The Easy Way To Health

College of DuPage Nursing Student Anna Yatskevich shared that according to the CDC, The physical activity guidelines for Americans recommend that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity. This is not great news for many adults for whom the idea of incorporating physical exercise into an already full day of work, school or both, is less than desirable.

If finding the time of day is not an issue, many people are put off by the prices many gyms are asking for membership.

Fortunately, there is a solution that is not only free but can be done at your own pace. Walking is one of the easiest and possibly most relaxing ways of getting your daily exercise in.  Not only will you reap great benefits such as decreasing your risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic diseases, but it’s a great way to release the stress of the day and improve your mood.

It’s also a great way to shed some pounds as depending on your weight, walking at a leisurely pace of 2.5 miles per hour can burn approximately 600 – 700 calories in the prescribed 150 minutes of recommended daily exercise. So, go ahead; take the easy way out and get healthy!

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How to Make an Exercise Plan

 from the National Institute on Aging at NIH shared that some people can plunge into a new project without planning ahead. Others find that writing a plan is helpful and keeps them on track. When it comes to motivation, the first few months are crucial. If you can stick with physical activities you enjoy, it’s a good sign that you will be able to make exercise and physical activity a regular part of your everyday life. An exercise and physical activity plan might be a good way to help you:

  • Stay motivated to include physical activity as part of your daily life.
  • Be organized so you can fit exercise and physical activity into your current lifestyle.
  • Know what you need to move forward. Do you need to get new exercise shoes or clothes? Do you need equipment, like weights or a tennis racket? Will you have expenses (like health club fees) that you need to fit into your budget?

What to Include in Your Physical Activity Plan

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Beyond Wrinkles: Fixes for Later-in-Life Skin Issues

Barbara Stepko, AARP,  shared that whether you’ve coasted for decades with a flawless complexion or bumped along with a breakout or two, most people find that at a certain age their skin demands some extra attention. Years of sun exposure may bring discoloration. Your skin barrier, designed to latch onto moisture, weakens, causing dryness and irritation. Collagen begins to break down, leaving you with a lackluster look. And what’s with those spots that seem to pop up overnight? If you’re not loving what you’re seeing in the mirror, read on for doctors’ best advice to make age spots, redness and more history.

Rosacea

What it is. Basically, a less charming form of blushing. The main symptoms of this inflammatory skin disease are redness, broken blood vessels (which appear on the cheeks and nose but can find their way to the forehead and chin) and, in some cases, acne-like bumps. It’s typically found in fair-skinned adults, usually women. In a survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society, 39 percent of the participants said their rosacea first appeared after the age of 50.

What causes it. The exact cause is unknown though the condition tends to run in families. “It’s also thought to be brought on by hyperactive blood vessels underneath the skin’s surface,” says Elizabeth Martin, a Birmingham, Alabama–based dermatologist. Another possible cause: microscopic mites, called Demodex, that release bacteria into the skin when they die, which can lead to inflammation. “Everyone has these mites inside their skin, particularly on the face, but people with rosacea can have an overconcentration,” says Martin. Studies show that people with rosacea may have more than 10 times the Demodex mites on their skin as those without the condition. Read more

How to Set Your Fitness Goals

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Reality Illinois

Reality Illinois is a youth coalition dedicated to positive youth development and prevention of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. There are currently two chapters of Reality in DuPage. One group is comprised of high school students and led by Gilda Ross. The other is fairly new and is comprised of Middle School students and is led by Liz Seybold.

Reality Middle School chapter is the newest chapter, beginning in April of 2018. Since the group’s inception, they have already accomplished a great deal. Students have worked with the Lombard Park District and posted the smoke-free park signs, cleaned up cigarette butts and other debris at Madison Meadows park and participated in a Sticker Shock campaign meant to educate adult consumers of alcohol that providing alcohol to minors is dangerous and illegal. Outside of these community projects, the group has regular meetings where they are educated about topics such as; prescription drug abuse, harmful effects of nicotine/tobacco products, the dangers of vaping, and on the opioid crisis, our community is currently facing.  Read more

How to keep your New Year’s resolutions

Ginny Grimsley shared in a Daily Herald article that if you’re one of the millions of Americans who will make a promise to improve yourself this New Year, there’s bad news: You’re 92 percent likely to fail in sticking to your resolutions, says a recent study from the University of Scranton’s Journal of Clinical Psychology.

About 45 percent of Americans make resolutions. Ranking at the top is losing weight and staying fit and healthy ranks No. 5.

“Of course, those statistics represent the average – you don’t have to be average,” says Dr. Virender Sodhi, founder of the Ayurvedic and Naturopathic Medical Clinic. “There are plenty of things individuals can do to improve their odds of success if they resolve to become healthier and fitter.”

Dr. Sodhi, author of the new guide, “Ayurvedic Herbs: The Comprehensive Resource for Ayurvedic Healing Solutions,” believes we can move much closer to a world of disease-free societies by following the laws of Mother Nature. Individual commitment to health via New Year’s resolutions is one path to take us there. Dr. Sodhi offers five tips for staying true to your goals.

• Get away from the instant-gratification mentality and avoid unrealistic goals. Don’t expect to go from zero to 60 — 60 being your ideal body image — in just a few months, especially if you have little background in training. Unfortunately, most who have resolutions like losing plenty of weight and quitting smoking are used to easy snack foods and quick rewards. Health is long-term labor of love; commit to the love and wait for results.

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Sleep Guide For Anxiety

Alyssa with http://www.purple.comPurplethism  just published this guide on the relationship between anxiety, mental health, and quality of sleep

Anxiety comes in many forms, from the general worry that comes from everyday life to the intense fear caused by major psychiatric disorders. As debilitating as anxiety can be to our mental and physical health, it’s also corrosive to our quality of sleep—whether you’re a college student pulling an all-nighter or a veteran jolted awake from a nightmare caused by PTSD.

This guide covers how anxiety and sleep are interrelated, change with age, and what you can do to improve both.

Anxiety and Sleep

Nearly 40 million people in the US experience an anxiety disorder in any given year. More than 40 million Americans also suffer from chronic, long-term sleep disorders. Those numbers aren’t a coincidence. Anxiety and sleep are intimately connected: The less sleep you get, the more anxious you feel. The more anxious you feel, the less sleep you get. It’s a cycle many insomnia and anxiety sufferers find hard to break.

Common anxiety symptoms like restlessness, increased heart rate, rapid breathing, and gastrointestinal (GI) problems make it difficult to fall asleep.

Because insomnia and anxiety are so closely linked, one of the first steps in treatment is to determine which is causing the other — that is, which is the primary cause and which is the secondary symptom. “Sometimes, insomnia is secondary,” says psychotherapist Brooke Sprowl, “in that it is caused by another primary disorder such as depression, anxiety, or a medical condition. In this case, usually treating the primary disorder [improves] the insomnia.”

Whether insomnia is the primary or secondary cause, natural remedies like magnesium glycinate and melatonin have been shown to help with sleep, says Sprowl. Non-medication treatments like cognitive behavior therapyalong with good sleep hygiene are also effective at combating insomnia and anxiety. Read more

10 Benefits of Physical Activity

Karin A. Bilich wrote in Explore Parents that when many people decide to “get fit,” they assume it involves rigorous activity. But you don’t have to spend hours in a gym to be physically active. People can get in shape by performing everyday activities in the home. Every time you and your child throw a softball, swim a lap, climb a flight of stairs, walk to the store, or carry packages, your health and fitness levels are improving.

When someone is physically fit, she feels and looks better, and she stays healthier. The earlier a child starts getting in shape, the more she’ll reduce her risk of numerous illnesses. Here are some of the benefits that physical activity offers your child:

1. It strengthens the heart. The heart is a muscle. Like other muscles, its performance improves when it’s regularly challenged by exercise. The heart responds to exercise by becoming stronger and more efficient. Strengthening the heart muscle can help ward off heart disease — the leading cause of death in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services — even in early childhood.

2. It helps keep arteries and veins clear. Exercise reduces the amount of harmful cholesterol and fats in a person’s blood. It increases the flexibility of the walls of blood vessels and helps to lower blood pressure. This can reduce a person’s risk for heart attack and stroke.

3. It strengthens the lungs. Working hard increases lung capacity and their efficiency in moving air in and out of the body. As a result, more oxygen is drawn into the body and more carbon dioxide and other waste gases are expelled. Regular exercise helps prevent the decline in oxygen intake that occurs naturally with age or as a result of inactivity.

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Kids Aren’t Getting Much Exercise

Kate Elizabeth Queram, a Staff Correspondent for Government Executive’s Route Fifty and based in Washington, D.C. shared that more than three-fourths of children nationally between the ages of 6 and 17 do not get enough daily physical activity, and activity levels vary depending on gender and other factors, according to a recent national report card.

The 2018 United States Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth, released this month, provides a comprehensive assessment of activity levels by reviewing and summarizing national health statistics and data from multiple national surveys. Metrics are broken into nine indicators, including overall physical activity, health-related fitness and sedentary behaviors like watching television or playing video games. Each metric is given a letter grade, from A to F.

The report, released by a subcommittee of the nonprofit coalition National Physical Activity Plan, aims to assess overall levels of physical activity among minors but also to serve as an advocacy tool to help parents and policymakers “implement new initiatives, programs, and policies in support of healthy environments to improve the physical activity levels and health of our children and youth.”

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American Children’s Level of Exercise

The Editor of Children’s and Nature Network reported that a team of researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio have uncovered some startling information about the amount of exercise the average U.S. child gets in a week.

According to the study, a majority of children are not getting the recommended amount of physical activity they need, and only 5% are meeting the goal of 60 minutes per day.

While this may come as a surprise to some, not everyone will be shocked by these findings.

Research has found that kids are spending more time on smartphones, tablets, or TV every year.

They also discovered that only one hour of screen time can increase a child’s chance of becoming anxious or depressed.

These results are worrisome because young children are in desperate need of physical activity.

Exercise is important for healthy growth and development, increasing bone density and strengthening muscles.

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