Rethink Your Drink Video Sweepstakes Ends Friday!

IAPO

OFFICIAL RULES

General Sweepstakes Information

  • The sponsor of this sweepstakes is the Illinois Public Health Institute (IPHI), which administers the Illinois Alliance to Prevent Obesity (IAPO). IPHI is located at 954 West Washington Boulevard, Suite 405, Mailbox 10, Chicago, IL
  • This is a sweepstakes to illustrate for Illinois residents that it is easy to make low-sugar beverages — and delicious too!

Who May Enter

  • The sweepstakes is open to all residents of the State of Illinois who are 18 years old or older as of February 16, 2015.
  • Employees of the Illinois Public Health Institute and Obesity Action Roadmap endorsing member organizations of the Illinois Alliance to Prevent Obesity, their immediate family members (spouse, parent, child, sibling, and their respective spouses), and persons living in the same household of such employees (whether related or not) are not eligible to enter this sweepstakes.

How to Enter

  • Online submissions will be accepted beginning on Monday, February 16, 2015 at 9:00:00 a.m. Central Daylight Time and ending on Friday, March 6, 2015 at 11:59:59 p.m. Central Daylight Time, according to IPHI’s computers. Mailed submissions must be postmarked between February 16, 2015 and March 6, 2014 and must be received by IPHI no later than March 12, 2015.

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Reducing Sodium in Children’s Diets

saltThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued “Reducing Sodium in Children’s Diets: The Pressure is on to Keep Blood Pressure Down.” This CDC Vital Signs report shows that 9 in 10 U.S. school-aged children eat more sodium than recommended. A high sodium diet can lead to high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

To improve cardiovascular health and help to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017 the CDC is asking everyone to  join them in sharing this information and encouraging action.

The CDC suggests:

  • Sharing information on your organization’s social media channels, including Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and/or Instagram
  • Following and sharing CDC’s social media posts on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Pinterest, andInstagram as well as Million Hearts® posts on Twitter and Facebook
  • Adding the Vital Signs fact sheet to your website news section
  • Posting this information on your website
  • Including an article in your next e-newsletter
  •  Adding a post to your blog

It Is A Good Day For Soup

broccoli-potato-and-cheddar-soupSkinnytaste.com saved that this soup coins the term “spoon-lickin-good,” and you’ll understand why after a sip of this thick, cheesy goodness buffed up with chunks of potato and broccoli florets. The soup base itself is made using fat free milk and reduced fat cheddar helping you trim down on the fat. Recipe makes 4 servings at 1 1/4 cup each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 282; Total Fat: 8g; Saturated Fat: 8g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 45mg; Sodium: 671mg; Total Carbohydrate: 33g; Dietary Fiber: 5g; Sugars: 8g; Protein: 20g

Ingredients:

  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 carrot, chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp flour
  • 2 1/2 cups fat free chicken broth (or vegetable broth)
  • 1 cup fat free milk
  • 2 medium potatoes, peeled and diced small
  • salt and fresh pepper
  • 4 cups (about 2 heads) broccoli florets, chopped into small pieces
  • 1-1/2 cups 2% shredded sharp cheddar
  • 2 slices 2% American cheese
  • 1 tbsp parmesan cheese

Directions:
Chop onion, carrot, celery, garlic in a chopper or mini food processor.

In a large soup pot, melt butter.  Add chopped vegetables and sauté on low heat until soft, about 5 minutes.

Add flour, salt and pepper to the pot and stir until smooth.

Add chicken broth, milk and potatoes and set heat to high until it comes to a boil, thencover and cook on low until potatoes are soft, about 10-15 minutes.

Add broccoli florets, parmesan cheese, and stir well. Adjust salt and pepper to taste.Cook uncovered until broccoli is cooked, about 5 minutes. Add cheddar and American cheese, stir well and remove from heat.

Using an immersion blender, quickly blend part of the soup for a quick second or two. If you don’t have an immersion blender, remove about 1-2 cups of potatoes and broccoli, place it in your chopper, then add it back to the soup. This helps thicken it a bit.

Drink Half Your Body Weight in Water

jeffers-kid-drinking-waterStay hydrated by drinking about half your body weight in fluid ounces of water.

The bonus is that sipping on cold water helps you burn about 100 more calories over the course of a day!

Dietician Julie Upton, MS, RD, of Appetite For Health recommends “drinking about half of your body weight in fluid ounces of water (or other calorie-free beverages). Cold water provides a brief shock to your metabolism, raising it by about 30 percent so that over the course of a day, your body will burn about 100 more calories.” It may sound like a ton of liquid, but it’s an absolutely doable amount; for example, if you weigh 150 pounds, Julie is recommending that you aim for 75 fluid ounces (or just under nine and a half cups of water) a day.

If you’re a soda or juice drinker who is having a tough time making the transition to good old H2O, try these healthy water additions like lemon and mint that can amp up the flavor of your cup and double its detox power.

Rethinking Your Drink?

summer-workout-austinElle Penner, M.P.H., R.D., the Registered Dietitian and Food & Nutrition Editor at MyFitnesssPal, as well as an active runner and food-enthusiast shared that the reasons to stop drinking soda are abundant. Whether you want to cut down on empty calories and added sugars, consume less artificial sweeteners, wean off of caffeine, or even save money, ditching soda is a great place to start.

I actually used to be a big soda drinker–the diet type in particular. Something about it being calorie-free gave me permission to drink it with reckless abandon–so I did. At one point, I consumed more soda than water throughout the course of the day.

Back in 2006 I decided I wanted to rid myself of a dependence on artificial sweeteners, so naturally I started with soda. Over the course of about a year I went from drinking 2-3 sodas per day to 2 to 3 per month. I still very much enjoy a cola with my cheeseburger and french fries, but now that I drink it so much less frequently, I have no problem treating myself to the real deal.

As a former soda-drinker myself, I thought I’d share some tips and tricks I found helpful along the way for those of you who also want to get off the sweet stuff:

1. Be okay with scaling back slowly. If you drink 3+ sodas a day, switching to tap water cold turkey will most likely make every sip feel like a punishment… not to mention induce some serious caffeine withdrawal headaches. I bet you can rather painlessly replace 3 sodas per week with tap or sparkling water, though. Heck, maybe even 1 per day! Whatever the number, make it reasonable. Soda has not, and will not kill you over the next few weeks or months while you gradually get off of it. Over time, you’ll miss those first few sodas less and less and eventually you’ll be ready to cut out one or two more.

 

2. Get on a soda schedule. Keeping #1 in mind, jot down a schedule for weaning your soda consumption. By writing a plan, you’re thinking through and committing to a reasonable approach to drinking less. For example, if you normally drink 3 sodas per day, cut down to 2 per day for an entire month, and then 1 per day the month after. From there, you can gradually cut down even further. Allow yourself 5 per week for the 3rd month, 4 per week for the 4th month, and so on.

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Where does the fat go when you lose it?

body-fat-measureLenny Bernstein from The Washington Post shared that you’ve lost a pound of fat. Congrats, that’s not easy to do during the holidays. But where exactly does it go when you manage to get rid of it?

First, some possible answers:

A. The fat fairy came and took it. That’s why you always weigh less in the morning.

B. You converted it to heat and radiated it into the atmosphere.

C. It’s not really lost, it’s just delayed in Cleveland.

D. You released it as carbon dioxide and water through your lungs.

E. You melted it and excreted it in your urine and feces.

If you didn’t answer D, don’t worry too much. Neither did a bunch of doctors and biochemistry students whom Ruben Meerman queried before writing about all this in a short paper released in the British Medical Journal this month.

“We’re going to remove the mystery,” Meerman said in an interview from Sydney, Australia, where he lives. “Right now, most people, including doctors, have got an idea that’s scientifically incorrect. It’s literally impossible to do what they think is happening.”

Meerman is a former physicist who abandoned that career to take up “science communication,” including work for a popular Australian television show, “Catalyst.” Last year, he lost some weight and began to think about what happens on a molecular level to the kilograms of fat he was shedding.

“I had a little bit of understanding you can’t just turn fat into heat,” he said, though that turned out to be a popular answer when he started asking the question.

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Tis The Season for STRESS!

staying-healthyVirgin Heath shared in its 2014 Survey on “The holidays’ impact on employees’ health happiness (& what it means for employers) that it looks like the stress – not to mention all that turkey and eggnog – is weighing on employees’ health.

Sixty-two percent said eating healthy is the hardest aspect of well-being to maintain during the holidays, with 71 percent of respondents saying they eat unhealthily between two and five days a week.

Employees are also have trouble finding time to exercise and aren’t logging enough sleep. Fifty-one percent and 46 percent, respectively, said these were the aspects of well-being they found hardest to maintain during the holidays. Fifty-nine percent of respondents said they sleep poorly and 51 percent said they skip exercising between two and five days during the holidays.

Encourage your employees to maintain their healthy habits during the holidays, and all year long. With exercise, sleep, and proper nutrition all proven to have dramatic impacts on people’s performance.

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Rethink Your Drink Campaign

RTYD_Banner2-1024x317One of the objectives in the IAPO Obesity Action Roadmap is to “increase consumption of healthy food and beverages in relation to consumption of unhealthy food and beverages that have minimal nutritional value, such as sugar-sweetened beverages and calorie-dense, low-nutrition fast foods.”  More

Passing a penny-per-ounce excise tax on sugary drinks is a long-term goal the coalition defined to help reach the over-arching objective. IAPO members have focused on mobilizing, educating, and advocating with community residents, leaders, and policymakers to reduce access to and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages since the start of IAPO.

A Rethink Your Drink 2014 campaign was kicked off with Illinois Governor Pat Quinn declaring February, 2014 as “Rethink Your Drink Month” in Illinois.  More

In the fall of 2013, IAPO developed its first ever legislative agenda for the spring 2014 session of the Illinois General Assembly. Included on the agenda was the Healthy Eating Active Living (HEAL) Act, which placed a penny per ounce excise tax on sugary beverages with revenues going to community prevention (50%) and the Illinois Medicaid program (50%).

Governed by a state Council of Agencies with input from an Advisory Board, the funds would help support nutrition and physical activity initiatives, local food systems, school health and wellness, public health departments and infrastructure, active transportation, oral health, and expansion of Medicaid prevention services. While the bill did not pass in the spring 2014 legislative session, IAPO will continue to advocate for this legislative proposal as one tool that could reduce obesity in Illinois.

For quick and fun ideas on how to participate, view the IAPO Rethink Your Drink Toolkit.

Rethink Your Drink Tools and Resources

Join us by hosting educational events in your community and/or sending out educational messages about the health impacts of sugary beverages and how people can take steps to rethink their drinks and reduce consumption of sugary beverages through policy and environmental strategies.

 

Health Track Holiday Event – Register NOW!

HealthTrack is hosting a free event for members and guests!!  “Healthier Holiday Treats & Party Ideas” takes place Monday, December 1st from 7-7:45pm.  Jess Krauser is leading the event and registration ends November 28th.

htswholidayClick on this link to download the flyer:  HealthyHolidayTreatsFlyer1114