Ten Healthy Eating Tips

yogartRobert Alan Anderson, an AFAA certified personal trainer and martial arts instructor working out of the Washington, D.C. area, and Claire M. LeBrun, M.P.H, R.D., L.D.  a registered dietitian specializing in weight management working out of the Washington, D.C. area tweeted these tips. They are worth sharing!

Healthy Eating Tip No. 1
Start by changing the “snack ratio” in the house. Slowly and gradually have more fruit and healthier snack choices around, rather than the typical, higher-calorie junk food. For instance, have three types of fruit (apples, oranges, grapes) to replace some of the small bags of chips or candy bars. Or simply start replacing unhealthy snacks with alternative choices, such as oatmeal bars, granola bars or peanuts and yogurt.
Healthy Eating Tip No. 2
When shopping at the grocery store, spend more of your time in the outer aisles. That’s where you’ll find the healthier foods, such as fresh fruits, fish and vegetables, which are naturally lower in fat and cholesterol and have not been filled with sugar, salt and other preservatives that add on the pounds. Read more

Sugar Math for Halloween

halloween_cupcake_with_a_bat_on_top_an_trick_or_treat_written_on_it_0515-0912-1919-4745_SMUPosted on 10/29/13 in the Health & Wellness Section of the Wall Street Journal.

By BONNIE ROCHMAN
Research into candy and children helps explain why they love it and, despite some contradictory theories, offers a few guidelines for this time of year.

Children may be more partial than adults to sugar because of the way their taste buds are clustered. “Children have the same number of taste buds as adults, but their tongue is a whole lot smaller, so the flavors are more intense the younger you are,” says Brian Wansink, director of Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab, which researches why we eat what we do. “That’s why little kids don’t like bitter foods and really like sweet foods. The effect is magnified.”

Americans eat far more added sugar—white sugar, brown sugar, corn syrups and honey, among others—than is recommended. The average person consumes 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day, or 355 calories. Boys, ages 14 to 18, take in 34 teaspoons, or roughly 550 calories, according to the American Heart Association. Researchers say children and teens should follow recommendations for adults of no more than 9 teaspoons a day for men and 6 teaspoons for women. Read more

Woman Health Magazine's Calorie Guide

weight-loss-manteca-caThere’s no getting around this fundamental truth: You can’t have weight-loss success unless your calories burned are more than your calories in. Leslie Bonci, M.P.H., R.D., a sports nutritionist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, recommends these formulas for figuring out how many calories your nutrition plan should include.

Everyone is different, but it will give you a basic idea.

Lazy-Day Calorie Goal
(use on days when you’re taking it easy/not exercising):
A. Your weight, in pounds: ____
B. A x 15 = _____
C. B – 500 = _____

Busy-Day Calorie Goal
(use on days when you’re active/exercising):
A. Your weight, in pounds: ____
B. A x 18 = ____
C. B – 500 = ____

Aim for these numbers and you’ll lose 1 pound per week, a weight-loss rate that’s healthy and super-easy to maintain. And … don’t forget to exercise too!

FREE Parent Education Classes! Maintain a Healthy Weight!

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Balance! is pleased to announce our first Parent/Caregiver education sessions.These classes are FREE and based on the We Can! curriculum (a program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

When:
Saturday, November 9, 2013
9:00am-12:00noon
Where: Balance! Pediatric and Family Weight Management Specialists
2525 Ogden Avenue, Downers Grove, IL 60515

Register online at www.balanceweightcenter.com

Read more

The Best Healthy Snacks in Your Supermarket

10776734-healthy-cranberry-snack-bars-on-white-backgroundSnacking has gotten a bad rap, thanks to our tendency to choose empty-calorie snack foods like candy or chips to ease between-meal cravings. But when your stomach starts growling hours before your next meal, a healthy snack is actually a good idea, to hold off hunger and keep energy levels high. 

The supermarkets are full of new products advertised as healthy snacks, many of which come packaged in individual bars, microwaveable cups, and 100-calorie pouches. But which ones pass the test of being both tasty and healthy (or at least not unhealthy)?  These may not be “perfect” snacks, mind you. Some are a bit higher in sugar, saturated fat, or sodium than I would like. But most have:

  • Enough calories to be satisfying, but not so many that the snack becomes a meal.
  • Less fat and saturated fat than other similar snacks.
  • Whole grain and fiber, protein, and/or other nutrients that give them staying power. Read more

Health Local Is On The Air!

HealthLocalThanks to District 44, funding from FORWARD,  and  the wonderful assistance of the guys at Illinois Center for Broadcasting, Health Local is on the air!!!!!

It is tagged on to the end of  SchoolScape, the District 44 cable show.  This way, the education interviews are all contained in the first half hour and all the “healthy stuff” is in the second half hour.  Nice!

 

 

You can catch Health Local weekly on:

Tuesdays at 4:30 on Comcast Channel 19,

and… on the Lombard Channel 6 on:

Wednesday at 11PM
Fridays at 7:30 PM
Saturdays at 11:30 AM and 8:30 PM
Sundays at 2:30 PM.

The first show features:
Generation H:  students from Park View School
Chef’s Corner: Julie Marie cooks Healthy Breaded Vegetables
Healthy Hints:
Interviews at the Glenbard Parent Series Health Fair
The Doctor is In:
Dr. Dungan from DuPage Medical explaining 5,4,3,2,1, GO!
Life Long Lessons:  Joan from Lexington Square
Workout Room:  Pilates at Health Track Sports and Wellness

Shows 2 and 3 are in edit right now.  Yeah!!!!!

A bounty of ideas for healthful breakfasts

42-17233161-630x353breakfastThe Daily Herald Newspaper shared that parents are beginning to again contemplate carpools, homework and how to keep hectic mornings moving smoothly. Because we shouldn’t send our kids off to school without a healthful meal, we should start contemplating breakfast, too.

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, two-thirds of teenage girls and half of teenage boys don’t eat breakfast, even though it has proved to be essential to help them focus and maintain energy levels in school.

There are three key nutrients that make up a wholesome breakfast.
1.  Protein

  • Provides concentrated energy for the body
  • Constructs the brain
  • Repairs tissue
  • Keeps the body satisfied longer

2.  Healthful fat

  • Supplies energy
  • Builds the brain
  • Slows absorption of other parts of the meal, keeping the body satisfied longer

3.  Fiber

  • Reduces risk of heart disease
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Keeps the body full longer

Where to start

Serve any of these items with a side of fruit for a healthful breakfast.

  • Eggs
  • Hard-cooked
  • Scrambled (add veggies)
  • Egg nest: whole grain toast with an egg fried in a hole in the middle
  • Breakfast burrito: scrambled eggs and cheese in a whole-grain wrap
  • Frittata (Make in advance and heat up a slice, or make as muffins so they’re easy to reheat, grab and go.)
  • Green eggs and ham (Chop a handful of spinach into tiny pieces and toss with eggs before scrambling. Serve with a side of nitrate-free bacon or ham.)
  • Smoothies
    1. Start with a frozen banana
    2. Add any combination of fresh or frozen fruit (berries, pineapple, mango, cherries)
    3. For added nutrition, throw in a handful of greens (spinach, kale)
    4. For protein: 1 tablespoon nut butter, a handful of raw cashews or sunflower seeds, or ½ cup plain yogurt
    5. For a creamier texture: ½ cup almond milk or coconut milk
    6. Add water if needed until it blends smoothly    Read more

Get Those Fruits and Veggies!

Fruit-and-veggiesAccording to the Daily Herald, fruits and vegetables contain vitamins, minerals and other nutrients that are essential for good health. That’s one reason why a plant-based diet that includes lots of fruits and vegetables can lower your risk of developing life-threatening diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and some cancers, says Harvard Medical School.

Dinner is typically the largest meal of the day, and it’s a good opportunity to make sure that you meet your daily quota for fruits and vegetables. Here are five easy ways to work more produce into dinner.

Roast vegetables. Roasting is a great way to let the deep, rich flavors of vegetables shine through. Bake cut vegetables at 375° F for 20 to 25 minutes or until they’re lightly browned. You can roast any vegetable — from mushrooms, onions, eggplant and zucchini to tomatoes, broccoli and carrots — so don’t limit yourself.

Poach veggies in low-sodium chicken broth and white wine. To poach, boil enough liquid to cover the vegetables. When it boils, add the vegetables. Turn down the heat to just below boiling and cook the vegetables for about five to seven minutes, until they’re brightly colored and tender-crisp. Read more

September is National Cholesterol Education Month

doctors2September is National Cholesterol Education Month and the DuPage County Health Department reminds residents that this is a good time to get your blood cholesterol checked and take steps to keep it at a healthy level.

High blood cholesterol affects nearly 100 million Americans. It is a serious condition that increases your risk for heart disease and your chance of having a heart attack. The higher your cholesterol level, especially the LDL (bad) cholesterol level, the greater the risk. You can have high cholesterol and not know it.

All people age 20 and older should have their cholesterol measured at least once every five years with a fasting lipoprotein profile, which measures total cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol, HDL (good) cholesterol and triglycerides. See your healthcare provider for his or her recommendation for you. Read more