Have Fun – Win Prizes

Have you registered yet for Flat Apple 2017?  No?  There is still time to participate and earn raffle tickets to win some great prizes.

All you have to do is:

  1. Click on the Facebook link at the top of our website at www.healthylombard.com and then click “Sign Up” or use the link on the Flat Apple 2017 Page on our website. WHEN REGISTERING, PLEASE REMEMBER AFTER YOU FILL IN THE STUDENT INFORMATION TO COMPLETE THE PARENT/GUARDIAN INFORMATION. Once registered you will receive confirmation and a copy of the 2017 logo.
  2. Like us on our Facebook Healthy Lombard Selfies page (so that you can post your Selfies and Videos).
  1. Participate in any or all of the Flat Apple Activity. There are 4 ways to have fun:

 

  • Go to a designated site BETWEEN June 1 and August 10. (I.e. Guest Services Desk, Located Lower Level below The Eatery at Yorktown Mall, (the list can be found on both the Healthy Lombard’s Flat Apple 2017 webpage and Calendar Page), show the Flat Apple logo, participate in their activity, and then fill out a raffle ticket.
  • Find our Geocache sites. (The coordinates will be listed on our Flat Apple Page and emailed out to participants.) Take a selfie with the Flat Apple Geo Sign, post it on our Facebook Healthy Lombard Page. (We will fill out one raffle ticket for you per site/per day.)
  • Create a 1-minute or less video on a healthy topic using Facebook Live, Instagram, or similar app. (ideas are on the Healthy Lombard Flat Apple 2017 website). Post it to our Facebook Healthy Lombard Page (We will fill out one raffle ticket for you for each posting we approve.) Remember to add in your family password so we can find you!
  • Take a selfie of YOU doing something healthy (swimming, playing ball, etc.) using Instagram or a similar app. Post it to our Facebook Healthy Lombard Page. DON’T FORGET to add in your family password so we can fill out a raffle ticket for you. Limit – 1 photo per day.)

 

THE FINE PRINT:

The participant (preschool – high school age individual) MUST BE registered by a parent or guardian to win.

 

Although Flat Apple activities are open to children from preschool to high school, some events are age-specific so please check event information on the Flat Apple 2017 Page of the Healthy Lombard website.

 

Individuals participate in activities at their own risk.

 

Students may participate in more than 1 activity per day but cannot repeat an activity (i.e. student could do 1 geocache photo, 1 selfie photo, 1 video, and 1 site activity each day but cannot do 2 or more of the same type of activity each day.)

 

Registering grants permission for photo of participation (not name) to be posted on the Healthy Lombard Internet sites.

 

*Raffle drawing will be held at the August Healthy Lombard Partner Board Meeting. Winners will be notified by email or phone and their FIRST names will be posted on the Flat Apple 2017 page of the Healthy Lombard website.

 

Winners and their families will be invited to a prize reception in September.

 

Questions?    Check out the Flat Apple 2017

 

The Top 8 Worst Candies to Place in Your Child’s Easter Basket

College of DuPage Nursing Student McKenna Musich, shared that it’s almost that time of year again! Hopping bunnies, pastel eggs, fake grass, and sweet candies. Easter is just around the corner and most parents are planning just what to stash in those colorful baskets. According to Statistic Brain Research Group, in 2016 the United States spent 2.1 billion dollars on Easter candy. But which candy is the worst candy to place in the basket? Let’s take a look at the top 8 worst candies for Easter.

  1. Reese’s Peanut Butter Eggs – One serving is one piece. Each piece is 170 calories. There is 90 calories from fat and 16 grams of sugar.
  1. Cadbury Crème Eggs – Serving size is one egg. Calories per serving is 170, with 54 of those calories from fat. These eggs contain 25 grams of sugar.
  1. Almond Joy Egg – Serving size 1 egg. 277 calories, 12 g of fat. 1 gram of sugar. While 1 gram of sugar may not seem like much, note that there is 735 mg of sodium in one egg (about 30% of the daily value).
  1. M&Ms (Easter eggs) – Serving size is ¼ of a cup. Calories total to 203 (about 10% of the daily value), with 4 g of fat. Sugar rests at 1 gram.
  1. Peeps  – One serving (5 Peeps) contains 140 calories. None of these calories come from fat, but Peeps contain 34 grams of sugar.
  1. Jelly Beans – Serving size is 31 pieces. Calories per serving is 140, 0 from fat. There is 29 grams of sugar per serving.

  7.  Swedish Fish – These little fish come in limited edition “egg” form for Easter. The serving size is 9 pieces. There is 140 calories , 0 of those from fat. These have 29 grams of sugar per serving.

  1. Hersey’s Easter Eggs – Serving size is 8 pieces. 550 calories (nearly 30% of the daily value). 0 grams of fat or sugar.

So this Easter, take a second look at those nutrition facts and make the right call. A healthy Easter is a happy Easter!

References

All nutritional facts were found using MyFitnessPal.

“Easter Statistics-Statistic Brain.”2017 Statistic Brain Research Institute, publishing as Statistic Brain. 23rd March, 2017. Http://www.statisticbrain.com/Easter-statistics

“Are we there yet?”

Schar, producers of gluten-free products shared that long car journeys with children are often exhausting, boring and take their toll on your nerves. But this does not have to be the case. With a bit of preparation and our ideas and suggestions, which are guaranteed to be gluten free, bad moods need never be an issue when you are on the way to your holiday destination.

  • Small children in particular often react sensitively if you disturb their routine. You should therefore consider your little ones’ sleeping and eating habits even when you are en route. On no account should you take the children out of their car seats when they are asleep; your offspring should never be in the car without their seat belts on.
  • Even though you have air conditioning, consider that the little ones need protection from the sun: The sun shades that can be attached to the windows using a suction cup are amusing to look at and keep the worst of the heat at bay.
  • One thing that is really important is provisions. Fruit is great to take on a trip because it is easy to digest and does not sit heavily in the stomach. Lovingly prepared gluten free bread rolls, such as Ciabatta or Deli Style from Schar, which can be filled with all kinds of delicious ingredients, are also ideal.
  • In order to ensure that things are not too “healthy”, think about taking something sweet as well – which, of course, can be gluten free; unfilled biscuits such as Shortbread cookies may be crumbly, but they do not leave behind any greasy marks so they are safe to take with you in the car. Lightly salted gluten free snacks such as Schar Table Crackers also work well.

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Girls and autism: It can be subtle, or absent

sad-girlThink autism and an image of an awkward boy typically emerges. The developmental disorder is at least four times more common in boys, but scientists taking a closer look are finding some gender-based surprises: Many girls with autism have social skills that can mask the condition. And some girls are born without autism despite the same genetic mutations seen in boys with the condition, The Associated Press reports.

The gender effect is a hot topic in autism research and one that could lead to new ways of diagnosing and treating a condition that affects at least 1 in 68 U.S. children.

Better understanding of gender’s role is key to helping the most people, said Kevin Pelphrey, an autism researcher at George Washington University. “Autism may not be the same thing in boys and girls.”

Brain imaging suggests there may be an additional explanation for why many girls with autism have more subtle symptoms, Pelphrey said.

“The surprising thing we are finding is that even in girls who clearly have autism,” brain regions involved in social behavior that are normally affected are less severely impaired, he said. Read more

Remember: September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

FORWARD-LogoAnn Marchetti, FORWARD Director shared that FORWARD places a high priority on reducing the rates of childhood obesity in DuPage County, as highlighted in the annual FORWARD BMI report.
Over the next 3 years, FORWARD will work with community leaders and key stakeholders to improve nutrition and physical activity within schools, worksites, and for children in the early childhood years. This work needs your helps and Ann invite each one of you to become familiar with the three-year goals below, and to partner with FORWARD to help  meet or exceed the objectives.  
Check out resources and next steps here: for worksites, for early childhood centers, and for schools.

Teens and Drugs- Important Insights

 

ParentsMatterToo is dedicated to connecting parents and caregivers to educational parenting resources, conversation circles and support programs. Our goal is to empower parents and caregivers with expert knowledge to challenge our children’s choices about social issues, drugs and alcohol to ultimately strengthen the fabric of our families and community in a nonjudgmental environment.

You can find more information about Parents Matter Too at:

Twitter   Facebook    Website      Youtube

Exercise Before the Bell May Improve Young Children’s Focus

kidss exercisingAnn Lukits, reporter for the Wall Street Journal, shared that sitting still and listening to the teacher can be a challenge for young children, especially after a long vacation. Scheduling a physical-education class before the morning bell could improve their focus, suggests a small study in Preventive Medicine Reports.

Researchers found that children spent more time following instructions and working quietly at their desk—so-called on-task behaviors—on days they participated in a school-run physical-activity program before the start of morning classes. On days they didn’t exercise, the children were more likely to interrupt, make noise and stare into space, known as off-task behaviors.

Gym classes are traditionally held during school hours but many schools have reduced the time allotted for physical activity in favor of academic subjects, the researchers said. Before-school programs may improve students’ in-class behavior and readiness to learn without taking time away from academics, the study suggested.

Previous studies have shown that bouts of high-intensity physical activity can enhance students’ cognition, especially executive function, which involves processes that make it possible to stay focused, the researchers noted. Read more

Childhood Obesity Consequences

obess kid on scaleThe “Let’s Move” Campaign shared that children who are overweight or obese can be undernourished at the same time if the foods and beverages they consume are not very nutritious in terms of vitamins and minerals. Nutrition deficiencies impair brain development and cognitive functioning, including learning. Energy needed for optimal child growth and development is impacted by diet.

Obesity increases the likelihood of certain diseases and health problems, such as:

  • Heart disease
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Sleep apnea and respiratory problems
  • Hypertension
  • High blood cholesterol
  • Stroke
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Gynecological problems
  • Liver and gallbladder disease

Obese children also face more social and psychological problems, such as discrimination and poor self-esteem, which can continue into adulthood.
Children who are not physically active, regardless of their weight status, have more behavioral and disciplinary problems, shorter attention spans in class and do not perform as well in school compared to active children.

What Poverty Does to Kids' Brains

brainThe Outreach House in Lombard shared this article
from Mother Jones
that speaks about
how growing up
poor leads to slower
brain development
and lower test scores,
according to a new study.

 

This study (http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.1475) suggests that growing up poor affects brain development at an early age, and those brain changes can have huge effects on academic achievement.

Researchers from Duke University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison tracked nearly 400 children and young adults in a longitudinal study over the course of six years, between 2001 and 2007. Every two years, the researchers met with the participants,whose socioeconomic backgrounds ranged from far below the poverty line to far above it.

At each meeting, the participants would undergo a brain scan, which measured the amount of gray matter in parts of the brain that are key to academic achievement: the frontal lobe (which helps with executive functioning and emotion regulation), the temporal lobe (memory an academically, like visual processing, math computation, visual motor coordination, concept formation, and more.

Read more

How to Prevent Childhood Obesity and Diabetes

diabetic kidMichael Greger, M.D. shared that thirty years ago, virtually all diabetes in young individuals was thought to be autoimmune Type 1 diabetes, but since the mid-90s, we started to see an increase in Type 2 diabetes among youth, particularly in the United States. Indeed, “the term adult onset diabetes has now been scrapped and replaced with ‘Type 2’ because children as young as eight are now developing the disease.” And the effects can be just as devastating. A 15-year follow-up of children diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes found an alarming rate in young adults of blindness, amputation, kidney failure and death in young adulthood.

Why the dramatic rise in childhood diabetes? The dramatic rise in childhood diabetes is due to the dramatic rise in childhood obesity. During the past 30 years, the number of children diagnosed as being overweight has increased by more than 100 percent. Once an obese child reaches age six, it’s likely they’ll stay that way. And even if they don’t, being overweight in our youth predicts adult disease and death regardless of adult body weight.

Being an overweight teen may predict disease risk 55 years later, including twice the risk of dying from heart attack, more cancer, gout, and arthritis. In fact being overweight as a teen “was a more powerful predictor of these risks then being overweight in adulthood.” This underscores the importance of focusing on preventing childhood obesity.

How do we do it? From the official American Academy of Pediatrics clinical practice guidelines: the problem appears to be kids eating too much fat and added sugar, and not eating enough fruits and vegetables.

Doctors, at every occasion beginning soon after a child’s birth, should endeavor to give sound advice regarding nutrition and growth so that obesity and its complications may be curtailed. What might sound advice sound like?

The chair of the nutrition department at Loma Linda published a review suggesting not eating meat at all might be an effective strategy. Population studies have consistently shown that vegetarians are thinner than comparable non-vegetarians.

In the largest such study to date (highlighted in my video How to Prevent Prediabetes in Children), a body mass index over 30 is considered obese, 25 to 30 overweight, and under 25 an ideal weight. The non-vegetarians were up at 28.8, showing the average meat-eater in the U.S. is significantly overweight. As one gets more and more plant-based, the average BMI drops. But even the average vegetarian in the U.S. is overweight. The only dietary group that was, on average, ideal weight were those eating strictly plant-based. It comes out to be about a 30-pound difference between average vegans and meat-eaters.

n school-aged children, the consumption of animal foods (meats, dairy, or eggs) is associated with an increased risk of being overweight, whereas plant-based equivalents like veggie burgers, veggie dogs, and veggie cold cuts were not. The whole plant foods like grains, beans, and nuts were found to be protective.

This may be because plant-based diets are low in energy density and high in starch, fiber, and water, which may increase feelings of fullness and resting energy expenditure, meaning resting metabolic rate. Eating plant-based appears to boost metabolism, such that you just burn more calories at rest. However, we’re not sure how much of the benefits are due to increased consumption of plant foods versus decreased consumption of meat.

“Plant-based diets should be encouraged and promoted for optimal health. Local, national and international food policies are warranted to support social marketing messages and to reduce the social, cultural, economic and political forces that make it difficult to promote such diets.” For example, although the advice to consume a plant-based diet is sound, questions arise concerning the relatively high price of produce.

We could reduce the burden of childhood obesity and prevent further spread of the disease, but we need to ensure that plant foods are affordable and accessible to children of all income levels. Getting diabetes in childhood cuts about 20 years of their life. What parent wouldn’t go to the ends of the Earth to add decades to their children’s lives? Fruits and vegetables may not fit on the Dollar Menu, but our kids are worth it.

We make life and death decisions at the grocery store buying food for our family. It’s never too early to start our kids off on the right foot. See my video Heart Disease Starts in Childhood.

And healthy doesn’t have to mean more expensive. Check out Eating Healthy on a Budget.

For some tips on getting our kids to eat their vegetables, see my videos Tricks to Get Kids to Eat Healthier at School and Tricks to Get Kids to Eat Healthier at Home.

Once one has prediabetes, there’s a way to prevent it from progressing further. See my video How to Prevent Prediabetes from Turning into Diabetes.

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