Teens Need More Sleep

Eleven-and-a-half-hour days of schoolwork, homework-laden evenings and early mornings, and long schedules of activities have youth sleep-deprived and stressed, with high school students suffering the most. What do teens think it will take to help them get the sleep they need and deserve?

GENYOUth’s latest survey on teens and sleep, conducted in partnership with Sleep Number, offers new — and surprising — perspective on a topic of fundamental importance to supporting the whole child.

Like nutrition and physical activity, adequate sleep is vital to students’ health and well-being and essential to learning.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Children and adolescents who don’t get enough sleep are at increased risk for obesity, diabetes, injuries, poor mental health, and attention and behavior problems, which can affect them academically.”1 And the National Sleep Foundation notes that sleep “can even help [students] to eat better and manage the stress of being a teen.”

Sleep deficits among youth are well documented.

The CDC reports that nearly 73% of U.S. high school students and almost 58% of middle-school students receive less than the recommended amount of nighttime sleep. An American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement “recognizes insufficient sleep in adolescents as an important public  health issue that significantly affects the health and safety, as well as the academic success, of our nation’s middle and high school students.”

Screen-based media is often cited as a contributor to widespread sleep deficiencies.

Given this situation, this GENYOUth Insights survey aimed to investigate attitudes, trends, and possible solutions to the pervasive lack of sleep among today’s youth ages 13 to 18. students and almost 58% of middle-school students receive less than the recommended amount of nighttime sleep. An American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement “recognizes insufficient sleep in adolescents as an important public health issue that significantly affects the health and safety, as well as the academic success, of our nation’s middle and high school students.”

Screen-based media is often cited as a contributor to widespread sleep deficiencies.

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