getvertical

NUHS Encourages Everyone to "Get Vertical"

October is National Chiropractic Health Month. National University of Health Sciences (NUHS) and chiropractic physicians across the country are promoting the importance of joint health and the vital role physical activity plays in keeping joints healthy and pain free. This year’s theme—“Get Vertical”—focuses on getting off the couch or out of the office chair, and standing or moving more each day.  Getting vertical is a great way to prevent joint problems later in life.

Most people know someone with joint pain or someone who has had joint replacement surgery. Joint problems, particularly involving hips and knees, are very common. What many do not know, is that simple lifestyle changes can help prevent the needing for this type of surgery and keep joints healthier longer. Read more

The Best Healthy Snacks in Your Supermarket

10776734-healthy-cranberry-snack-bars-on-white-backgroundSnacking has gotten a bad rap, thanks to our tendency to choose empty-calorie snack foods like candy or chips to ease between-meal cravings. But when your stomach starts growling hours before your next meal, a healthy snack is actually a good idea, to hold off hunger and keep energy levels high. 

The supermarkets are full of new products advertised as healthy snacks, many of which come packaged in individual bars, microwaveable cups, and 100-calorie pouches. But which ones pass the test of being both tasty and healthy (or at least not unhealthy)?  These may not be “perfect” snacks, mind you. Some are a bit higher in sugar, saturated fat, or sodium than I would like. But most have:

  • Enough calories to be satisfying, but not so many that the snack becomes a meal.
  • Less fat and saturated fat than other similar snacks.
  • Whole grain and fiber, protein, and/or other nutrients that give them staying power. Read more

Time To Get That Flu Shot

With influenza season just around the corner, the DuPage County Health Department reminds all County residents—six months and older—to get a seasonal flu shot this year. Flu vaccine is readily available at physician offices, pharmacies, grocery stores, quick care clinics and other locations throughout DuPage County.

 

The Health Department only offers flu shots to eligible children who qualify under the state’s Vaccine For Children guidelines. Flu shots are available to children who have no insurance, have insurance that does not cover immunizations or are recipients of Medicaid and All Kids Health Insurance.

 

Every flu season is different and influenza infection can affect people differently.  Even healthy people can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others.  Flu deaths in the United States range from a low of about 3,000 to a high of about 49,000 people each year.  During a regular flu season, about 90 percent of flu-related deaths occur in people 65 years and older.

 

There are some people who cannot be vaccinated, such as babies younger than six months and those who are allergic to the vaccine.  It is important for people who can be vaccinated, to do so, to protect vulnerable populations who could become seriously ill.  People who are at high risk of developing serious complications if they get sick with the flu include people 65 years and older, pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease and chronic lung disease.

 

It is not too early to get your flu shot.  You can be vaccinated right now and be protected throughout the entire flu season.  The season typically runs from October through May with seasonal flu activity usually peaking in January, February or later.  It takes about two weeks after receiving the vaccine for antibodies to build up in the body, so it is important to get the vaccine before you start seeing flu activity.  Read more

Before You Plan Your Next Trip

The Travel Clinic at the DuPage County Health Department can help you prepare for a safe and healthy trip to any destination in the world. Travel immunizations and health information for foreign travel are available by appointment only. Charges for immunizations vary and are subject to change. For information or appointments please call (630) 682-7400.  The Health Department accepts Blue Cross Blue Shield PPO for travel vaccines.
The Health Department Travel Clinic offers:
•    Travel health information
•    Recommendations or requirements for immunizations
•    Immunizations and pricingboywithsuitcase
•    Information on foreign countries
Please go to the web site, www.dupagehealth.org for Travel Clinic information.

Some of the following immunizations/medications need to be taken two to four weeks prior to travel:
•    Hepatitis A Vaccine
•    Hepatitis B Vaccine
•    Malaria Medication (information only)
•    Measles, Mumps, Rubella Vaccine
•    Meningococcal Vaccine
•    Polio Vaccine
•    Rabies Pre-exposure Vaccine
•    Tetanus / Diphtheria / Pertussis Vaccine
•    Typhoid Fever Vaccine
•    Varicella Vaccine
•    Yellow Fever Vaccine

September is National Preparedness Month

The DuPage County Health Department reminds residents that this is a good time to prepare for unexpected events by assembling an emergency supply kit for their homes.

The Health Department works hand-in-hand with municipalities and other organizations throughout DuPage County to prepare for public health emergencies, including events that require the distribution of medications and other medical supplies to safeguard all county residents.

In the event of an emergency, these items are recommended for a home supply kit:

  • One gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • At least a three-day supply of non-perishable food and a can opener
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a weather radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • A dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Cell phone with chargers, electrical power converter or solar charger

Need A Goal To Work Towards ????

walkingJoin the Wellness Center’s Heart Walk team and Train with us for a month for free with a minimum donation of $10.00   We meet every Saturday starting 8/31/13 through 9/21/13, from 9:00am-10:00am.

Saturday trainings include walking, resistance training, and stretching to help you walk with more.  We meet outside of Kids Korner. The training is outside.

This offer is available for anyone who is interested members and non-members. Invite your friends!

The American Heart Association’s Heart Walk is on September 28th. It is not mandatory to walk on this day to be part of our team. However, We must see your name on our team with the $10 donation in order to join in the Saturday morning fun!

Questions?  Just call 630-275-2670.

To sign up go to: http://www.advocatehealth.com/gsam/wellness

Health Local Is On The Air!

HealthLocalThanks to District 44, funding from FORWARD,  and  the wonderful assistance of the guys at Illinois Center for Broadcasting, Health Local is on the air!!!!!

It is tagged on to the end of  SchoolScape, the District 44 cable show.  This way, the education interviews are all contained in the first half hour and all the “healthy stuff” is in the second half hour.  Nice!

 

 

You can catch Health Local weekly on:

Tuesdays at 4:30 on Comcast Channel 19,

and… on the Lombard Channel 6 on:

Wednesday at 11PM
Fridays at 7:30 PM
Saturdays at 11:30 AM and 8:30 PM
Sundays at 2:30 PM.

The first show features:
Generation H:  students from Park View School
Chef’s Corner: Julie Marie cooks Healthy Breaded Vegetables
Healthy Hints:
Interviews at the Glenbard Parent Series Health Fair
The Doctor is In:
Dr. Dungan from DuPage Medical explaining 5,4,3,2,1, GO!
Life Long Lessons:  Joan from Lexington Square
Workout Room:  Pilates at Health Track Sports and Wellness

Shows 2 and 3 are in edit right now.  Yeah!!!!!

Getting past those exercise excuses

bearexerciseThe Daily Herald Newspaper  had a great article on  Labor Day about exercise.

Now, what was your excuse ????

(printed 9/2/13) You know the benefits of exercise and you have most likely heard them a zillion times: a healthier heart, reduced risk for some cancers, better sleep patterns, weight loss, lower stress levels, stronger bones and muscles, less fear of falling, mental acuity, more energy and confidence.

Yet, according to the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, only 3 out of 10 American adults get enough exercise. Quality of life can be improved by walking at a moderate pace 30 minutes a day. If walking hurts your joints, you can take your exercising to the water.
We make excuses to make us feel less discomfort if we are committed to exercise and don’t do it, Dan Kirschenbaum, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Medical School, said.

Exercise excuses — and solutions

1. I don’t have time!

  • Think of exercise as important as brushing your teeth or any other daily routine — for best results, you need to be consistent.
  • Include exercise times on your calendar as you would other appointments and reschedule when you miss.
  • Don’t forget in-home workouts, where you may be more flexible to fit short bursts of exercise into your day; exercise does not have to be a formal workout.
  • Create movement. Put on some music and make up your own dance steps, walk an extra lap in the mall or grocery store, take the stairs instead of the elevator, walk instead of drive whenever you can.
  • Keep weights near the television, using them while watching some of your favorite shows and stretch during commercials. Read more

A bounty of ideas for healthful breakfasts

42-17233161-630x353breakfastThe Daily Herald Newspaper shared that parents are beginning to again contemplate carpools, homework and how to keep hectic mornings moving smoothly. Because we shouldn’t send our kids off to school without a healthful meal, we should start contemplating breakfast, too.

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, two-thirds of teenage girls and half of teenage boys don’t eat breakfast, even though it has proved to be essential to help them focus and maintain energy levels in school.

There are three key nutrients that make up a wholesome breakfast.
1.  Protein

  • Provides concentrated energy for the body
  • Constructs the brain
  • Repairs tissue
  • Keeps the body satisfied longer

2.  Healthful fat

  • Supplies energy
  • Builds the brain
  • Slows absorption of other parts of the meal, keeping the body satisfied longer

3.  Fiber

  • Reduces risk of heart disease
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Keeps the body full longer

Where to start

Serve any of these items with a side of fruit for a healthful breakfast.

  • Eggs
  • Hard-cooked
  • Scrambled (add veggies)
  • Egg nest: whole grain toast with an egg fried in a hole in the middle
  • Breakfast burrito: scrambled eggs and cheese in a whole-grain wrap
  • Frittata (Make in advance and heat up a slice, or make as muffins so they’re easy to reheat, grab and go.)
  • Green eggs and ham (Chop a handful of spinach into tiny pieces and toss with eggs before scrambling. Serve with a side of nitrate-free bacon or ham.)
  • Smoothies
    1. Start with a frozen banana
    2. Add any combination of fresh or frozen fruit (berries, pineapple, mango, cherries)
    3. For added nutrition, throw in a handful of greens (spinach, kale)
    4. For protein: 1 tablespoon nut butter, a handful of raw cashews or sunflower seeds, or ½ cup plain yogurt
    5. For a creamier texture: ½ cup almond milk or coconut milk
    6. Add water if needed until it blends smoothly    Read more

September is National Cholesterol Education Month

doctors2September is National Cholesterol Education Month and the DuPage County Health Department reminds residents that this is a good time to get your blood cholesterol checked and take steps to keep it at a healthy level.

High blood cholesterol affects nearly 100 million Americans. It is a serious condition that increases your risk for heart disease and your chance of having a heart attack. The higher your cholesterol level, especially the LDL (bad) cholesterol level, the greater the risk. You can have high cholesterol and not know it.

All people age 20 and older should have their cholesterol measured at least once every five years with a fasting lipoprotein profile, which measures total cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol, HDL (good) cholesterol and triglycerides. See your healthcare provider for his or her recommendation for you. Read more