Take a look at your nighttime routine

Learning well: Plan for a healthy start to the school year

Laura Milani Alessio, from the American Academy of Pediatrics, shared that freshly sharpened pencils, glue sticks and other supplies top the back-to-school checklist for many families. Making sure children have everything they need to stay healthy and safe, however, also is essential to a successful year of learning.

“To thrive in school, every child needs a nutritious diet, enough exercise, sleep, and other basic building blocks of wellness,” said pediatrician Sandra Hassink, who leads the American Academy of Pediatrics Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight. “Study after study shows that healthy students are better able to learn,” she said.

  • Food for thought: Research shows that children who eat a nutritious breakfast have improved concentration and memory, get better grades and score higher on standardized tests. Healthy school lunches also are an important part of a child’s overall nutrition. To supply enough nutrients and energy to last the day, meals should include whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, and lean protein and dairy foods. Limit highly processed products and sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda.
  • Active bodies, active brains: Building an hour’s worth of exercise into the daily routine helps keep children’s bodies — and brains — strong.  Physically active students tend to have better grades, school attendance, classroom behavior and cognitive function. Because the best exercise for younger children is active play, the AAP supports daily recess in schools.
  • Arriving Safely: Walking or riding a bicycle to school is a great way to get exercise, but make sure the route is safe, and teach your child traffic safety rules. Children should always wear a helmet while riding a bike or skateboard. If your child rides a bus to school, it should have seat belts.
  • ABCs and Zzz’s: Students need between 8 and 12 hours of sleep each night. Skimping on sleep can affect their health, behavior and academic performance. Because teens naturally fall asleep later, the AAP recommends middle and high schools start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. Light from smartphones, TVs and devices can disrupt sleep, so turn them off at least an hour before bed. Read more

Skin care for athletes who train in the sun

Health Local Is Back in Lombard!

Health Local is a magazine-style monthly cable show that features segments on Healthy Hints, Exercises, Demonstrations of Easy to Follow Recipes, and advice from Health Professionals. After a brief “vacation,” the show is once again being shown on Lombard’s Cable Station

(times listed below.)

 

The Goals of Health Local are to:
• Make physical activity an integral and routine part of life,
• Create food and beverage environments that ensure that healthy food and beverage      options are the routine, easy choice, and
• Transform messages about physical activity and nutrition.

 

The show is comprised of short 5 – 7 minutes segments that feature:

  • Chef’s Corner (cooking segments sometimes featuring students),
  • The Doctor is In, (quick health tips by local or well known physicals and/nutritionists)
  • Work Out Room, (segments from Health Tracks, Glenbard High Schools, etc.)
  • Life Long Lessons (healthy hints for seniors)
  • Healthy Hints, (hints shared by attendees at health fairs, NUHS students, COD Nursing Students, and other healthy activities), and
  • Generation H (H stands for Healthy – in this segment, students share there favorite exercise of a healthy hints).

The DuPage County Health Department also contributes many segments for the show.

Health Local is aired 4 times a month on Tuesdays at 4:30 PM on Comcast Channel 19 airing in the towns of:

  • Addison
  • Aurora
  •  Bensenville
  • Bloomingdale
  • Carol Stream
  • Darian
  • Downers Grove
  • Elmhurst
  • Glendale Heights
  • Glen Ellyn
  • Itasca
  • Lisle
  • Lombard,
  • Medina
  • Naperville
  • Oakbrook Terrace
  • Oakbrook
  • Roselle
  • Warrenville,
  • Wayne
  • Westmont
  • Wheaton
  • Winfield
  • Wood Dale and
  • Unincorporated Villa Park

It also airs on the Lombard Channel 6 & ATT&T U-verse Channel 99 (Lombard) on Sundays at 12 Noon, Wednesday at Noon and 11 PM, Fridays at 10 AM, and Saturdays at 5 PM.

Single segments are also uploaded to the Healthy Lombard YouTube Channel.  (www.youtube.com/healthylombard). That way, individuals who do not have cable can still view them.

Would you like to be on the show? Contact our producer at:  Jay@healthylombard.com

Glenbard Parent Series (GPS): Navigating Healthy Families

GPS is an educational consortium dedicated to presenting distinguished, engaging speakers who share their knowledge, cutting-edge research and life experiences. In doing this, we provide opportunities to inspire and enrich families as well as build strong communities that are both proactive and informed.

Our mission is to enhance our students’ social and emotional learning, encourage responsible decision-making, foster positive growth and development, and promote respectful relationships in school and the community at large.

The powerful Glenbard Parent Series is a nationally recognized, unique, extraordinary resource for parents, educators and community members to encourage conversation around the opportunities and issues facings families today.

Please join us for the free forums hosted at Glenbard West, East, North, and South high schools, the Community Consolidated School District 93 Administration Center, Marquardt School District 15 Administration Center and the McAninch Arts Center (MAC) at the College of DuPage.

Programs are offered free of charge, no registration is required and all are welcome.

Students, parents (elementary and high school) school staff and professionals are welcome to attend, strengthening home and community partnerships in pursuit of our mutual goals to inspire, empower and succeed.

Click Here to check out 2017-18 Glenbard Parent Series lineup

Serious Eye Condition Being Misdiagnosed?

Gabrielle deGroot Redford,wrote for the AATP online newsletter that a new JAMA Ophthalmology study found that one in every four cases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) was missed by trained eye care professionals, a finding that could have serious implications for the growing population of older adults most at risk of developing the sight-robbing disease.

Researchers at the University of Alabama, Birmingham reexamined 644 patients (average age 69) who had undergone a dilated eye exam by an ophthalmologist or optometrist and discovered that fully 25 percent of those whose eyes had been deemed to be normal actually showed signs of AMD, the leading cause of irreversible vision loss for Americans age 50 and older in the U.S.

“As the baby boomer population comes into the years when age-related macular degenerationbecomes more prevalent, we need to make sure that patients are properly diagnosed,” says lead study author David Neely, M.D., of the University of Alabama, Birmingham. “Fortunately in our study, no cases of the advanced form of the disease were missed.”

AMD affects 14 million Americans and is characterized by a loss of central vision, making everyday activities like reading, driving and watching television difficult. As the population ages, the number of people with the disease is expected to increase significantly.

While there is no cure, researchers have discovered ways to slow the progression of AMD through nutritional supplementation and, in more severe cases, with injectable anti-VEGF medications that shrink the abnormal blood vessels that are a hallmark of the advanced stages of the disease. Read more

Bullies use a small but powerful weapon to torment allergic kids: peanuts

Our gut talks and sometimes argues with our brain

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Probiotics With Your Pizza?

Probiotics once appeared mostly in yogurt, plugged by Jamie Lee Curtis in television commercials (and mocked on Saturday Night Live). Now, new cereals, snacks and beverages from Kraut Krisps to Gut Punches and Wellness Waters are featuring the microorganisms touted to help digestive and immune systems function.

Mariani’s Probiotic Prunes say they “deliver active cultures 10 times more effectively than yogurt.” Brad’s Raw Foods LLC’s kale chips has added “shielded probiotics to promote digestive and immune health.” The number of food products in the U.S. making a probiotic-related claim has nearly tripled to more than 500 in the last five years, according to food market research firm Innova Market Insights.

The additions come as consumers are looking for medicinal, in addition to nutritional, benefits from their food. “People now want food to be functionally formulated, not just delicious,” says Elizabeth Moskow, culinary director for food consultancy Sterling-Rice Group in Boulder, Colo. Many stores stock the probiotic-infused foods, but some retailers filter the offerings, skeptical of some of the claims that otherwise less-healthy foods may make.

New strains of probiotics don’t require refrigeration. These newer spore-forming strains produce coated cell structures that help extend probiotics’ shelf life. Still, most probiotics can’t survive heat, processing or air exposure and often degrade with time. Read more