, give them choices. For example, offer to take them for a walk or to the park, or they can play in the yard. “Often, when my son gets back from the activity he chose he says, ‘That was fun Mom, I’m glad I went,’” says Bielawski.
  3. Start an enjoyable, active family tradition. Bielawski hopes to start weekly hikes in the local nature preserve for her whole family. “My kids will have fun checking out the bugs and flowers,” she says. Other parents and kids might try regular bike rides, swims or bowling.
  4. Build activity into your daily routines. Do a few squats or other exercises while you stir the soup or wait for the laundry to dry. Park at the farthest end of the parking lot. Take the stairs or put on some music and just dance.
  5. Do something good for your body while doing good for others. If your kids are old enough, volunteer as a family for something physical, such as clearing brush for a conservation project or packing boxes for disaster relief.

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Impact of the 2010 US Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act

Impact of the 2010 US Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act on School Breakfast and Lunch Participation Rates Between 2008 and 2015.

OBJECTIVES: –
To evaluate National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) participation over a 7-year period before and after the implementation of the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA), which required healthier school lunch options beginning in school year (SY) 2012-2013 and healthier school breakfast options beginning in SY2013-2014.

METHODS: –
Data were gathered from low-income, high-minority public schools in 4 New Jersey cities. We conducted longitudinal analyses of annual average daily participation (ADP) in school meals among enrolled students overall and among those eligible for free or reduced-price meals. We used linear mixed models to compare NSLP and SBP participation rates from SY2008-2009 to SY2014-2015.

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12 tips for buying safe toys

Susan Stevens Martin from the American Academy of Pediatrics shared in the Daily Herald that whether they’re wrapped under a tree or exchanged with the lighting of a candle, giving gifts to children is a favorite part of winter holidays.

When choosing a toy for a child, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the toy be appropriate for the child’s age and stage of development. This makes it more likely the toy will engage the child — and reduces the risk it could cause injury.

If you are shopping for a toy for a child this holiday season, here are a few tips from the AAP.

1. Read the label. Warning labels give important information about how to use a toy and what ages the toy is safe for. Be sure to show your child how to use the toy the right way.

2. Look for learning toys. When choosing gifts for babies and toddlers, consider toys that will build developmental skills. Toys that can be manipulated, such as shape sorters, stacking blocks, and baby-safe puzzles, are great for developing fine motor, cognitive, and perceptual skills.

3. Think LARGE. If you are buying a toy for a child under age 3, make sure all toys and parts are larger than the child’s mouth to prevent choking. Read more

How to manage sibling rivalry

Advocate Children’s Hospital shared that for parents, there is no way around it. Having more than one child likely means one thing in your household; rivalry. And while all the bickering and competition may be irritating and stressful, rivalry is not such a bad thing when handled properly.

In fact, it can actually help build necessary lifelong skills and lead your kids to a healthier life.

No matter what the age difference, tension and conflicts tend to arise between siblings over a variety of things, ranging in severity.

“The way siblings handle these conflicts depends on several factors, but the most important is how they are taught by their parents to manage them,” says Dr. Joanna Lindell, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at Advocate Children’s Hospital. “If you can remember the acronym PEACE, these five tips may bring peace to your home, at least most of the time.”

P: Pick and choose which rivalries to leave alone and which ones to intervene on.

Typically, small squabbles should be left for siblings to try to resolve on their own. However, the second it starts to get emotionally abusive, like insulting remarks, and/or physically abusive, parents must quickly jump in and address the conflict.

E: Eliminate equality. While children think in terms of “fair” a lot, the world mostly does not. So the earlier kids are taught this concept, the more adaptable they can become.

Example: “Just because your older sister got a new back pack does not mean you have to have one.”

Explain reasons for things.

“She had hers for a long time and it is worn out, you just got a new one last year. But we can look at some new tennis shoes next week for you, since you’ve had yours for a while and they have holes in them.”

A: Alone one-on-one time with a parent is essential.

This “special” time (a lot of sources highly recommend using the word “special” a lot) will help build each parent-child relationship and decrease resentments.

The one thing every child wants more than anything is the attention of his/her parents and will tend to fight their sibling for it, unless it is given enough.

C: Comparisons; just don’t go there, especially in front of the other sibling.

This will only make one child feel worse about him or herself and the other one gloat. It’s not the best lesson to teach.

Additionally, if possible and appropriate, separate each sibling when intervening in these situations. This will allow you to listen to each child’s side, let them cool off, and deal with each at their developmental level.

E: Expectations; set them!

Kids do thrive on structure and rules, as much as they resist it. The clearer you can be on what is and is not appropriate, the better.

Practice the “hands-to-self” rule, encourage empathic behavior and responses and schedule family meetings to resolve disagreements, if necessary.

“Teaching your children PEACE is actually a good way to prepare them for life and for building relationships with others along the way,” adds Dr. Lindell.

• Children’s health is a continuing series. This week’s article is courtesy of Advocate Children’s Hospital. For more information, visit www. advocatechildrenshospital.com.

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