Balance Weight Center Presents Nutrition Session on October 4th.

balanceflyer

Click on the graphic above to download the informational flyer.

Registration and a participation fee  is required for this event. It will be held at the Balance Weight Loss Center located at 2525 Ogden Avenue. Downers Grove, IL 60515, Phone: 630-929-3009, Web: www.balanceweightcenter.com

Parent Education Session

  • Food demonstration

Learn about:

  • Energy balance
  • Portion size
  • Maintaining healthy weight

Kid Education Session

  • Hands on activities
  • Nutrition Education
  • Kids make a healthy snack.

Watercress packs a nutritional punch

watercrestA recent study at William Paterson University in New Jersey ranked the top “powerhouse fruits and vegetables,” based on the nutrients they provide per calorie.

What topped the list? No, not kale or spinach (though they didn’t do too badly). The most powerful of the powerhouses was watercress, The Washington Post reports.

The ranking used Agriculture Department data based on fruits’ and vegetables’ content of fiber, potassium, protein, calcium, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin A, vitamin D and other nutrients, all considered important to our health.

Watercress, a cruciferous vegetable, received a score of 100 (51 points higher than kale). At only four calories per cup, every bite packs a huge dose of vitamins and minerals.

Watercress, used as a cleansing medicine since ancient times, is a delicate and tender leafy green known for containing high levels of B vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin K, iron, riboflavin, niacin and folate. All of these nutrients help to protect against cancer and heart disease. Watercress is also a good source of calcium.

Watercress is usually found in the herb section of the grocery store.

Knee Pain – The Closest You'll Ever Get to a Panacea

lDerek Unnasch, (Derek@elitextraining.com)
the Owner and a Trainer at Elite X Training in Lombard, IL shares this information about knee pain:

For the last 25 years, I have exercised consistently without ever taking off more than a week  – including the two months I spent recouping from a catastrophic ankle break on crutches. Up until a couple years ago, I went to extremes to maintain big and powerful legs, hoping to keep that condition indefinitely. I pounded my joints mercilessly and without rest, never pondering the consequences of such punishment

Not surprisingly, the price I paid for a quarter century of overtraining was knee pain – bad knee pain! Walking down stairs was the worst. I was resolved to the idea that I must cease training my legs. That was until my mother came to town for a visit. She comes from a long line of bad knees. Her brother just had double knee replacement surgery and my mother had been seeking treatment for her own bad knees. She happened to relate to me something that her doctor had suggested that intrigued me. He recommended that she take massive doses of fish oil pills every day, noting that its daily consumption was accompanied by impressive therapeutic results. Now, I don’t know what constitutes a massive dose, as each horse pill looks like a massive dose in and of itself, but I thought I’d give it a try. Read more

ProActive Kids Summer Session at Good Samaritan Health & Wellness Center

logoProActive Kids teaches kids and their families fun ways to improve health through Exercise, Nutritional Lessons, and Open Discussion over 8 weeks. This life-changing experience is offered FREE to kids ages 8-14 who want to learn new exercises, lose weight, eat right and be more confident. (BMI must be in 85th percentile or above to participate).

UPCOMING SESSIONS
Summer 2014 June 9 – August 1
Fall 2014 September 15 – November 7
DAYS AND TIMES
Monday and Wednesday
Fitness and Lifestyle (Kids Only): 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Friday Family Day
Fitness, Nutrition and Lifestyle: 5:00 – 7:00 pm
WHERE
Good Samaritan Health and Wellness Center
3551 Highland Avenue
Downers Grove, IL 60515

For more information and to enroll, please go to: www.proactivekids.org.
Please submit any inquiries to info@proactivekids.org or call 630.681.1558

Take the first step toward a healthy future. Sign up today to enroll your child and family in ProActive Kids’ next session.   Read more

Celebrate Mom's Day in a Healthy Way!

blueberry-cake-ck-1734304-lBlueberry Coffee Cake – less than 300 calories per slice
(recipie yields 8 slices)

Studded with plump, juicy berries, the cake also features a sprinkling of turbinado sugar on top that adds another dimension of texture. Ideal for breakfast, brunch, dessert, or as a snack to savor with coffee, it’s a recipe you’ll make more than once.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (about 6 3/4 ounces)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 6 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 large egg white
  • 1 1/3 cups low-fat buttermilk
  • Cooking spray
  • 2 cups fresh blueberries
  • 1 tablespoon turbinado sugar

Preparation

  1. 1. Preheat oven to 350°.
  2. 2. Lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine flour, baking powder, soda, and salt, stirring with a whisk.
  3. 3. Place granulated sugar and butter in a large bowl; beat with a mixer at medium speed until well blended (about 2 minutes). Add vanilla, egg, and egg white; beat well. Add flour mixture and buttermilk alternately to sugar mixture, beginning and ending with flour mixture; mix after each addition.
  4. 4. Spoon half of the batter into a 9-inch round baking pan coated with cooking spray. Sprinkle evenly with 1 cup blueberries. Spoon remaining batter over the blueberries; sprinkle evenly with remaining 1 cup blueberries. Sprinkle the top evenly with 1 tablespoon turbinado sugar. Bake at 350° for 50 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan 10 minutes on a wire rack; remove from pan. Cool completely on wire rack.
  5. Note: If using peak-season fruit, use 1 1/2 cups blueberries instead of 2 cups, and only 1 cup buttermilk instead of 1 1/3 cups. This will make the batter thicker so the berries won’t sink to the bottom.

3 Steps to Healthy Eating For Teens

Between media messages (including social media) and commercials that distort ideas of acceptable body images, glorify junk food and fast food and hype crazy fad diets that are all too accessible for impressionable teens, it’s vital for parents to take extra steps to ensure their teen maintains healthy eating habits that can make it easy to maintain a healthy weight and good health for life.  The following are some important steps to healthy eating for teens.

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1.  Breakfast is a Must

Many teens skip breakfast, but it’s not a good idea because breakfast helps teens (and everyone else in the household for that matter), with doing well in school through its impact on brain function, concentration and energy, and it helps with maintaining a healthy weight.

An ideal healthy breakfast includes high quality protein like smoothies with whey protein, eggs (more egg white in proportion to whole eggs to balance cholesterol if they have them frequently) which can be made to go in a whole wheat pita, tortilla or English Muffin, turkey bacon (nitrate free if possible) or a quality energy bar like Quest Nutrition bars made from whey protein.

2.  A Clean Plate is Not Always a Good Thing

Many of the weight loss coaching clients I work with today who struggle with weight issues can trace the messages of “clean your plate” drilled into them as a child, and often with the addition of “don’t you know there are children starving in the world” to magnify the guilt of leaving the table without finishing everything.  While you want your kids to have sufficient nutrition, it’s really beneficial to help them develop the good habit of using their own body cues to tell them when they have had enough food.

3.  Don’t Stigmatize Food

Don’t tell your teens that a food is “bad” or “good.”  All food is fuel, of course some fuel is a better choice than others, and what we have is simply a matter of choice.  You want to refer to foods in a context like “everyday” or “always” instead of “good,” and “sometimes” or “every now and then” foods instead of “bad.”

This is another common thing I have to work on with my coaching clients who have weight challenges that’s been ingrained since they were very little who often refer to themselves as “being bad” or “being good” when they consume certain foods.  When a food is dubbed as “bad” teens can end up with guilty feelings about it which could lead to eating disorders.  It also can become more desirable as something forbidden or rebellious and can foster cravings that lead to overindulgence or even bingeing that would not be the case if the food was not given special status.

Healthy Lombard Partner and Certified Health and Wellness Coach Melanie Jordan specializes in helping others get back to their dream weight for good without gimmicks or deprivation.  Weight Loss Coach Melanie really “gets” those who are challenged with losing and maintaining their weight as she has successfully overcome her own weight struggles and kept off 48 pounds.  Melanie is also an ACE Certified Group Exercise Instructor and Silver Sneakers FLEX Instructor specializing in Senior Fitness (Zumba Gold® Licensed, Ageless Grace® Certified Educator and Silver Sneakers® Classic Exercise and Circuit Training Certified).

Copyright 2014 Your Healthy Life Made Easy LLC

 

G-Free Pizza – Really!

polenta-caprese-pizza-fore296SELF Magazine shared this great
Gluten-Free pizza recipe:

The polenta crust needs to chill at least 2 hours before baking, so prep it the night before (or in the morning before you run to work—it’s that easy). Serves 8

INGREDIENTS

    • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
    • 3 cups 1 percent milk
    • 2 teaspoons salt
    • 1 1/2 cups cornmeal
    • 2 large shallots, thinly sliced
    • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
    • 2 pints cherry tomatoes, halved
    • 3/4 lb fresh mozzarella, cubed

PREPARATION:
Lightly coat a large rimmed baking sheet with 1 tbsp oil. In a large pot, bring milk, 3 cups water and salt to boil over high heat. Whisk in cornmeal in a gentle stream and reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer, stirring often, until polenta is thick and no longer gritty, about 20 minutes. Working quickly, pour polenta into prepared pan, spreading evenly to the edges. Let stand 10 minutes; cover with plastic wrap and press polenta along sides of pan to form edges of crust. Refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight.Heat oven to 450°. Bake chilled crust until it begins to brown at edges, 45 minutes to an hour. Heat remaining 1 tbsp oil in a large saucepan. Sauté shallots and garlic over medium-high heat until soft, 3 minutes. Add tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until they begin to soften, 5 minutes. Mash with the back of a spoon and cook until thickened, 3 minutes more. Season with salt and pepper. Spoon sauce onto the crust, top with cheese and bake until cheese is bubbling, 10 to 15 minutes. Top with basil and cut into squares.

Steps to support brain health, improve overall wellness

cartoon-brain-1Joshua Steckler, owner of Push Fitness, a personal training studio located in Schaumburg specializing in weight loss, muscle toning, and nutrition wrote in a recent Daily Herald article that brain health is an often overlooked aspect of fitness but has a major impact on the overall well-being of the body.

Many times brain health is only addressed once there are known issues. Fortunately, many of the healthy steps we recommend for the well-being of the body will also support healthy brain function.

The following tips will support brain health while improving overall wellness.

Never stop learning. Keep your brain sharp by challenging it on a daily basis. Simple things like brushing your teeth with your non-dominant hand, or trying a new activity that makes you think on your feet like a dance class, or simply reading a book on an unfamiliar topic are all great for keeping the brain active. These types of activities should make you think, learn, and use the brain while embracing the new challenges. Read more

Benefits of Dairy

Dairy Food wbNutrient-rich dairy foods not only help children and adults build healthy diets, they also contribute to healthier lives. Studies show dairy foods, as part of a healthy diet, improve overall diet quality, and may contribute to better bone health, lower blood pressure, and reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. To learn more about the science that supports dairy’s health benefits, access National Dairy Council’s library of science summaries.

7 Research-Backed Breakfast Tips for Faster Weight Loss

breakfastWant to fend off breakfast boredom and lose some pounds? WOMEN’S HEALTH rounded up a week’s worth of ideas for your a.m. meals:

#1 Pick a Cereal with large Flakes
Size matters—even when it comes to wheat flakes. In a newstudy from Penn State, researchers crushed up cereal to create four different sizes of flakes. Because the cereal that was crushed into smaller pieces was denser when participants poured it into a bowl, people underestimated the number of calories in those bowls. The lesson here: If you choose bigger flakes, you’ll consume fewer calories without even noticing the difference.

Click here to find the other 6 tips.