PROACTIVE KIDS COMES TO LOMBARD!

Pro-Active Kids will be offering the PAK 8-week pediatric weight management program at the Lombard Commons starting this January. It will be joint-funded by Advocate Good Sam and Edward-Elmhurst Health. This is a FREE program for OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE KIDS ages 8-14.

ProActive Kids teaches kids and their families fun ways to improve health through Exercise,
Nutritional Lessons, and Open Discussion over 8 weeks.
This life-changing experience is  offered FREE to kids ages 8-14 who want to learn new exercises, lose weight, eat right and be more condent.
UPCOMING SESSIONS
 Winter 2017 January 23 – March 17
Spring 2017 April 10 – June 2
DAYS AND TIMES
Monday and Wednesday
Fitness and Lifestyle (Kids Only): 4:00 – 5:30 pm
Friday Family Day
Fitness, Nutrition and Lifestyle: 4:00 – 6:00 pm
For more information and to enroll, please visit their website at www.proactivekids.org or Please submit inquiries to info@proactivekids.org or call 630.681.1558

Life Expectancy Falls

three-generationsMike Stobbe, Associated Press Media Writer, shared  that a decades-long trend of rising life expectancy in the U.S. could be ending: It declined last year and it is no better than it was four years ago.

In most of the years since World War II, life expectancy in the U.S. has inched up, thanks to medical advances, public health campaigns and better nutrition and education.

But last year it slipped, an exceedingly rare event in a year that did not include a major disease outbreak. Other one-year declines occurred in 1993, when the nation was in the throes of the AIDS epidemic, and 1980, the result of an especially nasty flu season.

A decades-long trend of rising life expectancy in the U.S. could be ending: It declined last year and it is no better than it was four years ago.

In most of the years since World War II, life expectancy in the U.S. has inched up, thanks to medical advances, public health campaigns and better nutrition and education.

But last year it slipped, an exceedingly rare event in a year that did not include a major disease outbreak. Other one-year declines occurred in 1993, when the nation was in the throes of the AIDS epidemic, and 1980, the result of an especially nasty flu season.

Read more

Social Determinants of Health

impace-dupage
Growing DuPage County’s capacity to effectively track and manage the social determinants of health (SDOH) is a key goal highlighted in the Access to Health Services action plan. In support of this goal, the Impact DuPage website has been updated with a new Social Determinants of Health Dashboard, allowing users to view all social determinant indicators on one page.
SDOH are the conditions in which people live, learn, work, and play. These conditions can include factors such as socioeconomic status, education, the physical environment, employment, social support networks, and access to health care.

Read more

Celebrate National Farm to School Month

nfts_logo_reversed_signatureOctober is National Farm to School Month, a time to celebrate the connections happening all over the country between children and local food! The 2016 National Farm to School Month theme, One Small Step, celebrates the simple ways anyone can get informed, get involved and take action to advance farm to school in their own communities and across the country. Take the One Small Step Pledgeand you’ll be entered to win support for farm to school activities at the school or early care and education site of your choice! Whether you’re an educator, food service professional, farmer or food-loving family, there are countless small steps you can take to celebrate this October! Learn more about National Farm to School Month and take the One Small Step Pledge by visiting the National Farm to School Network’s website, farmtoschool.org.

Remember: September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

FORWARD-LogoAnn Marchetti, FORWARD Director shared that FORWARD places a high priority on reducing the rates of childhood obesity in DuPage County, as highlighted in the annual FORWARD BMI report.
Over the next 3 years, FORWARD will work with community leaders and key stakeholders to improve nutrition and physical activity within schools, worksites, and for children in the early childhood years. This work needs your helps and Ann invite each one of you to become familiar with the three-year goals below, and to partner with FORWARD to help  meet or exceed the objectives.  
Check out resources and next steps here: for worksites, for early childhood centers, and for schools.

Exercise Before the Bell May Improve Young Children’s Focus

kidss exercisingAnn Lukits, reporter for the Wall Street Journal, shared that sitting still and listening to the teacher can be a challenge for young children, especially after a long vacation. Scheduling a physical-education class before the morning bell could improve their focus, suggests a small study in Preventive Medicine Reports.

Researchers found that children spent more time following instructions and working quietly at their desk—so-called on-task behaviors—on days they participated in a school-run physical-activity program before the start of morning classes. On days they didn’t exercise, the children were more likely to interrupt, make noise and stare into space, known as off-task behaviors.

Gym classes are traditionally held during school hours but many schools have reduced the time allotted for physical activity in favor of academic subjects, the researchers said. Before-school programs may improve students’ in-class behavior and readiness to learn without taking time away from academics, the study suggested.

Previous studies have shown that bouts of high-intensity physical activity can enhance students’ cognition, especially executive function, which involves processes that make it possible to stay focused, the researchers noted. Read more

Childhood Obesity Facts

obess girlThe “Let’s MOve” Campaign shared that in recent years, obesity rates for preschool-aged children have declined slightly but still remain much too high. Children who are overweight or obese as preschoolers are five times more likely to become obese adults than normal weight children.

  • Approximately 23 percent of children aged two to five years are overweight or obese.
  • Obesity rates for young children doubled in about a 20 year period of time (1980s – 2000s).
  • One out of eight low-income, preschool-aged children is obese.
  • Some children are at higher risk for obesity: American Indian and Alaska Native (20.7%) and Hispanic (17.9%) children aged two to four years have the highest rates of obesity.

Read more about the prevalence of child obesity in the United States.

Childhood Obesity Consequences

obess kid on scaleThe “Let’s Move” Campaign shared that children who are overweight or obese can be undernourished at the same time if the foods and beverages they consume are not very nutritious in terms of vitamins and minerals. Nutrition deficiencies impair brain development and cognitive functioning, including learning. Energy needed for optimal child growth and development is impacted by diet.

Obesity increases the likelihood of certain diseases and health problems, such as:

  • Heart disease
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Sleep apnea and respiratory problems
  • Hypertension
  • High blood cholesterol
  • Stroke
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Gynecological problems
  • Liver and gallbladder disease

Obese children also face more social and psychological problems, such as discrimination and poor self-esteem, which can continue into adulthood.
Children who are not physically active, regardless of their weight status, have more behavioral and disciplinary problems, shorter attention spans in class and do not perform as well in school compared to active children.

5 tips for keeping kids healthy in school

Back to schoolAnn Piccininni, Daily Herald Correspondent, shared that the bell is about to ring, heralding the start of a new school year. As parents take children shopping for backpacks and other necessary supplies, medical professionals remind parents and students that preparing for school isn’t only about buying the right educational tools.

Cultivating a few simple habits can help make the year a healthier one, said Dr. Julie Miaczynski, family medicine physician at Edward Medical Group in the Edward Healthcare Center in Plainfield.

Wash hands

“As kids go back to school, because of the nature of the environment, the close proximity to each other, we see a spike in colds, flu, that type of thing,” she said. “We remind people of really good hand-washing habits.”

Frequent washing won’t prevent all microbial threats from causing illness. Inevitably, hands will come into contact with some nasty germs.

“Try to avoid touching the face. That’s really important,” she said.

When students come home from school each day, they potentially and unwittingly bring germs with them. Miaczynski recommends families take steps to stop the spread of germs before they infect family members.

“Around the house, wipe down knobs and handles,” she said. Stepped-up routine cleaning can help prevent colds and flu germs from getting a foothold in the household.”

Read more

FREE PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN STRUGGLING WITH WEIGHT

proactive-kidsA new school year has begun and school physicals are well under way!  As a clinician, you will see many overweight children over the next few weeks and we hope you remember to tell them there is a place where they can get help –

ProActive Kids is a health education program offered FREE to children ages 8-14 who are considered obese or overweight and their families.

 Click here for more information on the complete program.  

There is a ProActive Kids program in your community where you can refer your patients. We will help them learn how to live a healthier lifestyle!

TO REFER A CHILD OR FAMILY   Please refer patients, students or parents to the ProActive Kids website at www.proactivekids.org  or ask them to call 630-681-1558.

LOCATIONS FOR FALL 2015 (Sept 21 – Nov 13)
ProActive Kids locations are made possible by the following generous funding sources. 

Addison, IL — At Club Fitness at Addison Park District, Funded by Edward-Elmhurst Healthcare

Downers Grove, IL  — At Good Samaritan Health and Wellness Center, Funded by Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital

Melrose Park, IL — At Gottlieb Memorial Hospital,  Funded by Loyola University Health System

 Oak Lawn, IL — At Oak Lawn Ice Arena – Oak Lawn Park District, Funded by Advocate Children’s Hospital Oak Lawn

Park Ridge/Niles, IL — At Gemini  Junior High School, Funded by Advocate Children’s Hospital Park Ridge

 Woodridge, IL — At Edward Health and Fitness Center, Funded by Edward-Elmhurst Healthcare