ProActive Kids Summer Session at Good Samaritan Health & Wellness Center

logoProActive Kids teaches kids and their families fun ways to improve health through Exercise, Nutritional Lessons, and Open Discussion over 8 weeks. This life-changing experience is offered FREE to kids ages 8-14 who want to learn new exercises, lose weight, eat right and be more confident. (BMI must be in 85th percentile or above to participate).

UPCOMING SESSIONS
Summer 2014 June 9 – August 1
Fall 2014 September 15 – November 7
DAYS AND TIMES
Monday and Wednesday
Fitness and Lifestyle (Kids Only): 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Friday Family Day
Fitness, Nutrition and Lifestyle: 5:00 – 7:00 pm
WHERE
Good Samaritan Health and Wellness Center
3551 Highland Avenue
Downers Grove, IL 60515

For more information and to enroll, please go to: www.proactivekids.org.
Please submit any inquiries to info@proactivekids.org or call 630.681.1558

Take the first step toward a healthy future. Sign up today to enroll your child and family in ProActive Kids’ next session.   Read more

3 Steps to Healthy Eating For Teens

Between media messages (including social media) and commercials that distort ideas of acceptable body images, glorify junk food and fast food and hype crazy fad diets that are all too accessible for impressionable teens, it’s vital for parents to take extra steps to ensure their teen maintains healthy eating habits that can make it easy to maintain a healthy weight and good health for life.  The following are some important steps to healthy eating for teens.

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1.  Breakfast is a Must

Many teens skip breakfast, but it’s not a good idea because breakfast helps teens (and everyone else in the household for that matter), with doing well in school through its impact on brain function, concentration and energy, and it helps with maintaining a healthy weight.

An ideal healthy breakfast includes high quality protein like smoothies with whey protein, eggs (more egg white in proportion to whole eggs to balance cholesterol if they have them frequently) which can be made to go in a whole wheat pita, tortilla or English Muffin, turkey bacon (nitrate free if possible) or a quality energy bar like Quest Nutrition bars made from whey protein.

2.  A Clean Plate is Not Always a Good Thing

Many of the weight loss coaching clients I work with today who struggle with weight issues can trace the messages of “clean your plate” drilled into them as a child, and often with the addition of “don’t you know there are children starving in the world” to magnify the guilt of leaving the table without finishing everything.  While you want your kids to have sufficient nutrition, it’s really beneficial to help them develop the good habit of using their own body cues to tell them when they have had enough food.

3.  Don’t Stigmatize Food

Don’t tell your teens that a food is “bad” or “good.”  All food is fuel, of course some fuel is a better choice than others, and what we have is simply a matter of choice.  You want to refer to foods in a context like “everyday” or “always” instead of “good,” and “sometimes” or “every now and then” foods instead of “bad.”

This is another common thing I have to work on with my coaching clients who have weight challenges that’s been ingrained since they were very little who often refer to themselves as “being bad” or “being good” when they consume certain foods.  When a food is dubbed as “bad” teens can end up with guilty feelings about it which could lead to eating disorders.  It also can become more desirable as something forbidden or rebellious and can foster cravings that lead to overindulgence or even bingeing that would not be the case if the food was not given special status.

Healthy Lombard Partner and Certified Health and Wellness Coach Melanie Jordan specializes in helping others get back to their dream weight for good without gimmicks or deprivation.  Weight Loss Coach Melanie really “gets” those who are challenged with losing and maintaining their weight as she has successfully overcome her own weight struggles and kept off 48 pounds.  Melanie is also an ACE Certified Group Exercise Instructor and Silver Sneakers FLEX Instructor specializing in Senior Fitness (Zumba Gold® Licensed, Ageless Grace® Certified Educator and Silver Sneakers® Classic Exercise and Circuit Training Certified).

Copyright 2014 Your Healthy Life Made Easy LLC

 

DCHD Announces Every Kid Healthy Week

3495411871-1In recognition of Every Kid Healthy Week, the DuPage County Health Department is offering some ideas on how schools can take small steps to make big changes when it comes to the health of their students.

Every Kid Healthy Week™ is an effort created by Action for Healthy Kids®, a non-profit organization that fights childhood obesity, undernourishment and physical inactivity by helping schools become healthier places so kids can live healthier lives. During this national observance and throughout the month of April, schools across the country are encouraged to host events that will make sustainable changes that encourage students to eat better and be active every day.

To celebrate Every Kid Healthy Week™, schools can implement wellness initiatives to promote and reinforce healthy eating, physical activity and nutrition education. Some events taking place across the county include:

  •  Hosting a healthy food taste test event
  •  Organizing a family fitness night
  • Incorporating fitness breaks into the classroom curriculum

FORWARD, a county-wide, public-private partnership of the DuPage County Health Department, that is also working to fight obesity, offers resources for schools working to make healthy changes. For more information or to access our resources, visit www.forwarddupage.org.

Schools already participating in Every Kid Healthy Week are encouraged to share their planned events by registering the event on the Every Kid Healthy Calendar by going to, https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2014EKHWeek.

For more information on the DuPage County Health Department, follow us on Twitter @DuPageHD or become a fan on Facebook.

 

How Much Screen Time for Kids?

young-kids-digital-media-useOn April 7, the Daily Herald posted the following article by Kendall Powell from the Washington Post:

As most parents know by now, the experts say we should limit our kids’ screen time or risk raising socially stunted couch potatoes.

Last fall, the American Academy of Pediatrics released updated guidelines for children and adolescents using media, recommending no more than two hours per day of any type of entertainment screen time for kids ages 3 to 18 and none for children 2 or younger. The guidelines cover media such as Internet and texting as well as TV, movies and video games.

As a science writer, I wondered how the AAP decided on that limit, which seems arbitrary and simplistic. As a mother raising a 3-year-old and a 6-year-old in a house full of glowing screens, I wondered, how would I ever enforce it?

Victor Strasburger, a professor of pediatrics at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque and an AAP spokesman, explained that the two-hour cutoff comes from several large studies that have followed the television-watching habits and health of children over decades.

“Over two hours per day, and the more time spent in front of a screen, the higher the risk of obesity,” he said. Read more

Rethink Your Drink

o-KID-DRINKING-SODA-facebookFORWARD shared that if you need ideas on how to educate people about the harmful effects of sugary beverages, the  Illinois Alliance to Prevent Obesity has created the “Rethink Your Drink” Toolkit with lots of ideas and activities for both kids and adults.

Great Resource!

Yoga Diet

yogzfoodYoga expert Wai Lana, who has a daily exercise program on public television shared

According to the science of yoga, we can compare our bodies to vehicles that we use to travel the path of life. The food we eat is like the fuel we put in the gas tank—the better the fuel, the better the vehicle performs. What we eat has a huge impact not only on our physical well-being, but also on our mental and our spiritual well-being. So our diet is a vital component of the yoga lifestyle.

The ancient yoga texts describe the foods that benefit our physical health and stamina, our mental clarity, and our spiritual well-being, as sweet, juicy, palatable, and easy to digest.  They include fruits and vegetables, milk products, sugar and honey, grains, and nuts and seeds, as well as beans and other legumes.

Research confirms that a diet centered on the foods that comprise the yoga diet can help prevent obesity and diseases such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and arthritis and reduce LDL cholesterol levels. These foods also help maintain a healthy body weight, boost our immunity, and may even slow the aging process.

These foods and the countless delicious preparations made from them form the basis of the yoga diet. Because of their inherent qualities of goodness and natural health-giving properties, they are ideal for anyone wanting to live a healthier, happier life.

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Being Healthy is as easy as 5-4-3-2-1 Go! ®

54321_Exclamation_PointMarch is National Nutrition Month and the DuPage County Health Department s encouraging residents to live the 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® lifestyle in order to be healthy and reduce the risk for obesity. Nationally, nearly 1 in 3 children are overweight or obese. Kids who are overweight are more likely to suffer from chronic diseases, like high blood pressure and Type 2 Diabetes. Children who are overweight are also more likely to suffer psychological effects such as bullying and depression.  Fortunately, everyone can take steps toward leading a healthier lifestyle. The 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® message  was created for children ages 3-5 as an easy way to remember the goals to try and meet every day in order to be healthy, but this message also applies to anyone who is striving to live a healthy lifestyle.  The components of the health education message are: eating 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day, drinking 4 glasses of water per day, eating 3 servings of low-fat dairy per day, getting 2 hours or less of screen time per day, and getting 1 hour or more of exercise every day. The 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® message was created by the Consortium to Lower Obesity in Chicago Children (CLOCC) and adopted by FORWARD, the Health Department’s obesity prevention initiative. Since adopting this message, FORWARD has distributed 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® posters, stickers, flyers, and magnets across DuPage County to raise awareness and  free 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® health education programs have been offered in daycares and schools across the county. For ideas and resources on how to use the 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® message in your organizationor classroom, please visit [ http://www.forwarddupage.org ]www.forwarddupage.org. 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® is a registered trademark and Copyright © 2004 Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. All rights reserved. [ http://www.clocc.net ]www.clocc.net

Toddlers show progress in battle against obesity

Healthy SnackON February 26, 2014, Mike Stobbe, Associated Press wrote: Toddler obesity shrank sharply in the past decade, a new study suggests. While promising, it’s not proof that the nation has turned a corner in the battle against childhood obesity, some experts say.

The finding comes from a government study considered a gold-standard gauge of trends in the public’s health. The researchers found that obesity among children ages 2 to 5 decreased — to 8 percent, from 14 percent a decade ago. That would represent a 43 percent drop.

But the only decline was seen in preschoolers, not in older children. And some experts note that even the improvement in toddlers wasn’t a steady decline, and say it’s hard to know yet whether preschooler weight figures are permanently curving down or merely jumping around. Read more

February is Hearth Healthy Month

scaleThe Shaklee Corporation in its Health and Wellness Update has published several great article about how to keep your heath healthy.  The one below caught my eye and I thought it would a good article to share.

Weight Is a Heart Issue – What is being overweight?
Overweight and obesity are both defined by Body Mass Index or BMI (which is a ratio of weight to height). A BMI between 25 and 30 places someone in an overweight category and 30 or higher is considered obese.

 

Why control your weight?

The classifications of overweight and obese are not simply labels; there is a dramatic increase in the likelihood of disease as people increase their BMI, such as:

  • Coronary artery disease (CAD)
  • Certain cancers
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol and triglycerides
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Sleep apnea
  • Stroke
  • Type 2 diabetes

Even having a few extra pounds greatly increases the risk of heart disease.  In a 14 year study, it was shown that moderately overweight (not obese) individuals have an increased risk of heart disease. 50 percent for womeni and over 70 percent for menii

 

The cost of being overweight
Obesity itself is not what causes the harm; it is the diseases that are associated with obesity that cause the harm. The costs of these diseases and syndromes are enormous, and that doesn’t even begin to calculate the personal, physical, and emotional problems associated with increased BMI.

  • Obese people are expected to live 2-4 years less than someone with a healthy weight; the extremely obese (BMI over 40) have 8-10 years taken off their life expectancy. ii
  • More than one-third of adults in the U.S. are considered overweight and another one-third are obese.
  • The medical costs associated with obesity are estimated at over $150 billion dollars.
  • Obese people cost an average of $1,429 more in medical services per year than someone who is normal weight.

Read more