ProActive Kids Foundation Announces Exclusive Nutrition Education Provider

In celebration of National Nutrition Month, the ProActive Kids Foundation announced on March 7, that it has formed an exclusive partnership with NCES Health and Nutrition Education (NCES) from Olathe, KS, a nutrition resource company that specializes in creating and distributing nutrition education materials to dietitians and healthcare professionals, schools, and government agencies both nationally and internationally.
ProActive Kids Foundation selected NCES Nutrition as their exclusive curriculum partner in nutrition education for their comprehensive nutrition education resources, industry expertise and shared mission of fighting the childhood obesity crisis via education. They join Meier Clinics’ mental health coaching and Right Fit Sport Fitness Wellness’ physical activity curriculum to complete this evidence-based, proven intervention curriculum. Collectively, ProActive Kids and its partners continue to deliver, review and refine its curriculum to ensure its meeting the research, trends and desired industry outcomes.

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McDonald’s moves cheeseburgers off Happy Meal menu

Associated Press Retail Reporter Joseph Pisani and video journalist Carrie Antlfinger shared with the Daily Herald newspaper that McDonald’s is taking cheeseburgers and chocolate milk off its Happy Meal menu in an effort to cut down on the calories, sodium, saturated fat and sugar that kids consume at its restaurants.

Diners can still ask specifically for cheeseburgers or chocolate milk with the kid’s meal, but the fast-food company said that not listing them will reduce how often they’re ordered. Since it removed soda from the Happy Meal menu four years ago, orders for it with Happy Meals have fallen 14 percent, the company said. Hamburgers and Chicken McNuggets will remain the main entrees on the Happy Meal menu. Read more

10 ways to keep your family heart healthy

Helping your young kids adopt a healthy lifestyle may not seem as urgent as telling them to wear bike helmets or to stay near the lifeguard at the beach, but it can be life-saving. By laying this groundwork you’re arming them for a lifetime of reduced risk of heart disease, the leading cause of death in adults.

As a personal trainer, Mary Bielawski is well versed in what’s needed for a healthy lifestyle — especially the right exercise and good nutrition. She shares this information with her clients at Edward-Elmhurst Health & Fitness and uses it to create a way of life for her children, 6-year-old Ethan and 3-year-old Evelyn.

Bielawski suggests these strategies for helping your family stay heart healthy:

No couch potatoes: 5 tips for keeping your family on the move

  1. Children 6 and older need at least an hour a day of physical activity, according to Health & Human Services guidelines. School kids often need some down time, too. Let them recharge for their active time by playing with toys, reading a book or just relaxing. Limit time spent online, watching TV or playing video games.
  2. If your young child regularly pushes back about playing outside, give them choices. For example, offer to take them for a walk or to the park, or they can play in the yard. “Often, when my son gets back from the activity he chose he says, ‘That was fun Mom, I’m glad I went,’” says Bielawski.
  3. Start an enjoyable, active family tradition. Bielawski hopes to start weekly hikes in the local nature preserve for her whole family. “My kids will have fun checking out the bugs and flowers,” she says. Other parents and kids might try regular bike rides, swims or bowling.
  4. Build activity into your daily routines. Do a few squats or other exercises while you stir the soup or wait for the laundry to dry. Park at the farthest end of the parking lot. Take the stairs or put on some music and just dance.
  5. Do something good for your body while doing good for others. If your kids are old enough, volunteer as a family for something physical, such as clearing brush for a conservation project or packing boxes for disaster relief.

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Impact of the 2010 US Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act

Impact of the 2010 US Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act on School Breakfast and Lunch Participation Rates Between 2008 and 2015.

OBJECTIVES: –
To evaluate National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) participation over a 7-year period before and after the implementation of the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA), which required healthier school lunch options beginning in school year (SY) 2012-2013 and healthier school breakfast options beginning in SY2013-2014.

METHODS: –
Data were gathered from low-income, high-minority public schools in 4 New Jersey cities. We conducted longitudinal analyses of annual average daily participation (ADP) in school meals among enrolled students overall and among those eligible for free or reduced-price meals. We used linear mixed models to compare NSLP and SBP participation rates from SY2008-2009 to SY2014-2015.

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12 tips for buying safe toys

Susan Stevens Martin from the American Academy of Pediatrics shared in the Daily Herald that whether they’re wrapped under a tree or exchanged with the lighting of a candle, giving gifts to children is a favorite part of winter holidays.

When choosing a toy for a child, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the toy be appropriate for the child’s age and stage of development. This makes it more likely the toy will engage the child — and reduces the risk it could cause injury.

If you are shopping for a toy for a child this holiday season, here are a few tips from the AAP.

1. Read the label. Warning labels give important information about how to use a toy and what ages the toy is safe for. Be sure to show your child how to use the toy the right way.

2. Look for learning toys. When choosing gifts for babies and toddlers, consider toys that will build developmental skills. Toys that can be manipulated, such as shape sorters, stacking blocks, and baby-safe puzzles, are great for developing fine motor, cognitive, and perceptual skills.

3. Think LARGE. If you are buying a toy for a child under age 3, make sure all toys and parts are larger than the child’s mouth to prevent choking. Read more

How to manage sibling rivalry

Advocate Children’s Hospital shared that for parents, there is no way around it. Having more than one child likely means one thing in your household; rivalry. And while all the bickering and competition may be irritating and stressful, rivalry is not such a bad thing when handled properly.

In fact, it can actually help build necessary lifelong skills and lead your kids to a healthier life.

No matter what the age difference, tension and conflicts tend to arise between siblings over a variety of things, ranging in severity.

“The way siblings handle these conflicts depends on several factors, but the most important is how they are taught by their parents to manage them,” says Dr. Joanna Lindell, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at Advocate Children’s Hospital. “If you can remember the acronym PEACE, these five tips may bring peace to your home, at least most of the time.”

P: Pick and choose which rivalries to leave alone and which ones to intervene on.

Typically, small squabbles should be left for siblings to try to resolve on their own. However, the second it starts to get emotionally abusive, like insulting remarks, and/or physically abusive, parents must quickly jump in and address the conflict.

E: Eliminate equality. While children think in terms of “fair” a lot, the world mostly does not. So the earlier kids are taught this concept, the more adaptable they can become.

Example: “Just because your older sister got a new back pack does not mean you have to have one.”

Explain reasons for things.

“She had hers for a long time and it is worn out, you just got a new one last year. But we can look at some new tennis shoes next week for you, since you’ve had yours for a while and they have holes in them.”

A: Alone one-on-one time with a parent is essential.

This “special” time (a lot of sources highly recommend using the word “special” a lot) will help build each parent-child relationship and decrease resentments.

The one thing every child wants more than anything is the attention of his/her parents and will tend to fight their sibling for it, unless it is given enough.

C: Comparisons; just don’t go there, especially in front of the other sibling.

This will only make one child feel worse about him or herself and the other one gloat. It’s not the best lesson to teach.

Additionally, if possible and appropriate, separate each sibling when intervening in these situations. This will allow you to listen to each child’s side, let them cool off, and deal with each at their developmental level.

E: Expectations; set them!

Kids do thrive on structure and rules, as much as they resist it. The clearer you can be on what is and is not appropriate, the better.

Practice the “hands-to-self” rule, encourage empathic behavior and responses and schedule family meetings to resolve disagreements, if necessary.

“Teaching your children PEACE is actually a good way to prepare them for life and for building relationships with others along the way,” adds Dr. Lindell.

• Children’s health is a continuing series. This week’s article is courtesy of Advocate Children’s Hospital. For more information, visit www. advocatechildrenshospital.com.

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To fidget spin or not to fidget spin?

Dr. Erik L. Johnson, a pediatrician with the Amita Health Medical Care Group, shared the following about Spinners:

Some light up. Some play music. All spin in a mesmerizing way. But do fidget spinners — the kid craze of 2017 — have health benefits, or are they a health hazard?

Some retailers have claimed that spinners have health benefits, such as easing stress, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.A recent article by Forbes contributor Bruce Y. Lee explored the science behind the allure of spinners and found that:

• Fidgeting may prevent your mind from being occupied by obsessive and unhealthy thoughts.

• Body movements are actually part of the thinking and expression process.

• Fidgeting serves as a ritual. Rituals can offer comforting predictability, familiarity and structure that may be relatively absent in real life.

So a fidget spinner can’t hurt if you have a fidgety child, right?

Well, maybe.

It turns out that spinners also might be hazardous to your child’s health.

A consumer watchdog group, World Against Toys Causing Harm, Inc., reported this summer that the spinners can fall apart, and their small pieces can be swallowed, creating a choking hazard.

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Apple Crunch Day is October 12, 2017!

The Illinois Great Apple Crunch is a daylong celebration of Midwest produce. Schools across the state participate by serving local apples on the lunch tray and crunching into them together as a school.  It is a fun event that lets schools support Illinois farmers and teach their students about healthy, fresh, and local food. Educational supplements are provided for use in the cafeteria and the classroom to teach students about Illinois apples.  Mark your calendars for Thursday, October 12th, 2017 and join participants across Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana and Ohio on Thursday, October 12, 2017, for the fourth annual Great Lakes Great Apple Crunch. Participants of all ages are invited to help us reach our goal of ONE MILLION CRUNCHES this year!

 

Last year, Healthy Lombard partnered with Jewel/Osco on Main Street to provide apples for community members, and students in Lombard Elementary School District District 44 and Glenbard High School District 87.

Over 3000 apple coupons were distributed making this event a HUGE success.

Please join us this year and crunch an apple on October 12yth

Does your teen want a tattoo?

Lisa Black wrote for the American Academy of Pediatrics that like them or not, tattoos and piercings have entered the mainstream as a fashion phenomenon.

Children can spot them on celebrities, sports heroes, their baby sitters and baristas, so it is no surprise that teenagers might start thinking about making their own personal statement through ink or piercing.

Before they make that decision, young people are encouraged to talk with their doctor to review the possible consequences and potential risks associated with permanent tattoos, piercings and other body modifications.

That recommendation comes from the American Academy of Pediatrics, which published its first clinical report on tattoos in September.

Pediatricians recognized the popularity of body art and the need for doctors — and their patients — to understand the health and social ramifications.

“Tattooing is much more accepted than it was 15 to 20 years ago,” said Dr. Cora C. Breuner, an adolescent medicine specialist and chair of the AAP Committee on Adolescence, and the lead author of the AAP report. “These services have come a long way, safety-wise, but it’s best to proceed with caution.”

When counseling teens, Dr. Breuner urges her patients to do some research, to think hard about why they want a tattoo, and where on their body they want it.

While societal acceptance of tattoos and piercings has increased, there may still be repercussions. In a 2014 survey, 76 percent of 2,700 people interviewed said they believed that a tattoo or piercing had hurt their chances of getting a job.

Each state’s tattooing laws vary, but at least 45 states have laws prohibiting minors from getting tattoos, including Illinois. Thirty-eight states have laws that prohibit both body piercing and tattooing on minors without parental permission. In Illinois, minors can get a piercing with written permission from a parent or legal guardian.

The AAP recommends:

• If you are considering a tattoo, make sure all of your immunizations are up-to-date, and that you are not taking any medication that compromises your immunity.

• Before getting a tattoo or piercing, make sure the salon is sterile, clean and reputable. The facility should be regulated by the state and provide clients with information on how to care for the area that has been tattooed or pierced afterward. The facility should practice infection control just like at the doctor’s office.

The AAP also recommends teens talk with their parents before getting a tattoo or piercing.

“In most cases, teens just enjoy the look of the tattoo or piercing, but we do advise them to talk any decision over with their parents or another adult first,” said Dr. David Levine, a co-author of the AAP report. “They may not realize how expensive it is to remove a tattoo, or how a piercing on your tongue might result in a chipped tooth.”

Laser removal of tattoos can range from $49 to $300 per square inch of treatment area.

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