Yoga Diet

yogzfoodYoga expert Wai Lana, who has a daily exercise program on public television shared

According to the science of yoga, we can compare our bodies to vehicles that we use to travel the path of life. The food we eat is like the fuel we put in the gas tank—the better the fuel, the better the vehicle performs. What we eat has a huge impact not only on our physical well-being, but also on our mental and our spiritual well-being. So our diet is a vital component of the yoga lifestyle.

The ancient yoga texts describe the foods that benefit our physical health and stamina, our mental clarity, and our spiritual well-being, as sweet, juicy, palatable, and easy to digest.  They include fruits and vegetables, milk products, sugar and honey, grains, and nuts and seeds, as well as beans and other legumes.

Research confirms that a diet centered on the foods that comprise the yoga diet can help prevent obesity and diseases such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and arthritis and reduce LDL cholesterol levels. These foods also help maintain a healthy body weight, boost our immunity, and may even slow the aging process.

These foods and the countless delicious preparations made from them form the basis of the yoga diet. Because of their inherent qualities of goodness and natural health-giving properties, they are ideal for anyone wanting to live a healthier, happier life.

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Being Healthy is as easy as 5-4-3-2-1 Go! ®

54321_Exclamation_PointMarch is National Nutrition Month and the DuPage County Health Department s encouraging residents to live the 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® lifestyle in order to be healthy and reduce the risk for obesity. Nationally, nearly 1 in 3 children are overweight or obese. Kids who are overweight are more likely to suffer from chronic diseases, like high blood pressure and Type 2 Diabetes. Children who are overweight are also more likely to suffer psychological effects such as bullying and depression.  Fortunately, everyone can take steps toward leading a healthier lifestyle. The 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® message  was created for children ages 3-5 as an easy way to remember the goals to try and meet every day in order to be healthy, but this message also applies to anyone who is striving to live a healthy lifestyle.  The components of the health education message are: eating 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day, drinking 4 glasses of water per day, eating 3 servings of low-fat dairy per day, getting 2 hours or less of screen time per day, and getting 1 hour or more of exercise every day. The 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® message was created by the Consortium to Lower Obesity in Chicago Children (CLOCC) and adopted by FORWARD, the Health Department’s obesity prevention initiative. Since adopting this message, FORWARD has distributed 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® posters, stickers, flyers, and magnets across DuPage County to raise awareness and  free 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® health education programs have been offered in daycares and schools across the county. For ideas and resources on how to use the 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® message in your organizationor classroom, please visit [ http://www.forwarddupage.org ]www.forwarddupage.org. 5-4-3-2-1 Go!® is a registered trademark and Copyright © 2004 Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. All rights reserved. [ http://www.clocc.net ]www.clocc.net

Lead By Example

Scott427The  “A Year of Being Well” e-newsletter shared that leaders come in all shapes and sizes, ages, and races. Someone in your home must assume the role as leader and start the process of getting healthy or continue being an example for others. People learn best through the examples of others, so it’s important that as parents and role models we demonstrate good habits for our children.

 Kids will do what they see adults do.  If we simply preach about instilling healthy habits but we don’t practice good habits ourselves, we’ll never succeed in helping kids eat better, get more sleep, or get more physical activity.

 Being a positive role model means you have to break the unhealthy mold and make better choices for yourself, then teach your kids to do the same.  Just by drinking more water, eating a healthy diet filled with fruits and vegetables, and staying active you can be someone’s hero!

Toddlers show progress in battle against obesity

Healthy SnackON February 26, 2014, Mike Stobbe, Associated Press wrote: Toddler obesity shrank sharply in the past decade, a new study suggests. While promising, it’s not proof that the nation has turned a corner in the battle against childhood obesity, some experts say.

The finding comes from a government study considered a gold-standard gauge of trends in the public’s health. The researchers found that obesity among children ages 2 to 5 decreased — to 8 percent, from 14 percent a decade ago. That would represent a 43 percent drop.

But the only decline was seen in preschoolers, not in older children. And some experts note that even the improvement in toddlers wasn’t a steady decline, and say it’s hard to know yet whether preschooler weight figures are permanently curving down or merely jumping around. Read more

February is Hearth Healthy Month

scaleThe Shaklee Corporation in its Health and Wellness Update has published several great article about how to keep your heath healthy.  The one below caught my eye and I thought it would a good article to share.

Weight Is a Heart Issue – What is being overweight?
Overweight and obesity are both defined by Body Mass Index or BMI (which is a ratio of weight to height). A BMI between 25 and 30 places someone in an overweight category and 30 or higher is considered obese.

 

Why control your weight?

The classifications of overweight and obese are not simply labels; there is a dramatic increase in the likelihood of disease as people increase their BMI, such as:

  • Coronary artery disease (CAD)
  • Certain cancers
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol and triglycerides
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Sleep apnea
  • Stroke
  • Type 2 diabetes

Even having a few extra pounds greatly increases the risk of heart disease.  In a 14 year study, it was shown that moderately overweight (not obese) individuals have an increased risk of heart disease. 50 percent for womeni and over 70 percent for menii

 

The cost of being overweight
Obesity itself is not what causes the harm; it is the diseases that are associated with obesity that cause the harm. The costs of these diseases and syndromes are enormous, and that doesn’t even begin to calculate the personal, physical, and emotional problems associated with increased BMI.

  • Obese people are expected to live 2-4 years less than someone with a healthy weight; the extremely obese (BMI over 40) have 8-10 years taken off their life expectancy. ii
  • More than one-third of adults in the U.S. are considered overweight and another one-third are obese.
  • The medical costs associated with obesity are estimated at over $150 billion dollars.
  • Obese people cost an average of $1,429 more in medical services per year than someone who is normal weight.

Read more

Get Pumped for Hearth Healthy Month

go-red-for-women-logoHeart Disease is now affecting more women than men and in general, heart attacks are more severe in women than in men.

Women should be aware that heart attack symptoms may be different than those experienced by men. Women tend to feel a burning sensation in their upper abdomen and may experience lightheadedness, an upset stomach, and sweating. Because they may not feel the typical pain in the left half of their chest, many women ignore their symptoms and do not even realize they are experiencing a heart attack.

In addition to being aware of common symptoms of a heart attack, women are encouraged to learn and take steps to help prevent heart disease altogether. Use these tips to lower your risk of suffering a heart attack:  Read more

Childhood Obesity – Half of Parents With Obese Kids Don't Consider Them Obese

A new study just published in the March issue of Pediatrics says that half the time parents are turning a blind eye to childhood obesity–they simply don’t see, or want to see, that their child is severely overweight, and consider him/her to be normal weight.

child obesity

The review of 16,000 children ages 2-18 across 69 studies also shared that parents of children aged 2-5 were more likely to underestimate the weight of children who are overweight in elementary school or beyond.

So why the disconnect regarding childhood obesity?  Some parents think kids just have baby fat, or that they’ll grow out of it.  In addition, parents that have have not yet faced up to their own weight problems are going to be less likely to see their kids as having one.

Currently, according to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), one-third of children are overweight or obese, and this puts them at risk for all the health problems that impact overweight adults–Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol, sleep apnea and more–but at a much earlier age.

So how does a parent know if their kid is overweight or obese?  Numbers don’t lie.  A child who is in the 85th – 95th percentile of a BMI chart is overweight, and above that, they are considered obese.  While there are deficiencies in BMI charts, it’s usually only thrown off by a very athletic child with lots of muscle mass, and that’s an obvious exception.

The lesson here is to be honest about your child’s weight situation and work with your medical professional to help him/her healthfully lose the weight so they can grow up to be healthy adults without health issues.  The time to act is now, as another study recently documented that children who are overweight in kindergarten, are four times more likely to be obese by the time they hit 8th grade.

Some easy fixes include:

  • Limit TV and video game time and get your child to move more and be more active
  • Don’t let them drink their calories in the form of juices and sodas
  • Makeover favorite junk foods and comfort foods to their healthiest versions or find an equally acceptable healthier alternative
  • Limit junk foods to be real treats–not everyday items
  • Teach your child about proper portions
  • Make fruits and vegetables fun
  • Help your child make better choices when eating school lunches and eating out

Healthy Lombard Partner and Certified Health and Wellness Coach Melanie Jordan specializes in helping others get back to their dream weight for good without gimmicks or deprivation.  Weight Loss Coach Melanie really “gets” those who are challenged with losing and maintaining their weight as she has successfully overcome her own weight struggles and kept off 48 pounds.  Melanie is also an ACE Certified Group Exercise Instructor and Silver Sneakers FLEX Instructor specializing in Senior Fitness (Zumba Gold® Licensed with Ageless Grace® and Silver Sneakers® Strength Training Certifications pending).

Copyright 2014 SunLover Publishing LLC

 

 

Bert and Ernie Are Speaking "Healthy!"

muffitMarilynn Marchione in an Associated Press article on January 24, 2014 shared that Bert and Ernie jump rope and munch apples and carrots, and Cookie Monster has his namesake treat once a week, not every day. Can a Muppets mini-makeover improve kids’ health, too?

A three-year experiment in South America suggests it can. Now, the Sesame Street project is coming to the United States.

Already, a test run in a New York City preschool has seen results: Four-year-old Jahmeice Strowder got her mom to make cauliflower for the first time in her life. A classmate, Bryson Payne, bugged his dad for a banana every morning and more salads. A parent brought home a loaf of bread instead of Doritos. Read more

Game Plan for Safe Food Handling During Superbowl Parties

logoWith the football season’s biggest game scheduled on February 2, be sure to follow this food safety playbook from the DuPage County Health Department so no one gets sick and everyone goes home a winner.

Many Superbowl parties have an array of appetizers and snacks set out for party-goers.  However, this type of food service, where foods may be out for long periods leaves the door open for uninvited guests –bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses.

Remember this pep talk from the Health Department for safe food handling:  “Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill.”

Below is a game plan on how to host a championship get-together:

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS

Avoid penalties for “illegal use of hands.” Unclean hands are one of the biggest culprits for spreading bacteria, and finger foods at parties are especially vulnerable. Cooks and guests should wash their hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds before and after handling food. Also, be sure to clean eating surfaces often, and wash serving platters before replenishing them with fresh food. Read more

An easier, speedier way to eat more vegetables

Fruit-and-veggiesAssociated Press contributor Sara  MoultonIt write that it is the same thing every year. We overindulge during the holidays, then make solemn (and quickly abandoned) promises to eat healthier and shed pounds in the new year.So here’s a sane and simple resolution that will help you achieve both goals in a single stroke — eat more vegetables.

It’s no secret that almost all vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories. Most also are good sources of dietary fiber, potassium, folate and vitamins A and C. If you did nothing more than pile your plate with vegetables, add a small portion of lean protein, and ramp up your daily exercise a bit, you’d probably find all that extra holiday baggage dropping away without having to count calories.

The only problem with eating more vegetables is that it can take a significant amount of time to prep them, and even more time to cook them. Messing with root vegetables is often a marathon. Beets require 45 minutes to steam or an hour to bake. Carrots or parsnips also can be pretty time-consuming. You can cut the cooking time if you first slice them into smaller pieces, but not all of us are aces with a knife. Read more