Can what you eat prevent Alzheimer’s?

Nina Lundberg, MD wrote for the Edwards-Elmhurst blog that as we age, our brains get a little slower on the draw.

You might forget where you put your keys, or what time your appointment is. You may even forget what day it is or the name of a famous actor you like, but you recover and remember fairly quickly.When your memory loss disrupts your daily life – you can’t retrace your steps and find your missing keys, or you can’t tell what season it is – it could be a sign of Alzheimer’s disease.

Your next question may be: how do I prevent this from happening to me?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a clear-cut prevention method. Alzheimer’s disease and dementia evolve because of a combination of factors such as your age, genetics, medical conditions and environment.

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Can Apple Cider Vinegar Fix All Your Problems?

KATE CHYNOWETH shared in the MYFITENESSPAL Blog that Spring cleaning isn’t just for closets. After months of cold weather and cravings for rich meals, our bodies deserve a reset. Thanks in part to an ever-expanding selection of health drinks, this question burns as intensely for some as a teaspoon of ACV on a sore throat. Rumors are its health benefits include everything from increased energy and weight loss to improved digestion. Yet many of the claims associated with it remain unproven, so let’s to take a closer look at the trend.

 

IT IS GOOD FOR GUT FLORA

Unpasteurized apple cider vinegar is rich in enzymes and probiotics, much like other raw fermented liquids such as kombucha. Probiotics aid digestion, keep us “regular” and prevent bloating (as yogurt commercials have informed us for years). Yet those benefits only are gained if you ingest the raw stuff sold by all-natural producers such as Bragg, because pasteurization kills probiotic strains. You’ll know you’ve hit the jackpot when you see cobwebby strands of the “mother” floating in your bottle of amber liquid. If you’re looking for a way to wake up and energize your digestion, a morning shot of apple cider vinegar might make sense.

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The Number 1 Sleep Mistake

When your schedule is all over the place, your circadian rhythm, or body clock, doesn’t have a chance to normalize. Your internal body clock is one of the most important factors driving sleepiness and wakefulness, Joseph Ojile, M.D., medical director of the Clayton Sleep Institute, tells SELF. “When [your life and circadian rhythm] line up correctly, you have a much better chance of getting to sleep and getting up when you want,” Ojile says. If you don’t have a consistent schedule, your body struggles to give you the right cues when you need them. Read more

Prevent Mosquito Bites

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention shared that the most effective way to avoid getting sick from viruses spread by mosquitoes when at home and during travel is to prevent mosquito bites.

Mosquito bites can be more than just annoying and itchy. They can spread viruses that make you sick or, in rare cases, cause death. Although most kinds of mosquitoes are just nuisance mosquitoes, some kinds of mosquitoes in the United States and around the world spread viruses that can cause disease.

Mosquitoes bite during the day and night, live indoors and outdoors, and search for warm places as temperatures begin to drop. Some will hibernate in enclosed spaces, like garages, sheds, and under (or inside) homes to survive cold temperatures. Except for the southernmost states in North America, mosquito season starts in the summer and continues into fall.

Prevention

  • Use insect repellent: When used as directed, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breastfeeding women. Use an EPA-registered insect repellent with one of the following active ingredients:
    • DEET
    • Picaridin
    • IR3535
    • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE)
    • Para-menthane-diol (PMD)
    • 2-undecanone
  • Cover up: Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Keep mosquitoes outside: Use air conditioning, or window and door screens. If you are not able to protect yourself from mosquitoes inside your home or hotel, sleep under a mosquito bed net.

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Cancer Fighting Foods

 

Evelyn Sherman, a member of  the content team at Steroidsmag, is an ardent health lover, and writer who shares information about health supplements, does product reviews ,and also shares awesome tips on living a healthy life.

In today’s article, Evelyn talks about how Cancer and food habits have a close link and that this has been proved over and over again. Hence it is important to choose the foods we eat carefully. We are pleased to share below top 12 cancer fighting foods and we are sure it will go a long way in helping you and your family members to stay healthy. These foods are rich in antioxidants, vitamins and minerals and when they are consumed regularly they could help a lot in preventing various forms of cancers. The foods mentioned below have been chosen after quite a bit of research and therefore they will be useful in more ways than one.

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Coping With Multiple Sclerosis—For Patients and Caregivers

Rebecca Evans@GeriatricNursing.org, a registered nurse,and a health writer, honors March as  Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month by compositing the follow blog to share with the readers of our blog:

For individuals diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, the diagnosis can be both scary (after all, what does multiple sclerosis really mean?) and a relief (the thing that has been haunting your life finally has a name).

After that diagnosis, however, there can be a transition period, where you struggle to figure out what your treatment and management plan should look like—and where the people in your life struggle to figure out how to act around you, and how to best help you.

That transition period can be incredibly difficult, frustrating, and stressful. Hopefully this article can help you both as you make the transition.

After all, MS patients need help and support—support friends and family often want to give, but may not know how. Consider this a beginning as you start the dialogue with your friends and family.

 

Communication and Education

When a diagnosis is first made, you, your friends, and your family may all have a lot of reading to do. What is MS? What are the symptoms? What are the treatments? What’s the long-term prognosis?

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4 Sneaky Signs of Burnout

 

Tired asian man with eye pain holding glasses in hand

Elizabeth Millard shared with  self@newsletter.self.com  with daunting work tasks, never-finished housework, and raging political firestorms, it’s easy to feel depleted. But when does that frazzle turn from temporary stress into chronic stress and burnout?

“We’re not machines, we all have a limit,” says Jephtha Tausig-Edwards, M.D., a New York–based clinical psychologist. “If you hit that, then you come to the point where you can’t function effectively,” she tells SELF.

Clinically, burnout is defined as having three distinct components: a feeling of low personal accomplishment, detachment from others, and emotional exhaustion. This might come from overwork, but almost any aspect of life can deliver chronic stress if there’s a sense of being overwhelmed.

For example, you could get burned out from volunteer work, exercise, family responsibilities, or any combination of the above. So you’re chairing five committees, dog sitting for a neighbor, and just took on a major basement cleanout? That cracking sound you hear is your self-care abilities splintering.

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4 Rules for Exercising with Osteoporosis

Linda Melone shared in the Silver Sneakers online news for Rivity Health that if you have osteoporosis, you may worry that being active means you’re more likely to fall and break a bone. But the opposite is true. Regular exercise with a properly designed program can help prevent falls and fractures. That’s because exercise strengthens bones and muscles, and improves balance, coordination, and flexibility—all key for people with osteoporosis.

The problem is that guidelines for exercising with osteoporosis are not crystal clear. In general, “you want to do exercises that improve or maintain bone density in the way of strength or resistance training and also include impact-style aerobic exercise,” says Karen Kemmis, D.P.T., an expert for the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

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Stay social and active in your community for healthy aging!

The National Institute on Aging suggests Engaging in social and productive activities you enjoy, like taking an art class or becoming a volunteer in your community or at your place of worship, may help to maintain your well-being as you get older.

Research tells us that older people with an active lifestyle:

  • Are less likely to develop certain diseases. Participating in hobbies and other social and leisure pursuits may lower risk for developing some health problems, including dementia.
  • Have a longer lifespan. One study showed that older adults who reported taking part in social activities (such as playing games, belonging to social groups, or traveling) or meaningful, productive activities (such as having a paid or unpaid job, or gardening) lived longer than people who did not. Researchers are further exploring this connection.

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8 Sneaky Offenders that Cause Weight Fluctuations

Julia Malacoff, Julia@jmalacoff is a former fashion editor turned health and fitness buff who writes about all things lifestyle—especially workouts and food. Recently she shared with MyFitness Pal that when you’re working toward a weight-loss goal, it’s normal to be watching the number on the scale like a hawk waiting for any changes that might occur. But if you’ve been tracking your weight for even a few weeks, you’ve probably noticed fluctuations are common. Still, they can be frustrating to see when you’re working hard to get into your best shape ever.

Even for those who aren’t actively trying to lose weight, it can be unwelcome to see the scale jump up. Rest assured, weight changes from one day to the next are generally temporary and, according to experts, they don’t mean you’re not making progress.

Here, find eight explanations for why your weight can spike — straight from nutritionists who help people meet their weight-loss goals every day — that have nothing to do with gaining fat.

1. YOU DRANK A TON OF WATER

It’s true that staying well-hydrated is a good move if you’re trying to lose weight, but the first few days of upping your water intake could actually cause the number on the scale to creep up, too. Why? “Let’s break down what weight really is,” says Megan Ware, RDN. “It is not just the measurement of fat in the body. It is the weight of your bones, organs, muscles, fluid and waste. When you’re dehydrated, you actually weigh less, but that doesn’t mean you are healthier. Let’s say you don’t drink much fluid one day, and the next morning you wake up and your weight is down. Then you drink a ton of water and the next day it looks like you gained 2 pounds. That does not mean you gained 2 pounds of fat; it just means that your body was depleted of water the day before.”

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