Don’t Worry About All the Calories on Thanksgiving

 Jacqueline Andriakos wrote in SELF’s Food Healthy Eating section  that during the week leading up to Thanksgiving,

it’s easy to get wrapped up in healthy side dish recipes, tips for avoiding holiday weight gain, and pre-turkey workouts that make room for an extra slice of pie. But for some people, all that strategizing sucks the joy right out of a day that’s supposed to be about celebrating gratitude with loved ones over lots of delicious food.

“I tell people all the time, if you’re looking forward to Thanksgiving, or any special occasion dining experience, go all out. Eat what you want. Then get back up on the horse again,” says Liz Weinandy, RD, a nutritionist with the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. “But for a lot of people, this is easier said than done because they worry one meal makes or breaks everything.”

How much does one meal really matter?

One single indulgent meal—even one whole day of high-calorie eating—is “absolutely not going to destroy anyone’s metabolism, cause them to gain some tremendous amount of weight, or ruin longer-term goals,” says Weinandy. To gain a notable amount of weight, you’d need to continuously consume more calories than your body can burn over the course of several days.

“Let’s take a person who consumes 2,000 calories daily and maintains her weight,” Weinandy says. “Say she eats 5,000 calories on Thanksgiving. Her body is going to have to store 3,000 extra calories because it can’t burn them.” But she won’t even gain a whole pound. (One pound of fat is equivalent to 3,500 calories.) The amount of weight she’ll put on is simply not worth agonizing over, especially at the expense of enjoying the holiday, says Weinandy. Plus, she’ll burn all those calories off in the days to come, by returning to her regular eating habits and workout routine.

Craig Primack, MD, an obesity medicine specialist at the Scottsdale Weight Loss Center in Arizona, agrees that one big meal isn’t enough to cause a noticeable physical difference or weight fluctuation. Might you feel the effects of a fatty, sugary holiday dinner in other ways? Sure. “You’ll probably feel bloated, slightly dehydrated if you’re consuming alcoholic beverages, and potentially uncomfortably full,” says Dr. Primack. “But people know this going in.”

What really matters, says Dr. Primack, is how Thanksgiving influences your behavior in the following days. “It’s worth keeping in mind that you’re going into a four-day weekend full of leftovers,” he says. “And four days of eating off track can definitely have consequences, like weight gain or un-programming all of your great healthy habits. It’s about the bigger picture, not the one meal.” Read more

Exercising with Pain

from the National Institute on Aging at NIH shared that Pain is your body’s way of warning you that something might be wrong. But that doesn’t necessarily mean you should avoid exercise. In fact, depending on the type of pain you have, exercise could actually help.

There are two kinds of pain—acute (temporary) and chronic (ongoing).

Acute Pain

Acute pain begins suddenly, lasts for a short time, and goes away as your body heals. There are many causes of acute pain. With exercise, sometimes acute pain can be caused by overdoing it, like lifting something that’s too heavy, or using the treadmill at a speed too fast for you to handle at your current fitness level. Practicing exercise safety is the best way you can prevent over-exercising. Set realistic goals and pace yourself. Begin your program slowly with low-intensity exercises and work up from there.

Acute pain can also follow an injury, like a strain, sprain, or break from a fallBalance exercises can help prevent falls that lead to these kinds of injuries.

 

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Healthy Kids Running Series

Healthy Lombard was proud to partner with Healthy Kids Running Series, a national, community-based non-profit that provides a fun, inclusive, five-week running series for ages 2-14 designed for kids to get active, experience accomplishment, and lay the foundation for a healthy lifestyle.

We look forward to working with them again next year.

They have another activity that kids can participate in right now!

They are hosting a Facebook Sharing Contest running through November 5th!  Anyone who enters will have the chance to win a brand new pair of New Balance 860v9 sneakers in their respective size and gender!

In order to enter, head over to Facebook, like the Healthy Kids Running Series page, and share the video pinned at the top of our page to your own timeline or page!!

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Flexibility matters

Marlene Cimons wrote for The Washington Post that from the 1960s to the late 1990s, fitness professionals firmly believed that static stretching was a useful adjunct before exercise, warming up the muscles and, in doing so, preventing injury.

Later, however, research suggested the opposite was true — that it caused muscle fatigue and slower sprinting times in elite athletes.

This prompted many of them to abandon it for “dynamic” stretching, which looks more like real exercise.

Today, many experts think a combination of both before a vigorous workout or competition is the best approach.

At the cellular level

To understand the controversy, it’s important to know what happens at the muscles’ cellular level during static stretching.

“Our muscles are made of thousands of muscle spindles — like hairs in a ponytail — that give the muscle cell the ability to stretch and contract by sliding past each other in a coordinated fashion,” said Michael Jonesco, an assistant clinical professor of sports medicine and internal medicine at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center. “Static stretching pulls on the cell to the max, and can cause some stretch injury that takes time to recover, and can, therefore, cause a temporary drop in performance.” Read more

Sneak More Movement Into Your Workday

Our Healthy Lombard Partner, DuPage Healthcare, LTD suggests that if you drive to work and park yourself in your office chair for hours, fitting exercise into your daily routine may seem daunting. But it doesn’t have to be.

Here are some easy ways to get moving:

Talk and walk. Whether you’re on a conference call or engaging in a brainstorming session, walk during the conversation.

Take the stairs. By choosing the stairs, you can add some significant steps to your day, depending on what floor you work on.

Just dance. If you have a standing desk, dance while you work. Put your headphones on and crank up your tunes. This approach, however, may be best for those working from home. Read more

How to Treat Jet Lag with Light

New clues to the “obesity paradox”

Those studies used body mass index (BMI), which depends only on a person’s weight and height, as a proxy for body fat. The new study estimated the body fat and lean mass (mostly muscle) of 38,000 men using weight, height, waist size, age, and race.

Over 21 years, those with the least body fat had the lowest risk of dying. As body fat rose, so did the risk of dying—most often of cardiovascular disease or cancer.

In contrast, men with the least muscle mass had a higher risk of dying (especially of respiratory illness) than those with an intermediate level of lean mass. Why? Low muscle mass could be a sign of undiagnosed illness or frailty, even in people with a “healthy” BMI.

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What is metabolic syndrome?

Neha Shah, M.D., who specializes in bariatric & obesity medicine and internal medicine at Edwards-Elmhurst Health share that if you carry a lot of weight around your waist, you’re boosting your risk for heart disease.

If you have high blood pressure or diabetes you are also at a higher risk.

When you have all three, you have what we call metabolic syndrome.

A metabolic syndrome is a group of risk factors that increase your chance of developing certain conditions. It’s not a disease in itself but describes the condition of having symptoms that could spur serious disease—such as heart attacks and stroke—down the road.

There are some things that put you at risk for metabolic syndrome (and, thus, a higher risk for future heart disease, diabetes or stroke). The more of these you have, the higher your risk: Read more

Ways to overcome slumping, text neck and more

Northwest Community Healthcare wrote that two physical therapists — Julie Schauble, and Shivangi Potdar, — who help patients at Northwest Community Healthcare, provide some answers, addressing the effects of poor posture and ways to combat it.

Q: Why do we tend to slump?

Schauble: An upright, lengthened, tall, decompressed posture requires active muscle control. We have to activate our core/postural muscles. When we slump, we sink into gravity as it pulls us downward. Though slumping takes less active muscle activation and energy, it causes increased compression on joints and surrounding soft tissue, which ultimately causes more pain.

Q: Why are more people turning to physical therapy to correct things like poor posture?

Potdar: What we’re finding out is that a lot of the first line of defense for musculoskeletal problems is physical therapy. It’s noninvasive, less cost to the insurance than expensive tests and surgeries, and it’s much more convenient for patients.

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Why pediatricians are prescribing play time for kids

CBS News shared that when 4-year-old Britton Taunton-Rigby recently got her yearly checkup, her pediatrician wrote a prescription for something he says is important. It reads, “Play Every Day.”

New guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends all pediatricians do the same. The organization says playing with parents and peers is a critical part of a child’s healthy development, fundamental for learning life skills and reducing stress.

“Play is not frivolous: it enhances brain structure and function and promotes executive function,” the report, published this week, states.

The AAP and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend children get one hour of physical activity per day, as well as one hour of simple, creative play.

Lead author of the report, Dr. Michael Yogman, says play often gets a bad rap as being a waste of time, which he says is highly inaccurate.

“Play is really brain building because it has all kinds of effects on brain structure and function,” he told CBS News. “Executive function skills, learning to persist on a task, learning to solve problems, learning to be flexible about how they are learning things. It’s how we learn, not what we learn.” Read more