Balance Screen Time with Green Time

According to by  in  The New Nature Movement –   nature experiences can be a perfect antidote to the buzzing distraction of modern childhood. After a trip to the forest or the beach, the mind seems reinvigorated. Here’s why.

Attention Restoration Theory, first developed by Rachel and Stephen Kaplan, asserts that people can concentrate better after spending time in nature or even looking at scenes of nature. Turning the theory into practice, by encouraging people to spend time outdoors in urban parks or wilderness areas has been shown to help many people.

Students can experience significant benefits. According to Attention Restoration Theory, resting in green environments allows students to regain the attentional focus they need for academic success in school. Concentrating in the classroom requires the brain to work in a way that cannot be maintained forever. The longer the brain must hold focus and ignore distraction, the more it loses the ability to concentrate.

Students can experience significant benefits. According to Attention Restoration Theory, resting in green environments allows students to regain the attentional focus they need for academic success in school. Concentrating in the classroom requires the brain to work in a way that cannot be maintained forever. The longer the brain must hold focus and ignore distraction, the more it loses the ability to concentration.

Today, the need for revitalizing the attentional focus is more relevant than ever. Worldwide, screens increasingly claim our children’s attentional resources during both school and leisure time. Although smart technology can be used for pleasure and social activities, studies suggest that overuse leads to smart technology-induced stress and addiction in students.

We don’t yet have a complete picture of why and how smart technology drains cognitive resources. But research has found that frequent use may result in long-term attentional disturbances, such as the so-called phantom vibration and phantom ringing hallucinations, where one becomes so preoccupied by the potential for an alert, that one begins to sense them when they do not exist.Apart from its potential to induce stress, continuous stimulation by smart technology may have unwanted side-effects on how we manage our thought processes, including divergent thinking — self-generated thoughts which occur without a fixed course. Divergent thinking is linked to creativity, and is required for adaptation to future events, sustaining a sense of self-identity, and re-interpreting social encounters.

This is where resting in nature comes in. In our recent paper published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, we describe how unthreatening natural environments sooth us and counteract the negative effects of smart technology. We propose that the mental work occurring during a restoration period — so-called mind wandering (off-task thoughts that occur either with or without intention) — is sustained by natural environments. And we point to the need for more research that relates to green environments, spontaneous thought processes, and divergent thinking.

Hence, coupling periods of smart technology use with periods of exposure to a natural environment may be optimal for children in the 21st century.

As an afterthought, the consequences of using smart technology within natural environments are not yet known, although research on the effect of using Pokémon Go may give us some indications. Such smartphone games are likely to increase physical activity levels and may favor children who are already fond of both gaming and outdoor physical activities. Our future studies will identify how technology can be used to encourage different children to get outside.

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